Tag Archives: Richmond Stace

15Jun/15

My pain story

Richmond Stace MCSP MSc (Pain) BSc (Hons)

People ask me how and why I work in chronic and complex pain, and often follow-up with the question of whether I experience on-going pain. Here’s my pain story.

In the early 90’s I trained to be a Registered Nurse. This was not a career that I wished to pursue, however the training was a wonderful three years spent learning about what it is to be human. I made it my business to see as much as I could, go to as many places as I could, gathering the most incredible experiences that now I deem to be of the upmost value.

It was this early introduction to illness, disease, dying, death and life that I realised some years later, to be the sculptor of my values and beliefs. Of course being 19 years old at the time, I did not fully appreciate what I was submerging myself into, yet somehow I did know that it was important to push myself into difficult situations. These you face consistently in healthcare, particularly as a nurse on the wards and in the community. Working with people who are being pushed to their extremes gives you an appreciation of life itself.

It was whilst I was a student nurse that the concept of pain grabbed my interest. Why did different people respond in different ways? Now it is far clearer having spent the last 19 years thinking about and studying pain. However, at the time I was baffled and surrounded by explanations that were based on the body and structures–the biomedical model, which still predominates today sadly.

Between nursing and physiotherapy I read a degree in Sport Rehabilitation as I thought that this would fill the gap. I loved sport and this seemed like a happy union. Interesting as it was, I felt that I needed to be a physiotherapist and so I trooped off to physio school. This is where it all started to fall into place when I attended a lecture on pain given by Dr Mick Thacker. It was a massive ‘aha’ moment, and I never looked back. The session focused on the mechanisms of pain, and even at that early stage I realised the potential for understanding the variable and contextual nature of pain. Mick’s on-going input that came directly from his vast experience and immense knowledge grooved a way forward that was immediately applicable in the clinic. It was so exciting to be able to appreciate what was happening biologically to manifest in the way that pain can and does.

Since this time, I have continued to look at pain in many different ways. This was propelled by continuing to work under Mick’s tutorage in the form of the Pain MSc at Kings College London. Not only did we explore the depths of pain, what it is, what it means and how it comes about, but we also learned how to think and ask questions. I will never forget having to role-play with Mick in front of the group whilst he took the part of a patient. It was a fine performance on his part.

The Pain MSc at Kings College was some years ago now, but the grounding from all my experiences to date, and these are of course on-going, has really created my ‘physio-self’ but also my ‘self-self’ as I explore neuroscience, cognitive sciences, philosophy and other fields to understand what it is to be human. To understand this I believe, is to get to the root of the pain experience but also the plethora of conscious experiences that we embody every day.

The answer to the question of whether I feel pain and experience on-going pain is yes. The advantage of my understanding is that I can play myself certain messages that help, i.e. reduce the threat, and take action that I purport on a daily basis. It is always interesting to consider how pain clinicians and pain scientists perceive pain, and how this could be different to a non-clinician/scientist. There is a whole blog to be written on this subject!

RS

Richmond specialises in treating and coaching individuals to overcome their chronic and complex pain using a programme called ‘Pain Coach’. Pain Coach is a comprehensive programme that addresses all dimensions of pain in an integrated manner; i.e. considering the whole person and all the body systems contributions to the emergence of pain. Pain Coach training is available for clinicians in small groups and as 1:1 mentoring. For more details, please visit the home page or call 07518 445493.

28Jan/15

Specialist treatment for pain

Richmond M. Stace Specialist Physiotherapist & Pain Coach

Richmond M. Stace
Specialist Physiotherapist & Pain Coach

Pain is the largest global health burden. Those who suffer persisting pain will understand why, as the impact of pain creeps into every corner of your life. Fortunately we have a far greater understanding of the science of pain now, and hence increasingly effective ways of tackling the problem.

My background is in pain neuroscience and physiotherapy. I have also studied rehabilitation and general nursing, and the blend of these four disciplines has led to my modern approach to dealing with pain, and in particular chronic or persisting pain. The treatments, the rehabilitation strategies and pain coach concept have been created on the basis of the latest sciences and my experience in healthcare for over 20 years.

The treatment, training and coaching programme

I focus on working with people who suffer persisting pain. This is not limited to musculoskeletal pain, but any chronic pain problem, for example irritable bowel syndrome and migraine. Together we comprehensively explore how you have come to be in a state of persisting pain, identify the pain mechanisms and the factors in your life that influence the pain. This creates the opportunity to tackle the pain at a number of levels. This is important as we know that pain is multi-system (pain involves all body systems) and multi-dimensional (the dimensions are physical, cognitive and emotional; these interact and are not exclusive). To fully address the pain problem, all of these factors must be considered, which is why your programme is detailed and bespoke according to your needs and circumstances.

You may have decided to deal with an on-going problem or you may have tried different approaches before. Whatever your start point, the over-arching aim is for you to understand your pain and to learn how you can overcome the problem with a range of strategies, treatments, and training. The programme is built for you, allowing you to become your own ‘coach’ so that you think clearly about your pain and make decisions that lead to long-lasting and transformational changes to your life. You will be inspired and motivated by the work we do in your sessions to take the healthy choice, creating a sense of wellbeing so that you live a meaningful life.

Call us now to start your programme: 07518 445493

Richmond’s clinics are in Harley Street, Chelsea and New Malden.

 

05Jan/15

Richmond Stace | Specialist Pain Physiotherapist

Richmond Stace | Specialist Pain Physiotherapist

Richmond Stace | Specialist Pain Physiotherapist

About Specialist Pain Physio Clinics

In 2006, I started the Specialist Pain Physio Clinic concept in London and Surrey to provide contemporary and innovative physiotherapy for chronic pain and injury.

I believe and know that pain can and does change when the right conditions are created in both thought and action. Blending the latest neuroscience of pain with tried and tested mentoring techniques, together we comprehensively address the biology of your pain and the influences upon your pain.

Let’s aim high and target success with the right thinking, a vision of where you want to be and a definite plan of how to achieve your success.

Effective treatment, training and mentoring for health and performance — it is time to change..
My physiotherapy treatment, proactive training and mentoring programmes are based upon the latest sciences and understanding of pain. The biopsychosocial approach that I use is the contemporary way of addressing enduring pain and suffering — considering the biology, psychology and social impact.

Richmond Stace MCSP MSc (Pain) BSc (Hons)

I am a Chartered Physiotherapist and registered with the Health Professions Council. Originally training as a Registered General Nurse, I developed an interest in pain whilst observing the varying responses in recovery after operations. I continued to train as a physiotherapist, I have a further degree in Sport Rehabilitation and a Masters Degree in Pain Science. My passion is in providing the best journey for you by using the latest therapies for chronic and complex pain. Seeing and hearing about your relief from symptoms, your development of healthy habits and sustained change is my aim for you.

Outside of the clinic, I write and talk about how we can globally change pain by understanding it, communicating about pain accurately, creating a definite plan and how to implement the plan in the most effective way.

I am on the editorial team for the Physiotherapy Pain Association (PPA), a member of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), The Royal Society of Medicine and the Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists.

25Mar/14

Beyond the biomedical model of pain – an interview with Richmond Stace

physiospotRecently I was interviewed by Rachael from Physiopedia and Physiospot. We discussed some of the areas I feel are important in tackling the problem of pain, in particular chronic pain.

Click here for the interview

Primarily the topic focus was the psychosocial aspects of pain, an area that has provoked increasing interest. The word is often used but I find in practice that the social or societal influences upon pain are rarely included in a treatment programme. The most obvious example is the way in which a couple live and interact and how this impacts upon pain. Culture and gender both play a significant role in how pain is perceived, experienced and treated.

Of course the psychosocial elements are not in isolation to the physical and in fact I would argue that they are as biological as movement or nociception. All our experiences are constructed by the brain and involve neuronal activity driven by chemicals.

The understanding of pain sciences has moved on dramatically over the past 5-10 years but sadly the management trails behind, held back by old fashioned thinking and views based on out-dated thinking. We have an obligation to reconceptualise the way we deal with pain because the information exists and there are vast numbers of people who need to know that they can both control and change their pain.

Specialist Pain Physio Clinics in London for chronic pain, pain and injury