Tag Archives: physiotherapy

21Jan/17
Engaged physiotherapy

Engaged physiotherapy for pain

Engaged physiotherapy for pain and the modern world

Engaged physiotherapyEngaged physiotherapy is an approach embracing full awareness of oneself as a clinician, full awareness of the person you are working with, full awareness of the context and past, compassion (self and others), insight, and modern sciences (the facts ~ what we know). I have ‘borrowed’ the term from Thich Nhat Hanh who describes engaged Buddhism, which is the practical use of the philosophical principles such as mindfulness, mindful breathing and mindful walking.

Cultivating our awareness as clinicians and gaining insight into the causes of suffering affords us the opportunity to think clearly about the best action for the individual, in this case in pain. Together with an understanding an use of modern sciences, especially pain science, cognitive science and neuroscience (there is vast overlap of course), and philosophy, we can consider each person’s story and create a way onward that is grounded in understanding, compassion, belief and the right attitude to succeed.

There are simple practices that clinicians can use each day that develop and grow awareness and insight. Here are some examples:

  • The greeting
  • Being present during a consultation using the breath
  • Deep and active listening
  • Compassionate speech
  • The creation of a calm and peaceful environment
The greeting

The initial contact often sets the scene. We can think about how we present ourselves with posturing, gestures, language and the simple smile. I would suggest always going to the patient to greet them in the waiting area, and behaving very much like you are welcoming an old friend into your home.

Being present

Using the breath we remain present and aware of what is happening right now. What is passing through me (my mind)? Any bias? Preconception? Judgement? Being aware allows us to let these go so we can focus on active and deep listening. Practicing mindful breathing each day formally for 5-10 minutes helps us to develop this skill that we can use through the day, every day for professional and personal relations to benefit

Deep listening

One of the most valuable gifts we can give to another person is ourselves and our time. Being fully present to listen to the patient (or colleague or family member or friend) creates the conditions for a meaningful interaction. All involved parties benefit from meaningful interactions as we release certain healthy chemicals in these contexts. In deep listening we can hear and understand the suffering of the other, enabling the best and wisest course of action, which may simply be to continue to listen without interruption. Learning to be comfortable with silence is a valuable skill. Much can emerge from moments of silence. (Reading here)

Compassionate speech

Choosing our words carefully, considering their effects, is an important skill to develop. The words we utter have potent effects on others as they hear, process, imagine, think and react. Of course using kind, compassionate words can create the conditions for calm and insight, enabling the person to see a way forward. A focus on health and being well maintains the desired direction, hence the use of words that encourage this thinking and vision helps the person to orientate themselves towards a desired outcome.

We have the spoken word and we have the inner dialogue. Being skilful with both is important as we need to consider which thoughts we are fuelling, or which seeds we are watering by the way we think and what we say. An example would be the effects of engaging in idle gossip. In the long-term, gossip can create issues of trust and miscommunication that breeds suffering.

As a clinician, we should always be thinking about delivering the right messages based on truth, and that provide a compassionate way forward. Helping the patient develop their skills of self-compassion is frequently needed in cases of chronic pain. Understanding that self-compassion is one of the skills of well being helps individuals to practice and benefit from the nurturing of the care-giving systems in the body that play such a big part in our health and happiness.

Creating a calm environment

We are very responsive to the environment. Consider how you would feel working in an office with no windows and in the basement of a block compared to an office with a view over a park or a river.

Clinicians need to think about how the patient might think and feel coming into the clinic. We seek to create a peaceful space for people to experience feelings of calm and gain insight into how they can be, how they can transform their state of being and how they can use these practices in their day to day lives.

The simple practices are just some of the ways we can use our knowledge and skills to create the conditions for people to get better. We no longer have to think about managing or coping, instead use engaged physiotherapy and approaches to give people the belief, understanding and skills to coach themselves, fostering independence and a sense of agency, restoring choice and meaningful living.

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These practices are part of the Pain Coach Programme, which is a focus upon getting better and achieving success in overcoming pain. The programme for patients is a comprehensive way forward addressing a pain problem by focusing on getting healthy and well, and the programme for clinicians is to develop their skills and knowledge to coach patients. If you would like further information, please email us: [email protected] or call 07518 445493.

22May/16
Hands

The physiotherapist’s hands

Physiotherapist's handsSynonymous with physiotherapy are exercises and hands-on treatments. And rightly so, because these are our basic interventions that we are expert in delivering. However, it is not just the manual therapy and massage that we use our hands for in the clinic. No, no. There is much more as I will describe below as we consider the diverse role of the physiotherapist’s hands.

The hand shake

In many cases, we shake hands with the patient at the start and end of their session. A hand shake is important and must be right — don’t crush the other person’s hand but equally there needs to be some firmness to communicate confidence and sincerity. The hand shake is accompanied by an appropriate greeting, definitely a smile and followed by an invitation to enter the room or sit down. Think about how you would invite someone into your home, wanting them to feel welcome and comfortable. Not everyone receives a hand shake though, so a different gesture is used to imply the same welcome.

The welcome gesture

Hand shake or not, we indicate that the person can enter the room or sit down by gesturing towards the door or chair. A soft, smooth movement obvious enough for the person to understand your message, and soon the person will feel more relaxed, particularly if you use some words of welcome.

Gesticulation

When talking I use a great deal of gesticulation, both with patients and when lecturing. It is thought that we gesticulate to reduce the cognitive load on the brain — one of many ways that we think by using our body (embodied cognition). Moving one’s hands, we do this to make a point, to act, to demonstrate a movement, to point, to emphasise, to distract, to guide, to communicate, to sympathise….and much more. We can learn to use these movements with great skill as part of the art of communication. So much of our work as physiotherapists is about communication, whether this be helping someone understand their pain, move in a different way, create calm or guiding a mindful practice.

Washing our hands

This is a demonstration of cleanliness and the patient seeing this act is important. We can also use it as a natural break, feeling the pleasure of running water and a light massaging effect.

Writing and typing

There is always plenty to type and write. I have an online note taking system, which means that I type whilst the patient talks but I use a paper body chart to scribble notes about the symptoms. My hands are well occupied with these tasks, transmitting the patient’s words onto the screen or the chart without thought as I concentrate on the story that they tell me.

Guiding movement, reassuring touch and pointing

We may support a body area, or lightly apply pressure to guide the patient as he or she re-trains normal movement. Pointing to where the person needs to stand, signalling the direction of movement and gesturing encouragement are all important jobs for our hands.

Clapping, punching the air, slap on the back…

I love to celebrate someone’s success and will choose an appropriate action along with congratulatory words. It is important that the person knows that their efforts have resulted in successfully overcoming their pain problem. Praising the work that they have done, their courage and resilience will make them feel good about what they have achieved.

Wave

Goodbye for now.

Pain Coach 1:1 Mentoring Programme for clinicians and therapists | t. 07518 445493

20Jul/15
Kitty Terwolbeck
| https://flic.kr/p/nJ3oH4

Zen and the art of human maintenance

Kitty Terwolbeck | https://flic.kr/p/nJ3oH4

Kitty Terwolbeck
| https://flic.kr/p/nJ3oH4

Zen and the art of human maintenance is not a spiritual blog but rather a practical one that considers a way of approaching hands on treatment–this is whether you are a massage therapist, a physiotherapist, an osteopath or any other clinician who uses their hands for examination and treatment. Equally it could apply to a person comforting a loved one.

How you bring yourself to the act has a huge impact upon the act itself. Setting the scene both in terms of the environment and the focus of your intention will play out through the treatment in subtle ways that effect the overall experience. A moment’s preparation in that vain allows the therapist to focus and be present meaning that the full experience is had, allowing for a sensitivity (via the therapist’s hands yet experienced through their whole person) that enables gentle responsiveness to adapt the treatment to the recipient’s needs. A classic example is being aware of how the muscles react to different levels of touch. Being aware means that you can detect even gentle guarding that indicates protection and need for both nourishment (improved blood flow and oxygen delivery to over-working muscles that are being told to tighten in an attempt to protect–yet this comes at a cost, both of energy and a build up of acids) and a sense of safety so that the systems that are protecting the body can ease up.

Take a moment: before you begin the treatment, 3 easy breaths to become aware of what is happening now, how you are feeling, what you are thinking; continue to maintain awareness of the present moment, letting go of distracting thoughts that interfere with your focus.

Zen is a sense of oneness with the present experience, what is happening right now, free from distractions and letting life flow. There are many situations when this state of simply being is very useful–before exams, interviews, when negotiating, discussions with your employer, before performing etc. However, cultivating this skill on a moment to moment basis is hugely beneficial as it allows you to see and think clearly, even when thinking about the past or future, which can cloud what is really happening now. These are all just thoughts, but when we become embroiled, the body reacts and responds because we are our body as much as we are our mind, and all that this means. So, just thinking about being in an argument or giving a speech creates similar responses in the body as if you are there; but you are not.

In giving treatment to another person, being fully present means that you fully experience the moment. You will be completely engaged in all that is happening ‘now’, creating a potency that cannot be otherwise reached with a wandering mind that has no connection with the treatment. This is undoubtedly a practical skill that can be developed, some calling it ‘focused attention training’ and others ‘mindfulness’. Everyone has the ability to focus, even for short periods, and to enhance the skill with practice. There would be some benefit of simply taking a few breaths as described above, yet there is even greater advantages to be had from further practice with 5-10 minutes of mindful breathing each day; more if you are so inclined.

Not only does being present whilst treating enhance the treatment through a more responsive selection of pressures and movements, the clinician also benefits from the calm created, and the clarity of thoguht offered by being present and aware. In effect, the whole experiecne means that while you are treating, you are being treated. A good way to measure this is by noting how you feel at the end of the day. A mindful day will end with energy, and non-mindful day with fatigue. I know which I prefer.

* These are skills to be learned and developed in the Pain Coach Mentoring Programme for clinicians | call 07518 445493 for details

25Mar/14
physiospot

Beyond the biomedical model of pain – an interview with Richmond Stace

physiospotRecently I was interviewed by Rachael from Physiopedia and Physiospot. We discussed some of the areas I feel are important in tackling the problem of pain, in particular chronic pain.

Click here for the interview

Primarily the topic focus was the psychosocial aspects of pain, an area that has provoked increasing interest. The word is often used but I find in practice that the social or societal influences upon pain are rarely included in a treatment programme. The most obvious example is the way in which a couple live and interact and how this impacts upon pain. Culture and gender both play a significant role in how pain is perceived, experienced and treated.

Of course the psychosocial elements are not in isolation to the physical and in fact I would argue that they are as biological as movement or nociception. All our experiences are constructed by the brain and involve neuronal activity driven by chemicals.

The understanding of pain sciences has moved on dramatically over the past 5-10 years but sadly the management trails behind, held back by old fashioned thinking and views based on out-dated thinking. We have an obligation to reconceptualise the way we deal with pain because the information exists and there are vast numbers of people who need to know that they can both control and change their pain.

Specialist Pain Physio Clinics in London for chronic pain, pain and injury

20Jul/13

Creating the right conditions to move forward

3 key points

1. Nothing happens in isolation.

2. We are designed to change, grow and develop.

3. Nothing is permanent.

Bearing these fundamental points in mind, we seek to create and then cultivate the right conditions so that we may move forward in life. In terms of rehabilitation, we also look to create the conditions to achieve wellness that manifests in an ability to perform at home, at work and on the field of play.

Nothing happens in isolation: we are on a continuous pathway with an underpinning genetic make up that is sculpted by our experiences and environment (epigenetics). So when we experience a pain or an injury, the immediate physiological and behavioural responses that so affect the pain perception, will be determined by what we know and by what our brain knows (we do not know all the things that our brain knows. Or our nose knows). When designing and implementing a training programme for a painful condition, this is an important principle as the patient will have a story leading to the point when they exercise that will determine the response including what they have done physically, how they are feeling and what they are thinking. Anticipation and expectation must be addressed.

We are designed to change: neuroplasticity is a feature of the neuroimmune system that allows us to learn and change. However, the mindset around this is key. We must understand the we can change and have a belief that it is possible in order to behave in a way that will promote forward movement in life. This must be addressed in any rehabilitation programme and indeed it may be that thinking needs to be ‘rehabilitated’ as well.

Nothing is permanent: the concept of impermanence comes from Buddhism. Nothing is permanent, even pain and other symptoms. They change as does our thinking, emotional state and body sense. We may not think it does and particularly in suffering on-going pain. However, the intensity, quality, location and nature of pain changes regularly and this is because the neuroimmune system is dynamic, ever-responding to the internal and external environments. This is why the context of the situation is so key in pain. We must think about this in rehabilitation: the context of the training.

In summary, the natural processes within the body are simply designed for us. To maximise their potential we must create the right conditions for these processes to act and this means considering the physical, cognitive and emotional dimensions of the pain experience and how they interact. A single leg squat is a single leg squat, but what is the person thinking about the single leg squat, have they done it before, will the brain consider it to be safe, where are they doing it, when are they doing it……..the list of considerations goes on. Lets consider them.

For further information about our treatment and training programmes or to book your first session, call us on 07932 689081

05Nov/12

Women and pain | Part 1

 

‘As many as 50 million American women live with one or more neglected and poorly understood chronic pain conditions’ 

Generally I see more female patients than male. This observation supports the view that chronic pain is more prevalent in women than in men for some conditions – see the International Association for the Study of Pain fact sheet here. There are some ideas as to why this may be, including the role of the sex hormones and psychosocial factors such as emotion, coping strategies and roles in life. Additionally, experimental studies have shown that women have lower pain thresholds (this is a physiological reading) and tolerance to a range of pain stimuli when compared to men although this does not clarify that women actually feel more pain – see here. Pain is a subjective experience of course, and modulated by many factors.

A campaign for women’s pain | Chronic pain in women (2010) report

It is not uncommon for a female patient to tell me about her back pain and continue the narrative towards other body areas that hurt and cause problems. This may include pelvic pain, migraine, headache, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic knee pain, widespread sensitivity and gynaecological problems (including dysmenorrhoea, endometriosis and difficulty conceiving). These seemingly varied conditions are typically looked after by a range of medical and surgical disciplines: gynaecology, neurology, rheumatology, gastroenterology and orthopaedics. More recent science and thinking has started to join the dots on these problems, offering new insight into the underpinning mechanisms and more importantly approaches that can affect all the conditions in a positive way. This is certainly my thinking on this hugely significant matter.

Reconceptualising pain

Undoubtedly pain is complex. This is particularly the case when pain persists, disrupting and impacting upon life. Reconceptualising pain according to modern neuroscience is making a real difference to how we think and treat pain – see this video. Briefly, thinking of pain as an output from the brain as a result of a complex interaction of circumstance, biology, thought, emotion and memory begins to give an insight into the workings of the brain and body. Pain is individual, it is in the ‘now’ but so coloured by the past and what it may mean to the individual. The context or situation in which the pain arises is so very important. We talk about pain from the brain but of course we really feel it in our physical bodies, but the location is where the brain is projecting the sensation – see this video.

Neuroscience has shown us that the danger signals from the body tissues are significantly modulated by the brain before the end output is experienced. Factors that influence the messages include attention, expectation and the circustance in which the individual finds herself. We have powerful mechanisms that can both facilitate and inhibit the flow of these signals and these reside within the brain and brain stem. For this reason we must consider the person’s situation, their expectations, hopes, goals, past experiences and current difficulties, and how these can affect their current pain.

Stress & emotion

Any hugely emotive issue within someone’s life can impact enormously upon pain and sensitivity. This can be the stress of a situation including caring for a relative, losing someone close, work related issues and divorce. The problem of conception certainly features in a number of cases that I see, causing stress and turmoil for both partners but clearly in different ways. Fertility receives a great deal of attention in the media and there are a many clinics offering treatment and therapies, in effect raising awareness and attention levels towards the problem. The pain caused by difficulties having children can manifest physically through the stress that is created by the situation. Thoughts, feeling and emotions are nerve impulses in the brain like any other and will trigger physical responses including tension. Stress physiology affects all body systems, for example the gastrointestinal system (e.g./ irritable bowel), nervous system (e.g. headaches, back pain) and the immune system (e.g. repeated infections).

Lifestyle

Lifestyle factors play a significant role in persisting pain. Modern technology and habits that we form easily may not be helpful when we have a sensitive nervous system. For example, sedentary work, the light from computer screens, pressures at work, limited exercise, poor diet, binge drinking and smoking to name but a few. All are toxic in some way as can be our own thinking about ourselves. When we have a thought, and we have thousands each day, and we pay attention, becoming absorbed in the process, the brain reacts as if we are actually in that situation. Consequently we have physical and emotional responses that can be repeated over and over when we dwell on the same thinking. This is rumination and is likely due to ‘hyper-connectivity’ between certain brain areas – see here. We can challenge this in several ways including by changing our thinking and using mindfulness, both of which will alter brain activity and dampen these responses. It does take practice but the benefits are attainable for everyone.

In summary, the underlying factors that must be addressed are individual and both physical and psychological. Pain is complex and personal, potentially affecting many different areas of life. How we live our lives, what we think and how we feel are all highly relevant in the problem of pain as borne out of sensible thinking and the neuroscience of pain. Understanding the pain, learning strategies to reduce the impact, receiving treatment that targets the underlying mechanisms, making healthy changes to lifestyle and developing good habits alongside the contemporary brain based therapies can make a huge difference and provide a route forwards.

For information on our ‘join the dots’ treatment programmes for chronic pain, contact us here or call 07932 689081

 

11Jul/12

Cervical Dystonia | What can we do?

I see a number of cases of cervical dystonia (spasmodic torticollis) that features awkward posturing and movement of the head and neck. This can be painful and have consequences for normal activities. We rely upon being able to orientate ourselves to our environment by controlling our head and gaze direction and then responding appropriately.

Primary dystonia has no neurological or metabolic cause whereas secondary dystonia is attributable to outside factors such as physical trauma, exposure to certain medications and other neurological or metabolic diseases.

Here is a fact sheet from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders & Stroke

Common treatment of cervical dystonia includes botulinum toxin injections and physiotherapy.

Modern physiotherapy for cervical dystonia at the Specialist Pain Physio Clinics

In addition to the manual techniques that are used to help ease tension and the soreness associated with spasm and tightness in the muscles, we use strategies that target the motor centres in the brain where the signals are coming from. In other words, as well as treating the symptoms, we are focusing upon the mechanisms and causes of the muscles going into spasm. The Graded Motor Imagery programme provides a way of aiming to retrain movement by targeting the adaptations that have occured in the motor system. Initially this programme was devised for complex regional pain syndrome, but since then the training has been found to help those with a range of painful problems with associated movement issues.

Typically a treatment programme includes themes that aim to develop a deep understanding of the problem(s), nourish and mobilise the body tissues, improve motor control, body sense and awareness, manage posture, increase exercise an activity tolerance and ultimately improve quality of life. We call the approach biobehavioural because it is a comprehensive way of tackling the issues and influencing factors that are unique to the individual, addressing the physical signs and symptoms as much as the underpinning beliefs and lifestyle factors that impact.

Call for appointments: 07518 445493

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Dr Marie-Helene Marion, a consultant neurologist specialising in the treatment of dystonia and movement disorders has a comprehensive blog here

Recent research papers

Behav Neurol. 2012 May 24.

Cervical dystonia: From pathophysiology to pharmacotherapy.

Patel S, Martino D.

Abstract

Background: Dystonia is a chronic disorder characterised by an aberration in the control of movement. Sustained co-contraction of opposing agonist and antagonist muscles can cause repetitive and twisting movements, or abnormal postures. Cervical dystonia (CD), often referred to as spasmodic torticollis, is a type of focal dystonia involving the muscles of the neck and sometimes the shoulders. Methods: This systematic review collates the available evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of a range of treatments for CD, focusing on their effectiveness as shown by double-blinded, randomised controlled trials. Results: Our review suggests that botulinum toxin type A (BTA), botulinum toxin type B (BTB) and trihexyphenidyl are safe and efficacious treatments for CD. Evidence shows that botulinum toxin therapies are more reliable for symptomatic relief and have fewer adverse effects than trihexyphenidyl. When comparing BTA to BTB, both are found to have similar clinical benefits, with BTA possibly having a longer duration of action and a marginally better side effect profile. BTB is also safe and probably just as efficacious a treatment in those patients who are unresponsive or have become resistant to BTA.

Discussion: The current evidence shows that the pharmacological management of CD relies on BTA and BTB, two agents with established efficacy and tolerability profiles.

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Lancet Neurol. 2002 Sep;1(5):316-25.

Classification and genetics of dystonia.

de Carvalho Aguiar PM, Ozelius LJ.

Abstract

Dystonia is a syndrome characterised by sustained muscle contractions, producing twisting, repetitive, and patterned movements, or abnormal postures. The dystonic syndromes include a large group of diseases that have been classified into various aetiological categories, such as primary, dystonia-plus, heredodegenerative, and secondary. The diverse clinical features of these disorders are reflected in the traditional clinical classification based on age at onset, distribution of symptoms, and site of onset. However, with an increased awareness of the molecular and environmental causes, the classification schemes have changed to reflect different genetic forms of dystonia. To date, at least 13 dystonic syndromes have been distinguished on a genetic basis and their loci are referred to as DYT1 to DYT13. This review focuses on the molecular and phenotypic features of the hereditary dystonias, with emphasis on recent advances.

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Mov Disord. 2002;17 Suppl 3:S49-62.

Pathophysiology of dystonia: a neuronal model.

Vitek JL.

Abstract

Dystonia has commonly been thought to represent a disorder of basal ganglia function. Although long considered a hyperkinetic movement disorder, the evidence to support such a classification was based on the presence of excessive involuntary movement, not on physiological data. Only recently, with the return of surgical procedures using microelectrode guidance for the treatment of dystonia, has electrophysiological data demonstrated an alteration in mean discharge rate, somatosensory responsiveness and the pattern of neuronal activity in the basal ganglia thalamocortical motor circuit. Previous models of dystonia suggested that reduced mean discharge rates in the globus pallidus internus (GPi) led to unopposed increases in activity in the thalamocortical circuit that precipitated the development of involuntary movement associated with dystonia. This model has subsequently been modified given the clear improvement in dystonic symptoms following lesions in the GPi, a procedure that is associated with a further reduction in pallidal output. The improvement in dystonia following pallidal lesions is difficult to reconcile with the “rate” hypothesis for hypokinetic and hyperkinetic movement disorders and has led to the development of alternative models that, in addition to rate, incorporate changes in pattern, somatosensory responsiveness and degree of synchronization of neuronal activity. Present models of dystonia, however, must not only take these changes into account but must reconcile these changes with the reported changes in cortical excitability reported with transcranial magnetic stimulation, the changes in metabolic activity in cortical and subcortical structures documented by positron emission tomography (PET), and the alterations in spinal and brainstem reflexes. A model incorporating these changes together with the reported changes in neuronal activity in the basal ganglia and thalamus is presented.

04Apr/12

Reconceptualising pain for better treatment – a revolution? A revelation?

Traditionally pain is understood to be an unpleasant experience in the body where a problem exists, and is something to be got rid of as quickly as possible. The so-called ‘biomedical model’ considers which structures require treatment or surgery, stopping at the tissues as the cause of pain. This paradigm has been challenged over the years and rightly so in the light of recent research. Many studies have revealed the underlying physiology within the nervous system, and in particular the brain, and the role of other body systems such as the immune system and endocrine system (hormones) in pain. Understanding that pain is a normal response to a perceived threat has helped mould new treatments and ways of dealing with pain.

The most pertinent discovery and emergent shift in thinking came when it was realised that pain is a brain experience. This came via studies of the brain but also by looking at why phantom limb pain exists and how people present with a range of injuries and such varied levels of reported pain. There are many stories of people suffering severe physical injury yet experience little or no pain at the time.

The fact that we know pain is a brain experience has helped us to understand the many influences upon the pain, especially one’s emotional state. For instance, we know that the danger signals that are sent by the body to the brain via the spinal cord, travel to the emotional centres of the brain to try and give some meaning to the pain. These signals reach the brain and receive scrutiny to work out the level of threat, and this can vary enormously depending upon a range of factors. On activating a widespread group of neurons termed the ’pain matrix’, the output from the brain, a response, can be the pain experience. Knowing that there are many parts of the brain involved has meant that there are now a range of approaches that can tackle the problem of pain.

We are now far more optimistic about treating pain. This is not just with medication, which does have a role when used wisely, but with a range of contemporary treatments, strategies and techniques that address the underpinning mechanisms at a tissue level, spinal cord level and a brain level alongside beliefs, attitudes and behaviours that can be moulded to change the pain. The term used to describe the contemporary approach to pain is ’biopsychosocial’, implying a role for the overlapping biological, psychological and social factors that must be addressed.

22Mar/12

Training for the marathon – developing pain & injury

At this time of year, as the London Marathon nears, runners reaching new levels of training can start to develop aches and pains. Usually the pains are in the legs or feet and often begin as an annoyance but develop into a problem that means training has to stop.

The tissues are constantly breaking down and rebuilding. This is a carefully orchestrated process that is impacted upon by exercise. This is how we develop muscle bulk. However, we do need a period of adaptation that can be disrupted if there is inadequate rest. The balance tips towards tissue breakdown and inflammation triggers the development of sensitivity that if ignored can progress and become amplified. A good training programme should account for both rest periods and gradual progression of intensity.

A second issue is that of control of movement. On a day to day basis we can walk around, undertake normal activities, play sports and even run for certain distances with minor motor control issues. Motor control refers to the way in which our body is controlled by the brain with a feedback-feedforward system. The tissues send information to the brain so that there is a sense of position and awareness, allowing for the next movement to be made and corrected if necessary. The problem lies in the increasing distances, often never reached before, that can highlight these usually minor issues. Compensation and extra strain upon muscles and tendons that are trying to do the job of another can lead to tissue breakdown as explained previously. The sensitivity builds and training becomes difficult.

A full assessment of the affected area, body sense and the way in which movement is controlled will reveal factors that need addressing with treatment and specific exercises. This fits alongside a likely modification in the training programme that allows for the sensitivity to reduce before progressing once more. In some cases a scan or other investigations are recommend to determine the tissue nature of the problem.

If you are starting to develop consistent twinges that are worsening, pain that is affecting training or you are concerned, you should seek advice.

For appointments at one of the clinics please call 07518 445493

  • 9 Harley Street
  • The Chelsea Consulting Rooms
  • Temple
  • New Malden Diagnostic Centre
12Mar/12

Football Injury Blog @Footymatters

Footy Matters

I am really excited to be writing a regular blog on the Footy Matters website looking at injuries in football.

Injury Time with Richmond Stace

About Footy Matters

Footy Matters is an online football magazine like no other. We’ll be bringing you sharp commentary on the latest football news, providing unique insight, views and opinions away from the mainstream.

Our aim is to inform and educate with well researched and well written content you won’t find in the crowded football blog-osphere and that is tailor-made for the thinking football fan.

Footy Matters is your place to share, discuss and debate every aspect of the beautiful game.

Thinking Football

The Thinking Football ethos is Footy Matters’ approach to everything we write. We’re not interested in Wags, Heat magazine gossip or what players wear or drive – for us it’s all about the game.

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You can follow Footy Matters on Twitter @footymatters