Tag Archives: pain

05Feb/15
Persisting sports injuries

Today’s talk at QMUL | pain in sport

Today’s talk at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) for the MSc Sports & Exercise Medicine group focused on modern concepts of pain, in particular the problem of persisting pain. Using plenty of clinical examples and anecdotes, we explored a range of topics including:

  • The enormous (global) issue of pain
  • The dimensions of pain (physical – cognitive -emotional)
  • The importance of the whole person as much as the condition
  • The relevance of the meaning of pain to the individual and how this flavours the pain experience
  • The vital early messages when we talk to someone with pain, and how this can shape their thinking and actions
  • The importance of using the science of pain in dealing with sports injuries.

Richmond holds clinics for pain and chronic pain problems in Harley Street, Chelsea and New Malden

If you would like Richmond to come to your practice and talk about pain and chronic pain, please contact Jo on 07518 445493.

09Jan/15
Bono's injury

Bono’s arm

Bono's injuryAnyone who has read Bono’s recent post will know that he believes that he may not play his guitar again. As a rock and roll icon, this is a strong message that reveals the mortality of man.

Many times I have heard people tell me that they cannot do what they used to do. This is usually because of pain or a physical limitation. Often this pain and limitation has been in existence for some time before they come to see me, and hence the body has physically adapted, thinking has narrowed and avoidance assumes the default position. For this reason, the early messages about pain and injury are a vital because they set the scene for the action taken.

I do not know the full details about Bono’s arm aside from reports in the media. The injury sounded complex and nasty, requiring surgery to fix the damage. Healing always ensues, pain usually accompanies healing as do a range of other biological mechanisms such as change in movement, change in thinking and responses to different environments. Additionally we can feel unwell (the sickness response), our mood can vary, sleep is disrupted with knock-on effects, appetite may change and thinking can lose clarity. There is a very individual response to an injury, especially when it affects something very important to our self.

When helping patients to understand their pain I often tell them about the pain threshold differences in violinist’s hands — lower on the left because of the meaning of the left hand in terms of playing. If a carpenter cuts his finger, this may not be a great problem. It is certainly not unexpected. If a violinist cuts his left index finger, this could be a significant problem in terms of being able to play. Same type of injury, different meaning, therefore a different outcome: more pain, more negative thinking, more worry. This would be similar for a professional vs an amateur footballer who injures a knee ligament — the financial consequences, the loss of a place in the team etc.

The way in which Bono’s body responds to the injury will be unique to him, will reflect his health and the way he views his situation. This is the same for everyone. The uniqueness of the injury, the context, the environment and the person. For treatment and rehabilitation, this is how it must be viewed to optimise the outcomes.

Hypothetical case study

When a patient comes to see me with a complex injury, I focus on the person as much as the problem (this is one of my overarching principles). This is because it is the person who tells and lives their story, and it is the whole person I am treating, training and coaching back to a state of well-being.

Assessment would include:

  1. Exploring the narrative: gathering all the information about the injury — e.g./ the circumstances, how it happened, health status, lifestyle status, past experiences, beliefs about pain and injury
  2. Pain types: e.g. nociceptive inflammatory (possible neurogenic), neuropathic
  3. Protective measures that have been adopted: e.g./ guarding, avoidance
  4. Adaptations: e.g./ altered body sense, altered movement patterns
  5. Influences upon pain: stress, thoughts/beliefs, fatigue, emotions, other health factors, rumination

Then —

Pain understanding:

  1. This is the start point. Making sure that the person understands their pain, relevant to their condition and the action needed to overcome the pain.
  2. Getting their thinking in alignment with what we really know about pain and what it means to them to overcome pain. Achieving success is about the meaningful return to living; what is this to the patient?
  3. Cultivating the belief that their pain can be overcome and that they CAN do things with the right knowledge and ‘know how’. This is the pain coach concept.
  4. Develop the growth mindset — you may not be doing things YET; NOT YET rather than ‘I will never’. Never say never. Give it your best shot. Dedicate yourself to the fullest recovery and a return to wellbeing. Sign a contract stating this is need be, and know that you will be supported and motivated at every step.

Treatment & rehabilitation:

Depending upon the pain types (biology) and the influences upon pain, specific training is designed to achieving normal body sense, normal movement and confidence in being active and engaging in life again.

If playing the guitar is what they want to do, from word go that is how the training begins; even in plaster! Sensorimotor training begins immediately, or even before an operation. Working the sensorimotor areas is vital from a top-down perspective with specific exercises and can be started whilst immobilised with a range of imagery and visualisation techniques that work the motor centres.

When the immobilisation period ends, actual movement begins to nourish the stiffened, healing muscles and joints. After immobilisation it is normal for the area to appear different — perhaps red and swollen, a different skin quality, hair and nails can change too. Movement and sense of the area is altered and needs specific attention in the early stages because a normal perception of the body is key for healthy movement.

An early focus on function for a guitarist would include thinking and training dedicated to the fine control required to play. The actual movements are part of a sensorimotor feedforward-feedback loop that must be addressed. Adopting the right mindset is key for rehabilitation and should be practiced from the outset: a coaching model for a growth mindset.

We often do not know our full potential, so until you have given it your full dedicated attention, never say never.

09Nov/14
Pain specialist clinic in London

My top 5 pain myths

In my view, it is the lack of understanding that causes so many problems with pain in terms of how pain is viewed, treated and conceived as being changeable. Pain can and does change when you understand it and think about it in accordance with the modern (neuroscience-based) viePain specialist clinic in Londonw and have a definite plan that is followed with big action towards a vision of where the you want to be. Having seen many individuals put this into practice, I am confident that the start point is always how we think because this is from where the action emerges. The right thinking begins with understanding your pain.

In the light of this, here are my top 5 pain myths:

1. Pain comes from a ‘structure’ in the body — e.g./ a disc, a joint, a muscle.

2. The amount of pain suffered is related to the amount of damage or the extent of the injury.

3. Pain is in your mind if there is no obvious cause in the body — i.e./ via scans, xrays etc.

4. There are pain signals from the body to the brain.

5. Pain is separate from how you feel or think.

There are many others.

Now, this all sounds rather negative and I like to turn this on its head and look at how we can positively influence health in order to change pain. The programmes that I create with individuals for them to follow are all about creating the right conditions in the body systems, all beginning with the right thinking that often challenges existing ideas and notions about pain.

Struggling with pain? Persisting pain? Call me 07518 445493 | Specialist clinics for pain and persisting pain in London

28Sep/14
Chronic pain and injury in football and sport

Premiership football injuries — all too common, time to re-think

Chronic pain and injury in football and sportOpening the sports pages this morning (Saturday), the news is abound with the football injuries in the Premiership. Manchester United report nine unfit players just a few weeks into the season. Nasri is ‘out for a month’ as he is due to have surgery for a ‘serious groin injury’ — if it is a serious groin injury and requires surgery, how can Nasri be back in one month whilst allowing for healing, re-training of body sense and control, fitness and an ability to perform free of any thoughts that impact upon his play? A return without fully addressing these fundamental factors will set Nasri up for a greater risk of future problems.

Just as the thinking in pain, the largest global health burden, needs to be constantly challenged, so does the way we think about injuries in football and sport.

Clubs, managers, fans and players alike want a rapid return to the field. The financial and footballing culture demands that players are back as soon as possible. The pressure is great, but pressure is created by the way one thinks and perceives a situation. Change the thinking and a different system will emerge that allows for improved preventative strategies, full recovery and gradual return. 80% recovered is not good enough, 90% recovered is not good enough; unless of course the risk of re-ignition of pain is deemed to be acceptable. We should always aim for a full and sustainable recovery.

There are simple ways of evolving thinking, beginning with players really understanding pain and injury — for example, the poor relationship between pain and the extent of tissue damage, the many influences upon how we control movement and perform, the context around an injury and how this affects the body’s response. This education and training should equally be delivered to managers, coaches and club owners. The biggest issues are the lack of understanding of pain and the communication around the injury. With understanding of pain and clear communication from the outset, there is a strong basis for optimal recovery.

Some pains come from incidents, such as a tackle (direct trauma) or a turn of pace (hamstring strain), and others from a prior injury that has not fully recovered or emerge as a result of the body gradually protecting itself more and more. This latter scenario develops from incomplete recovery from normal training and match play, i.e. there is not enough rest and recuperation time for normal tissue breakdown-rebuild. Both of these scenarios need greater consideration to keep the players playing. And sometimes, the wisest action is that they do not play.

Drawing upon the neuroscience of pain and performance, persisting injury problems in football can be addressed in such a way as to sustainably reduce the risk of re-injury and on-going niggles. We accept that sport can hurt. But when performance is compromised by factors that we can address, for the sakes of all those involved, we can think differently and take the treatment of injuries to a new level that is all about learning and moving forwards.

If you are a player struggling to return to play or a club, call us now to start your recovery: 07932 689081

29Aug/14
Conditions

There is no pain system

Pain is whole person

Pain is whole person

Many writers in health journals and magazines continue to refer to pain systems, pain pathways, pain signals, pain messages and pain receptors. There is no pain system, there are no pain pathways, there are no pain messages and there are no pain receptors.

Pain emerges from the body (or a space that has a representation in the brain in the case of phantom limb pain) and involves many body systems and the self. Where does pain come from? Well, it comes from the person describing the pain. Does it come from the back or the knee or the head? That is where you could feel it, but in order to feel it in a location we need our body systems to be in a protective mode and to be responding to a potential threat.

Pain is allocated a space where the body requires attention, and whilst this is a vital survival device when we have an injury, it is less useful when the injury has healed or there is no injury. This is the case in chronic pain, although there are reasons why the body continues to protect based on the fact that the perception of threat exists.

Pain is part of a protective response. Many other systems are also working to protect us: the immune system, the endocrine system, the autonomic nervous system, the sensorimotor system etc. — and all the systems that these impact upon, such as the gastroenterological system (how many people suffer problems with their gut at the same time as having persisting pain?).

So, in chronic pain we need different thinking because tissue or structurally based therapies do not provide a sustained answer. Instead we need to address the fact that persisting pain is as a result of the body’s on-going perception of threat. It is this that requires re-training alongside any altered movement patterns and a shift in body sense in order to successfully deal with pain and move on.

Specialist Pain Physio Clinics – transforming a life of pain to a life of possibility 

Call us to start now: 07932 689081 or email [email protected]

 

 

27Aug/14

Murray’s attack of the cramps

Most active people have suffered the agony of cramping. The uncontrollable vice-like spasm squeezes the blood out of the muscle, the acids build and the oxygen level drops. End result: writhing or hopping around until the tightness eases and pain gradually subsides. It is not uncommon for the effects to be felt for a day or so afterwards, much like post-exercise soreness. Usually there is one affected part of the body whilst Murray reports to have felt the cramping in his thighs, his trunk and forearms, a more widespread pattern.

Murray’s health team will monitor his electrolyte levels closely and implement a diet that optimises his needs. Widespread symptoms that are more suggestive of a systemic biological response is then, less likely to be explained by an issue of ions through dietary or liquid deficiency. However, we cannot totally eliminate this factor as the demands of any particular game are unique, both physically and psychologically — the two being inextricably linked as the whole person responding to a situation. As Murray says, you cannot really prepare for a game via practice. Practice is just that, practice. Hence the requirements are always different.

Nothing happens in isolation. The cramps did not just come on. They were the end result of a mass of biological activity in many body systems before emerging as a response by the whole body and person in an attempt to stop Murray playing at that moment. Inconvenient as this was at the time, Murray’s biology prevailed as it must, and he is subject to his biology as are we all. This biology is influenced enormously by cognition, that is, the way we are thinking, and the way we are thinking about our thoughts (metacognition), how we feel, and how we are thinking about how we are feeling. Understood? For there are chemical underpinnings to thought as much as movement, and movement is far more complicated that one may think. Our motor system is really a sensorimotor system. Actually, it is a ‘sensorimotorimmunoendocrinogastroautonomomusculoskeletal system’. That is no joke either. We are complex.

A thought, ‘I am thirsty’ initiates action in this system because the plan begins at that point — to get out of this chair, walk to the cupboard, pick out a glass etc etc. You may not even do this, but the plan is enacted. In some people with sensitivity, these thoughts and plans alone trigger pain. The system responds to watching others move as well. This is usually
below our conscious level but affects the way we move. In fact, movement is affected by where we are, who we are with, what we are thinking about doing, what we have done, how we are feeling and many other factors. Fortunately this data is scrutinised by the brain on our behalf before producing the required movement. When all is well, the systems work magnificently. When things go awry, it can range from inconvenience to catastrophic. And if it is at the inconvenient end of the spectrum, catastrophic thinking can have a dramatic effect upon the pain. I wrote about Messi’s experience of severe knee pain in 2012 when he collided with the goalkeeper. He thought his career was over because of the intensity of the pain. Examination revealed a bruise. He was playing again the next week. Pain is moulded by the situation, past experience and immediate thoughts.

Having seen huge numbers of people with chronic pain, complex pain and dystonia (a movement disorder that is characterised by unwanted and involuntary movements), one could think of a sportsman’s cramp as a transitory form. In rare cases, paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia (PED) is diagnosed. This is a type of dystonia that is triggered by physical exertion and characterised by a sudden onset of dystonia movements: involuntary, painful spasms, torsional movements. They come and they go.

Another problem that is familiar is the yips. Arguably best known in golf, this is when a well rehearsed and automatic movement becomes conscious and falls apart. This can only happen if you are an expert. On addressing the ball, the ensuing swing is so natural, honed via thousands of rehearsals and practices, under normal circumstances. When the yips grips, this is forgotten and literally, the player does not know what to do. This is a problem of conscious thought and focus but also an issue of movement, an example of how mind-body are so integrated and bidirectional in terms of influence.

Hopefully Murray will not suffer a further bout of widespread cramping. I am sure that the medical team are looking at the footage and talking to him to establish the possible explanations and causes. It may be a one-off but thought needs to be given to why this happened and what has happened to learn and then reduce the risks of recurrence.

25Aug/14

Greatness, smoothness & injury

In response to @simonrbriggs excellent article in the Telegraph (see here) contrasting Federer and Nadal in respect of their physical longevity on the court, I wanted to agree with Simon’s subsequent tweet about the many factors involved with an injury — the line I frequently quote being: ‘no injury happens in isolation’. Whilst I am no tennis expert, I understand that these two masters have very different approaches on the court that define their games. The wicket is more familiar territory, and I would equate this observation to the games of Tendulkar versus Gilchrist. Both masters of the willow, yet styles that illustrate very different means and modes of dominating the ball. 

Sport enthusiasts and pundits alike gush with awe at the ease with which a stroke player caresses the ball. The expert appears to have all the time in the world to position themselves in perfect balance, to be able to effortlessly time the touch, and send the ball at a speed that is vastly out of proportion to the effort applied. Federer fits this mould, and whilst he undoubtedly trains to be fit and strong, he has a technique that is so efficient and so thoughtless that he can focus entirely upon the whole game as if viewing from a point up above. And to take nothing away from the skill of Nadal, his explosive force delivers excitement as he thunderously strides across the court in Zeus-like fashion. As Simon points out, if Nadal were to maintain a physical wellness, his dominance would surely prevail. Who you would most like to be conqueror would then be down to a preferred style, and we love to talk about style.

Returning to the construct of injury that is always embedded within a context and never in isolation to a range of factors that create a situation — no injury happens in isolation. The meaning of an injury is tantamount, and certainly impacts upon the intensity of pain. Cast your memory back to Messi believing that his career was over after he collided with the goalkeeper. He had merely bruised his knee yet the pain was so intense he had to be carried from the field of play in hushed silence.  A violinist who cuts his left index finger will suffer more pain than if I slice the skin on my same digit. There is a different meaning attached to his finger, even with a paper cut. 

Whilst both Federer and Nadal will be accustomed to the pain of hard training and playing, the pain of injury is different. The way we think about the pain at the time of injury sets up the on-going responses and how we chose to behave — it is not the injury itself, but the way we think that counts. Spraining an ankle usually means limping, and this is a sensible behaviour as partial weight-bearing reduces the strain through healing tissues, and is more comfortable. When we know that all is well, in other words that the injury is healing normally (and this is meant to hurt, however unpleasant or inconvenient), there is an acceptance of the necessary steps back to normal movement and activities. The early messages after an injury then, are vital to set up a positive route forward. Excessive fear, anxiety and incorrect messages at the start can set up a pathway of obstacles to recovery. 

Drawing together the smoothness of action that interweaves with other characteristics that construe the greatness of Federer: the technical self-efficacy, rehearsed movements that require no conscious processing and a baseline of fitness and mobility, all of which create a context that minimises the risk of injury. The sublime control, gliding easily across the surface and a ‘oneness’ with the occasion offers only the smallest opportunity for breakdown that most can only dream of, including Nadal whose vigorous assault upon ball and opponents opens the door for stress and strain to emerge, persist and potentially dominate.

Whilst we can swoon over the masters of any game, the vast majority of us play amateur sport. At the level of the masses, I always feel that the risks of injury are outweighed by the benefits of participation — physical fitness, the offsetting of cardiovascular disease, the cathartic outlay against stress and of course the social element (after the game: the 19th, the clubhouse, the curry house…). Equally, whilst the professionals are honing their skills and prowess, amateurs spend a great deal of time around their occupations and families to improve on the fields and courts, imagining achievements on the great meadows of Lords and Wimbledon. I too dream and envision, but returning to diminishing the risk of injury, as the principle is the same whether pro or amateur. And there is no reason why the latter should not acquire the same knowledge and receive the same principled care.

One of the first actions I take is to ensure that the injured person’s knowledge and thinking are in alignment with what we know about pain and healing, and that their choices of behaviour always take them toward and not away from recovery, no matter the start point.  My fundamental belief in our ability to change pain drives my over-arching mission to deliver pain education to all. Understanding pain will inform positive and healthy actions across the board from professional athletes to children to stakeholders (more on this in subsequent blogs). 

Recovering from an injury is straight forward. Most of the problems arise from the wrong early messages and a desire to move on faster than the healing process, thereby disrupting mechanisms that have inherent intelligence. We literally get in the way of our own recovery. We are the problem, yet the injury is blamed. Know the injury, know the pain, know the time line and know the action to take. Simple. One of the issues that Nadal may suffer, as do many professionals, is the rapid return after injury without full recovery, or a lack of time for the body to adapt. This latter problem disrupts the balance of breakdown and rebuild that is constant in the body. Tipping towards breakdown, inflammation persists and causes persistent sensitivity, even at a low level. This manifests as the on-going niggles, gradually becoming more widespread as time progresses and often without an obvious injury. Familiar? Perfectly solvable when you know how and respect the time lines of healing and recovery. Time is money some may argue, but then stepping back and thinking about the longevity of a career provides a different perspective. Deal with this bout of aches and pains completely and create the opportunity for more years of competing as opposed to the stop-start, partial recovery that affects performance and confidence, the two being utterly related. Over-thinking movement and lacking confidence both affect quality of movement — manifesting as the yips in some cases. Is Nadal smashing his way through because he fears that one day he will finally breakdown? Only he knows. Feeder on the other hand as we have seen, has a smooth style that glides him across the courts of the world. 

In summary, to look at the differing styles of play that define Federer and Nadal, it is clear that the smooth approach taken by the former has played a role in his longevity in terms of fitness (lack of injury) and success, the two being related. Simply, the more games you are able to play without a physical hinderance or even the thought that you may have a physical hinderance, for mere thinking affects the way we move, the greater the opportunity for winning titles. So surely, the planning of any athlete’s training and career must consider the ways in which maximum participation can be balanced with time required to adapt and recover. This is the same for both the professional and the amateur athlete, beginning by understanding pain and injury. 

01Aug/14
busy-street-new-york-city

When in pain, the World looks different

busy-street-new-york-cityWe are familiar with the notion that the World is always changing. In fact, change is one of the few certainties in life that we can rely upon. However, change is only possible if there is someone present to experience how things are evolving, and that person is also changing. No two moments are the same.

To experience change we need to know what has happened previously and to recognise the difference in the now. As humans we have complex systems that work together as a whole (the ‘me’) to make sense of what is going on within us and around us, and in so doing, create a perception of the World and where we are within that World. When these pieces fit well, we feel good.

For those suffering chronic pain the World changes in a way that makes it appear threatening, distant, disjointed and sometimes intolerable. We know that places appear to be further away when we have persisting pain, and that stairs look steeper when we are tired. Both of these altered perceptions are protective as they motivate defensive behaviours that can manifest as avoidance. Whilst this is an important strategy in the early stages of an injury, as time passes, this way of operating becomes a problem in itself as engagement with life diminishes. This choice, sometimes conscious and sometimes subconscious, becomes conditioned quickly. Often the decisions about whether to approach or avoid are based upon a belief that pain equates to tissue damage. Understanding pain counters this problem.

I as an individual, with a set of beliefs about myself and the World construct the perception that I have of that World. The reality that I experience is mine, and only mine. This reality can be suggestible and is certainly influenced by many factors, including how I am thinking right now. Is a sunset the same experience when I am happy compared to when I am sad?

Pain is part of the perception of the World, my World. The pain I feel is the ‘how’ I am experiencing the present moment, and I am feeling the pain in a part of my body. This is ‘how’ I am feeling my body, and often the painful area to which I am drawn is the only part of my body that I am feeling. The pain is not separate from the World I perceive, instead it is embedded within the context of my perceived World. Pain is changeable and is a different experience when I am at home compared to when I am at work. Pain is moulded by the environment as much as the perception of my environment is moulded by my pain. We are not, and cannot be separate from the environment in which we reside.

We can use this understanding to our advantage when designing rehabilitation, training and treatment programmes. Considering the environment from where the patient has come, and certainly the environment created for face to face therapy sessions. This is both the space in which the treatment is happening and that cultivated by the therapist through language and posturing. Treatment is embedded within the place where it happens and therefore, creating a place of positive meaning can empower recovery.

25Jun/14

Where have ‘I’ gone?

Neuroscience focuses upon the brain. Neuroscience has shown us that the brain is involved with pain. Consequently the brain has been blamed for pain, the unpleasant motivator that is designed to grab our attention and enforce action that protects us from a threat, actual or potential.

Recent thinking that sensibly gathers paradigms from both neuroscience and philosophy challenges us to re-consider the brain-based explanation for pain, even if we are bringing other body systems into the frame. Mick Thacker argues that pain must come from the whole person, not a part of that person. Whilst I have always subscribed to a holistic view, considering all the dimensions of a pain experience (physical, cognitive, emotional), I have been guilty of the journeying on the brain train. As ever though, our knowledge and ways of thinking and using the knowledge evolve and now pain must be thought of as a holistic expression of the whole person.

My left buttock has been hurting for the last three days, so this has provided me with an opportunity to explore this pain and what it means for my ‘self’. It is of course me that is in pain, a localised feeling in the buttock, but nonetheless it is me, myself and I. The pain invades my attention, thoughts, decisions and plans that all involve me and my interaction with the immediate environment in this particular context. Yes this involves my brain, but my brain is me. One organ or one thought does not define me, yet I need both to sense myself.

Listening to a patient describe their pain is to listen to them describing themselves. What I hear and observe in people with persisting pain such as fibromyalgia, is a story of suffering. Suffering is a loss of the sense of self, and that is a whole, not a part. Pain is a feature but so is loneliness, avoidance, fear, anxiety and isolation. So are we just trying to change pain as this is the most frequent request made by patients? In my view, we are seeking to create the conditions for change in a direction that reduces suffering, this of course including the easing of symptoms. We can only achieve this by working with the whole person and not a part.

Although there is much talk about the pain during a session, what is often verbalised and demonstrated is a change in sense of self. We do not feel the same as before, and certainly as pain persists, this sense alters further. Yes we can identify mechanisms that underpin such change such as adaptations in the brain maps, however it is still the entire person who has the experience. Only by keeping this in mind will we be in the right track with treatment, training and mentoring patients to guide them forward. It must be their whole person that is proactively involved in this journey, cultivating a sense of self that fits with expectation and the vision of how things should be.

RS
Specialist Pain Physio Clinics, London — empathetic treatment, training & mentoring for chronic pain

21May/14

Pain and tiredness

Pain is tiring and being tired worsens pain. It is a cycle with these two bedfellows, each begetting the other. But, not only does fatigue increase our sensitivity, we also have less resilience and powers of coping. A double whammy indeed.

Sleep is often disrupted in chronic pain states. Either having difficulty getting to sleep or waking through the night, the disturbance over time leads to progressive tiredness. Put simply, we need sleep to function normally, to refresh our body systems and to cement memories and learning. Considering that changing pain is a re-programming process akin to learning, it is sleep that allows the new lines of neural communication to be grooved.

The sleep-wake cycle is affected by stress. Pain is a stressor as can be the consequences of pain. Stress is a physiological response to a perceived threat that prepares us to take action. The mechanisms are basic survival instincts that allow us to face danger and fight, or flee from the threat in flight. This is fine in the short term and useful if there is a threat, but if this system is continually ‘on’, there are a host of problems that ensue. They include increased and on-going muscle tension, raised blooded pressure, enhanced use of energy, altered blood flow, slowed digestion and cessation of reproductive function — think aches and pains, feelings of anxiety, raised body temperature, irritable bowel and infertility.

We know about feeling irritable when we are tired. Add pain to the mix and it is understandable how mood is affected. Coping with day to day living is challenging in chronic pain states and there needs to be a plan. Coping when fatigued is difficult, and therefore part of the plan must include best action on these days. Of course, a consistent programme of graded activity and desensitising techniques target the underlying biology of pain, but we also need a tool box for different hurdles that are faced. Developing resilience is an important part of that tool box.

Here are a few things to consider:

1. A sleep habit or routine that you stick to each night. Going to bed at the same time, when you are tired so that bed and sleep become associated.
2. Three good things: write down 3 good things that have happened during the day. For example: a sunny day, I met an old friend, someone smiled at me.
3. If you wake with an active mind, write down the problems on a note pad by your bed.
4. If you wake with pain, in part this can be due to a drop in blood pressure and blood flow through the nervous system. It can become sensitive under these circumstances as blood and oxygen flow diminishes. Sitting up and moving helps to raise blood pressure and the perfusion of oxygen through the nervous system.
5. Mindful breathing is a potent technique of focused attention training that allows you to become aware of your body, your thinking and emotional state. This is as opposed to being on the autopilot. How does this help? Instead of becoming embroiled in thoughts and emotions, we observe them with curiosity. In other words, we are riding the wave rather than being tossed and turned within the wave. In doing so, we promote activity in the parasympathetic nervous system that is responsible for restorative processes: sleep, digestions, healing etc. Increasing parasympathetic activity reduces sympathetic responses, those that we are familiar with in tense and stressful situations: tension, increased heart rate, vigilance, anxiety etc.

Visit the website for more information or call us now to book your appointment: 07932 689081