Tag Archives: vulvodynia

18Jun/16

Biology of pelvic pain

Pain nowMost of the biology of pelvic pain does not exist in the pelvis. The same is true for any pain — back pain, knee pain, neck pain etc. Much like the screen turning blank in the cinema, the problem itself is not the screen but instead the projector or the power source. In other words, to think about pain requires us to go well beyond the place where it is experienced.

Pain is of course lived and whilst it must have a location, the relationship between pain and injury is unreliable. With a huge number of factors influencing the chances of feeling pain in any given circumstance, there is a requirement for a perception of threat that is salient and exceeds other predictions in terms of a hierarchy. Once felt, pain compels action much like thirst and hunger. Again, like thirst and hunger, context and meaning we give to the sensations influence that very experience, which clarifies to a greater extent the difference between on-going (chronic) pain and that of labour.

To feel pain we need a concept of the body, which itself is constructed elsewhere as the sensory information flowing from the body systems is predicted to mean something based upon what is already known and has been experienced, we need a nervous system, an immune system, a sensorimotor system, a sense of self and consciousness to name but a few. Where in the pelvis do these reside?

This is not to ignore where we may feel pain as this is an ‘access’ to the pain experience that should be used in terms of movement and touch. However, it is the person who is in pain and not the body part. My pelvis is not in pain, I am. My pelvis does not go and seek help, I do. My pelvis does not ease its pain, I do. So when ‘treating’ a person, we must go beyond the place where the pain is felt to be successful. And it is vital that the person is considered a whole; there is no separation of mind-body. The notion of physiological, body, psychological division etc. etc., just does not fit with the lived experience; I think, and I do so with my whole person — embodied cognition.

Locally one will usually find evidence of protection and guarding, which themselves manifest as the tightness, spasm, painful responses to touch and movement. This is all manifest of an overall state of protection, co-ordinated largely unconsciously accompanied by a range of behaviours and thinking that quickly become habitual — they are certainly learned from priors, our reference point. This is simply why delving gently into the story is important, as we can identify vulnerabilities to persisting pain such as previous experiences of pain, functional pain syndromes, stressful episodes in life; all those things that put us on alert when the range of cues and triggers gradually expand so now I am vigilant and responding to all sorts of normal situations with fear.

The start point is always developing the person’s working knowledge of their pain, which also validates their story. So many people still report that they feel that they have not been believed, which I find incredible. How can someone work in healthCARE and not believe what a person says? Baffling. Once the working knowledge is being utilised and is generating a new backstory, new reference points emerge. We create opportunities for good experiences over and over, moment to moment, day after day, in line with their desired outcome, the healthy ‘me’ that is envisioned from word go. This strong foundation that opens choices once more then permits exploration of normal and desired activities supported by sensorimotor training and other nourishing movements, alongside techniques in focus, relisience and motivation. Realising and actualising change in a desired direction must be acknowledged as the person lives this change knowing that they can.

Pain can and does change when you understand it, know where you want to go and how to get there, quickly getting back to wise, healthy action when distracted (i.e./ flare ups, mood variance, loss of focus etc). The biology of the pain is one aspect, hidden in the dark within us, and the lived experience is another. The two are drawn together to give meaning and to develop an understanding of the thinking and action that sculpt a new perception of self and pain, resuming the sense of who I am, as only known and lived by that person.

07Dec/15

Pain Coach for vulvodynia

VulvodyniaPain Coach for vulvodynia and other persisting pains is an approach based on a blend of the latest thinking in pain science and strengths-based coaching. What does this mean?

Modern thinking about pain considers that the lived experience of pain is ‘whole person’, in other words, it is ‘me’ who is in pain and not the body part/area. By addressing the person, in effect steering thoughts, feelings and behaviours towards health, pain is overcome and a meaningful life is resumed, as defined by the individual themselves. Bearing this in mind, we can seek to achieve this with strategies that parallel the lived experience, becoming new habits that nurture change in a way that is healthy. Pain is embedded with the person, their life, their reality and how this is created by their whole self — body systems (including the brain, immune system), their body and the environment.

With pain being part of who we are at that moment, we need to be able to think clearly and logically about that moment, seeing it for what it is, and then respond in the best and wisest way. We are continually updating, with a fundamental design that means we change with every passing moment. The brain predicts what will happen next and the sum of the best guessed meaning to all sensory information is what we perceive in that moment. Each moment is of course in passing, with a new one on the way. Nothing is permanent, and this is also true for pain. Having a baseline understanding creates a new layer of thinking, which creates a new layer of lived experience each moment, and this is how we can overcome pain. You may ask why, if we are always changing, has my pain persisted; and this is a great question.

Why does pain persist? On one level, it is because there is on-going prediction of the need for protection against a perceived threat. The range of cues and triggers widens over time, as does vigilance and habits of thinking that underpin and flavour the lived experience. The sensory and sampling systems adapt and suggest threat, and the prediction goes on and on, until you take decisive action and create new thinking and behaviours to take the continual change in a new direction. To do this, as I said earlier, the new awareness and habits need to match the lived experience, and be employed moment to moment–in any given moment you need to be able to be witness to your thinking, emotional state and bodily sensations, then using this awareness to decide upon the best action (UBER-M is one of my self-coaching strategies that I have previously written about).

Putting this into practice for vulvodynia, we begin with the development of a working knowledge of the individual’s pain and what influences their pain (e.g. stress, anxiety, context, environment, anticipation, expectation, attentional bias, catastrophising, hypervigilance — to name but a few). Using this working knowledge, the person creates a sense of safety that is the foundation of the precise actions taken: specific exercises, training, general exercise, breathing/mindful techniques, re-charging (energy), movements that all form the healthy actions. This is becoming your own coach, so that at any given moment you can think and act to cultivate healthy habits, and in so doing, replace those that have been predictive of the need to protect.

The most frequently described pain experience is during intercourse with the clear impact upon the person and potentially affecting relationships and an ability to conceive. All are greatly emotive. There is often, rightly or wrongly, a sense of wanting to be healthy once again for their partner’s sake. Within this thinking, there can be a sense of guilt with the individual being hard upon themselves, the latter being a common characteristic, and one that needs to be addressed by developing kindness towards self.

UP | understand painAnticipation that a movement or activity will hurt sets up a cycle of protection — priming, expectant thoughts that drive tension and changes in perception, predictions of the need for protect then predominate and sure enough, the experience is painful and the cycle maintained through habit of thought and action. There are many points when new habits can be created from the moment of initiation of intercourse to during intercourse at different points (an anticipatory thought, a sensation of pain) and developing new thinking and reactions by practicing at other times — in essence reconfiguring the whole experience to resume the intimacy rather than fear of pain.

Pain Coach ProgrammeWe are designed to change, and we are changing continuously — it may not always seem like it, bit if you stop for a moment and note how your thoughts, feelings and body sensations shift and move like Constable’s skies, even within a minute or two, you will be aware of this in action. This awareness opens an opportunity to consciously decide to make changes in a direction of health, and in so doing, change your pain with new realisation and action. This all begins with the understanding of pain so that you can take wise action at every moment. The skills that you develop for overcoming vulvodynia you have probably noticed will be transferable to many areas of life because this is about your lived experience, moment to moment. Many women report feeling calmer, noticing more, responding and thinking with greater clarity and generally feeling well and healthy.

Pain Coach Programme to overcome persisting pain problems — t. 07518 445493

21Sep/15

Vulvodynia

VulvodyniaVulvodynia is a painful condition, often exquisitely so, located in the vulva, which is the skin surrounding the vagina. Usually unexplained, this troubling condition can arise seemingly from nowhere, interfere with intimate relations and hence attempts to conceive. Vulvodynia is also known as a functional pain syndrome–these are painful problems that lack a pathology of note that explains the extent of the pain and include irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, TMJ dysfunction, migraine and pelvic pain. Functional pain syndromes are often concurrent with hypermobility, anxiety and depression, a further common character trait being perfectionism and a tendency for the person to be hard on themselves thereby creating a cycle of chronic stress.

The pain of vulvodynia is often very localised and triggered by direct contact. Naturally this occurs during sex and touch, but sometimes sitting position can bring on the pain. As with any sensitisation, there is a primary location of pain but there can also be a secondary area surrounding that is due to central nervous system (and other systems) involvement. Suspected vulvodynia or other pains in the pelvis should be assessed and examined by a gynaecologist as a first step before beginning treatment, and by a consultant who knows and understands both the condition and the impact — Miss Deborah Boyle at 132 Harley Street.

With vulvodynia often being part of an overall picture of sensitivity, it means that there is a common biological adaptation that is upstream of the range of seemingly different conditions (the functional pain syndromes). As soon as the individual understands that pain is not an accurate indicator if tissue damage, but rather a reflection of the perceived threat and prioritisation by the body-person, there is a realisation that the pain can change. Pain can change because perceptions can change as we take on board new information and consequently think and act differently, creating new habits. The new habits set the conditions for on-going and sustained change that includes overcoming pain.

We have limited attention and hence can only be aware of certain amount of stimuli in any given moment. If pain is consuming much or all of your attention and consciousness, then this is all that is happening in that moment, with all other possible experiences being disregarded–it is a matter of prioritisation. When the perception of threat is reduced by a constructive thought or action, the pain moves out of our attention span and we become aware of other thoughts, feelings and experiences. How we respond to pain is unique and learned through our lifetime right up until that point; all those bumps and bruises as a child, how our parents reacted, more serious injuries or illnesses and the messages we received from doctors, teachers and other ‘big people’, then through adult life, moulding our beliefs about ourselves, the world, health and pain each time we feel it. The sum of all this activity, most of which we are unaware of, sets up how you respond to the next ache, pain or injury, blended of course with genetics. It seems that some people are genetically set up to be more inflammatory, meaning that responses to injury are potentially more vigorous and go on for longer. Understanding this means that the right messages and treatment can be given, thereby appropriately addressing the injury or pain. One of the big problems is that this does not happen, and the explanations are structural and based upon the body tissues. This ignores the fact that we have body systems that protect and these systems have sampling mechanisms in the tissues and organs but largely exist elsewhere–e.g./ nervous system, autonomic nervous system, endocrine system, sensorimotor system, immune system. We have to go upstream as well as improve the health and mobility of the local tissues.

Going upstream is vital in overcoming vulvodynia, and this is where the Pain Coach Programme works–this is my part of the treatment programme. You may also choose to work with a women’s health physiotherapist who will work more locally. So what is the Pain Coach Programme?

The Pain Coach Programme is a a blend of the latest neuroscience of pain with a strengths based coaching approach to success. Understanding your pain and that you have the biology and strengths to overcome your pain is a vital start point. You have been successful in the past using these strengths, and you can do so again by drawing on these characteristics and using them to develop your health in terms of how you think and act. Overcoming pain is all about resuming a meaningful life, engaging with activities and people as you want to, in a way that allows you to flourish. The Pain Coach Programme provides you with the knowledge and skills that you need to in effect become your own coach, moment to moment making clear decisions that take you towards your vision of how you want to live. This alongside treatment and specific training to develop normal movement and a healthy body-mind. The skills you learn also help you to fully engage in life, whether this be at home, at work or at play.

If you suffer vulvodynia or other painful problems, call us now to start your programme: 07518 445493