Tag Archives: sports injury

24Nov/14
Sturridge thigh injury

One injury, and then another…and another….

Sturridge thigh injury

Sturridge | more thigh troubles

It is a common scenario sadly, both in professional and amateur sports. One injury, then another and another, each demoralising further. It is noteworthy that the science of pain would say that expectations and other thoughts about the pain and injury will affect the pain itself, potentially increasing the overall threat value — recall from previous writings that pain is a response to threat, and not to just that of the actual injury itself. We must consider any threat to the whole person, and this includes thoughts about oneself and one’s career.

When the body is sensitised by an initial injury, despite healing this sensitivity can persist subtly. In other words, at a certain level of activity there is no problem, no defence. But reaching a new level of training may then reach the current threshold that is not yet back to normal. The threshold is the physiological point where messages are scrutinised by the neuroimmune system that is already vigilant to potential threat. There does not need to be an actual threat, just a perceived one by these vigilant body systems, which then triggers a biological defence: pain, altered planning of movement, altered thinking etc.

The continuous journey back to full fitness requires a complete integration of physical and mental preparedness. As well as tissue strength, endurance and mobility, the controlling mechanisms must switch back to normal settings rather than protect — i.e. the upstream: muscles do what they are told by the motor system that originates in the motor areas of the brain, and the motor system plans and executes movement. The planning of movement not only occurs when the ball is about to be kicked or a run begun, but also when thinking about the acts or watching another. As well as these influencing what is happening, these are also great rehabilitation tools to fully prepare the system for the rigours of the game as well as ensuring completeness of recovery: the player resumes the right thinking, decision-making, motor control as well as fitness.

 

28Mar/13
SportEX

Chronic pain in sport | painphysio article in SportEX journal

In the April edition of the SportEX journal you can read my article on chronic pain in sport – click here

Chronic pain and recurring injuries in sport are a huge problem. The modern approach uses the latest neuroscience to tackle the pain and restore normal function required for the particular sport.

Call us for details on 07932 689081 or read more about our treatment programmes here

29Aug/12

Back pain in football and sport

Back pain is a common experience across society. Millions are spent each year on treatment yet we do not seem to be making any significant progress in tackling this vast problem. Undoubtedly footballers are also subject to spinal aches and pains, either from a direct injury or insidiously. Most people whom I see fall into the latter category, when the pain comes on gradually, the individual seeking help when the pain reaches a troubling level.

Frequently back pain is blamed upon a disc injury, a facet joint problem, arthritis or a ligament sprain. In the acute stages the muscles often tighten or spasm making it very difficult to move. The pain can be extremely intense and worrying, but in fact this is a normal body response to the problem, even if there is no significant damage to the tissues. It can sometimes take a few days for this to subside, with any movement triggering pain–when we move our arms and legs, because the trunk muscles are also being used it means that they can tighten and be painful.

Acute pain – seek help if you are unsure

The general advice with acute back pain is to remain active as possible. Usually your GP will suggest pain relief or anti-inflammatory medication to help ease the symptoms. Gentle and tolerable exercise maintains the tissue mobility meaning that movement becomes easier and easier. Typically the back will stiffen when we do not move, being painful and tight when we have to change position. Sometimes our posture is altered and we tilt forward or to one side, the muscles pulling the spine into a position of protection. Arguably pushing or pulling (manipulation) this into a straightened position is to force the body into a position and work against the natural protective mechanisms. It does seem that spinal manipulation can ease pain in the short term but does not necessarily offer a better long-term outcome. Consistent movement and positional change is a sensible option.

A study completed some years ago demonstrated that the best predictor of back pain was the ability to hold the back isometrically. With the individual lying face down on a table, his hips at the edge with the trunk being held straight out over the edge, they tested the endurance factor, i.e./ how long they could hold the position. Those with the ability to maintain the position were less likely to experience back pain over the next year.

Core stability encompasses a range of exercises that supposedly create a strong ‘middle’, thereby reducing the risk of back pain. This is based on research that was undertaken in Australia some years ago. Subsequent studies have found that to truly optimise the trunk muscles they need to be working as part of an overall movement strategy controlled by the brain. This requires subtle yet focused training with a strong cognitive element to ensure that the deeper muscles are working at the right level (very low) and with the right timing. This does not mean pulling the low abdomen in as tightly as possible. In fact, many whom I see who have practiced this end up with greater tension and pain as a result.

We simply cannot dissociate lifestyle factors from back pain. Our habits at home, work and during physical activity will have an effect upon the spinal tissues. At this point we have to consider the way in which we feel as stress plays a huge role in pain and how we use our body. The physiology of stress affects every system in the body including the musculoskeletal system where our movements and posturing are manifestations of our thinking. For example, many will tense their shoulders or clench their jaws on becoming stressed. Our thought processes therefore, have an enormous role to play in how we hold ourselves and move. In essence, movement is an expression of what we do and think about. When a pain has persisted for some time, dealing with stressors and emotions must be part of a comprehensive treatment programme. In the acute stage of back pain when fear and anxiety play a role in the protection, having a reassuring explanation is key to starting the process of recovery.

Many people with back pain demonstrate a fear of movement and avoid certain activities. The fear usually develops during the acute episode and is reinforced by further bouts of pain. This is one of the clearest demonstrations of how thinking affects our movement. Interestingly, the amygdala in the brain that deals with fear is connected with the motor centres thereby exerting an effect upon the planning and execution of movement. One of the primary roles of the healthcare professional is to thoroughly assess the patient and fully explain the symptoms and provide a meaning so as to reduce the fear factor and encourage positive engagement in tackling the problem proactively with physical and cognitive measures.

Spinal health in my view cannot be separated from our general health and lifestyle. Considering our physical activity levels, posturing, state of mind, life circumstances, past experiences, our beliefs about pain and injury, culture and the implications of injury are just some of the factors we must think about. No injury or pain happens in isolation. There is always a background to the initiation of pain whether it be acute or gradually building over a period of time. Our job is to look at the individual and their circumstances around the problem in order to find a route forward to recovery and health.

Many sports people will complain of back pain as it is such a common problem. With the right knowledge and strategies over a realistic timeline, the pain can change and we can adapt positively to lead fulfilling and active lives.

21Apr/12

The importance of the first minutes, hours and days of an injury

Sustaining an injury is commonplace in sport. What happens in the first few minutes, hours and days can play a big part in how well we recover. The injury needs to be diagnosed and understood, for example an ankle twisting beyond the normal range of movement that results in a sprained ligament. As important is our response to the injury, what action we take and what we think about it. This blog explores these points with the aim of clarifying good practice in the first instance of an injury.

Our response to an injury includes how we protect the area, how we communicate that we are injured and the thoughts going on in our head. All are influential. How we protect a new injury is often by holding it, perhaps rubbing the area, limping, applying a bandage or using a set of crutches. This is very useful as the healing process begins immediately and the tissues need this protection to enable this activity. Communicating our pain and injury is individual. Some will cry out, use a facial expression, raise an arm to call the bench for help and others will suppress the urge to call out or use other ways of minimising body language. However, it is often difficult to do this with the acute pain of a freshly sprained ligament or strained muscle. Finally, the thoughts running through our head will vary but could include ‘What have I done?’, ‘What does this mean to my career in football?’ or ‘Not again!’. These thoughts are really important as they will be the conscious reflection of our beliefs about the situation. Our beliefs in turn, drive behaviours and consequently what we do in our injured state. In essence, what we do early on can impact upon the course of the recovery.

In the early stages, having a good understanding of what has happened, what has been injured and the extent of the injury is important from a reassurance viewpoint. Often the responses of the body to an injury are normal yet unpleasant. We need to know what is normal and what may not be normal so that the latter can be dealt with effectively. We also like to know what it is that needs to be done. For these questions to be answered we make a prompt visit to a healthcare professional. Rapid pain relief helps to take a positive stance on managing the early stages and indeed, high levels of uncontrolled pain can lead to beliefs and behaviours that are unhelpful. This is a pertinent point that I would like to emphasise. Gaining a realistic and accurate view of the situation with a good management plan promotes adaptive behaviours and responses that means you are doing everything that you should to support the healing and recovery. Developing fears of movement, catastrophising about the pain and excessively worrying about the injury usually lead to persisting problems. Clearly the former is a better scenario.

In summary, we must think about the early stages of injury management and have a clear strategy. This must include a good explanation of the problem, relevant investigations if required, a management plan that works with the healing process and monitoring of any thinking that could impact upon one’s choices.

03Feb/12

Chronic pain in sport – Specialist Clinic in London

Chronic pain is a real problem in the sporting world. The effects of not being able to participate are far reaching, especially when sport is your profession. There are a huge numbers of clinics offering treatments to deal with pain and injury and in many cases the problem improves. However, there are those who do not progress successfully, resulting in on-going pain, failed attempts to return to playing and varied responses to tissue-based treatment (manual therapy, injections, surgery etc). Understanding more about pain and how your body (brain) continues to protect itself is a really useful start point in moving forwards if you have become stuck. We know that gaining knowledge about the problem can actually improve a clinical test and the pain threshold.

When we injure ourselves playing sport the healing process begins immediately. Chemicals released by the tissues and the immune system are active locally, sealing off the area, dealing with the damaged tissue and setting the stage for rebuilding and repair. The pain asscociated with this phase is expected, normal and unpleasant. It is the unpleasantness that drives you to behave in a protective manner, for example limp, seek advice and treatment. Again, that is normal. Sometimes we can injure ourselves and not know that we have damaged the tissues. There are many stories of this happening when survival or something else is more important. This is because pain is a brain (not mind or ‘in the head’) experience 100% of the time. The brain perceives a threat and then protects the body. If no threat is perceived or it is more important to escape or finish the cup final, the brain is quite capable of releasing chemicals (perhaps 30 times more powerful than morphine) to provide natural pain relief. We know that pain is a brain experience because of phantom limb pain, a terrible situation when pain is felt in a limb that no longer exists. The reason is that we actually ‘feel’ or ‘sense’ our bodies via our virtual body that is mapped out in the brain. This has been mapped out by some clever scientists and in more recent years studies intensely using functional MRI scans of the brain.

Unfortunately, the brain can continue to protect the body with pain and altered movement beyond the time that is really useful. Changes in the properties of the neurons in the central nervous system (central sensitisation) mean that stimuli that are normally innocuous now trigger a painful response as can those outside of the affected area. One way to think about this functionality is that the gain or volume has been turned up, and we know that much of this amplification occurs in the spinal cord, involving both neurons and the immune system. Neurogenic inflammation can also be a feature, where the C-fibres release inflammatory chemicals into the tissues that they supply. On the basis that the brain is really interested in inflammation, even a small inflammatory response can evoke protective measures. Changes in the responsiveness of the ‘danger’ system as briefly described, underpin much of the persisting sensitivity. Altered perception is a further common description, either in the sense that the area is not controlled well or feels somewhat different – see here.

As the problem persists, so thinking and beliefs about the pain and injury can become increasingly negative. Unfortunately this can lead to behaviours that do not promote progression. Avoidance of activities, fear of movement, hypervigilance to signals from the body and catastrophising about the pain are all common features, all of which require addressing with both pain education and positive experiences to develop confidence and deeper understanding. An improvement in the pain level is a great way of starting this process, hence the importance of a tool box of therapies and strategies that target the pain mechanism(s) identified in the assessment.

Experience and plenty of scientific data describe the integration of body, brain and mind. This can no longer be ignored. It is fact. The contemporary biobehavioural approach to chronic and complex pain addresses the pain mechanisms, issues around the problem and the influencing factors in a biopsychosocial sense:

  • Biology: e.g./ physiology of pain, body systems involved in protection, tissue health
  • Psychology: e.g./ fears, anxiety, beliefs about the pain, thinking processes, outlook, coping, past experiences
  • Social: e.g./ work effects, effect upon the family, socialising, role of significant others (spouse, family), financial considerations

Specialist Clinic in London and Surrey for chronic pain and injury in sport – call 07518 445493

Chronic pain and injury requires an all-encompassing biobehavioural approach. Although the end aims can be different, the structure and themes within the treatment programme are similar to those that tackle any chronic pain issue. Bringing these principles into the sports arena, we can incorporate traditional models of care and advance beyond the tissue-based strategies to a way of working that addresses the source of the problem alongside the influencing factors that are slowing or even preventing recovery.

If you as a player are struggling to move forwards or have a player on your team who is not recovering or failing to respond as expected to treatment, we would be very pleased to help you. Call 07518 445 493 or email [email protected] for further infomartion about the clinics:

The Specialist Pain Physio Clinics work closely with the very best Consultants and can organise investigations such as MRI scans and x-rays with reports rapidly, an on-site at the New Malden Diagnostic Centre, 9 Harley Street and in Chelsea.

20Sep/11

Problematic Sports Injuries

Sustaining an injury is a common problem for athletes. Unfortunately, a number of these injuries become enduring and the player struggles to regain fitness and cannot return to play. There are known reasons why this can happen, including the effectiveness of the early management, accurate diagnosis of the problem and how the player initially responds to the injury. All of these factors are important and often accounted for within the medical team’s preparation and planning. It is within the screening process that the medical team can gather such player information. This usually includes the usual fitness parameters, a history of previous problems and how they were managed and past medical history. Beyond these considerations I am interested in certain behavioural and physiological characteristics of the player that will give me an insight into how they will respond to pain and injury.

The problem has usually been persisting for some time when the player comes to the clinic. Beliefs, expectations and concerns will already be flying around his or her head. These emotions can be stoked by failed treatments and a lack of a diagnosis. Certain fundamental adaptations will have occurred as a result of the injury, such as changes in control of movement, altered perception of the affected area, pain felt with innocuous activities and other physiological goings-on that are not consciously observable. These vital functions involve the immune system, endocrine system and autonomic nervous system, all of which have a wide range of effects across body systems and play a significant role in healing, recovery and protection.

Protection is a key point. When you are in pain the body is protecting itself. You may also be aware of spasm or tightness and these are also part of a survival strategy that is orchestrated by the brain. When we are injured or have a problem we usually focus on the pain–and so we should. Pain is a motivator for us to take action to promote recovery. It grabs our attention to the area at risk so that we can attend to the injury. This is an amazing device that means we can learn and adapt. However, when this device adapts and creates sensitivity that is prolonged, it becomes difficult to progress and return to play.

The device is really a network of nerves that communicates information about the health of the tissues to the brain via the spinal cord. These nerves also play a role in maintaining tissue health by releasing certain factors into the tissues. On receiving information from the tissues via the spinal cord, the brain then scrutinises this data and responds appropriately. On perceiving there to be a threat to the tissues, the brain creates pain via a widespread network of neurons becoming active. It is this widespread network of neurons with a range of roles that is the reason for the many influences upon the pain including past experience, emotional state, fear, anxiety, vision, sound, genetics, gender and significance of the perceived danger to name but a few.

Returning to the enduring sports injury, these processes are underpinning the persisting sensitivity that is evoked with normal activities and amplified when pushed harder, altered motor control and perception, sensorimotor mismatch and continued tightness. These are common reasons for non-progression and require addressing with a modern rehabilitation programme that addresses the tissues, the aforementioned body systems and the brain with specific techniques and strategies that are based on the latest neurosciences.

If you would like any further information please do contact us here or call 07518 445493. Click here for our programme details.

12Sep/11

Physiotherapy Clinic in Chelsea

Situated just off Sloane Square in Chelsea at 2, Lower Sloane Street, the physiotherapy clinic is in a convenient location close to the tube (Sloane Square) and bus stops. The Specialist Pain Physio Clinics are dedicated to treating pain and injury with modern strategies and therapies based upon the latest neuroscience to promote normal movement and healthy participation in an active lifestyle.

T 07518 445493

Physiotherapy in Chelsea for pain

Visit the profile on The Chelsea Consulting Room website that provides a brief outline of the clinic. The main Specialist Pain Physio website has details about the modern approach to the treatment of pain and chronic pain, the other clinic locations and links to useful sites.

Knowledge and healthy movement for normal self

Specialist Physiotherapy in Chelsea

Local residents, people from all parts of London, across the country and overseas visitors have come to the clinic for treatment of chronic conditions and pain.

Come and visit our blog for regular articles and information.

We see a range of complaints including back pain, neck pain, RSI, recurring and persisting sports injuries, complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), tendinopathies (e.g./ Achilles, patella, shoulder, elbow & wrist), functional pain syndromes (e.g./ IBS, dysmenorrhoea, pelvic pain, fibromyalgia, chronic back pain), conditions that have failed to respond to treatment and medically unexplained symptoms.

T 07518 445493

21Jul/11

Treatment Update

Come and see the updated treatment programme page. We are regularly updating the site so do check back. This is when there is new knowledge or research that adds to our understanding of pain and how we can best treat on-going problems.