Tag Archives: mindfulness

21Jan/17

Engaged physiotherapy for pain

Engaged physiotherapy for pain and the modern world

Engaged physiotherapyEngaged physiotherapy is an approach embracing full awareness of oneself as a clinician, full awareness of the person you are working with, full awareness of the context and past, compassion (self and others), insight, and modern sciences (the facts ~ what we know). I have ‘borrowed’ the term from Thich Nhat Hanh who describes engaged Buddhism, which is the practical use of the philosophical principles such as mindfulness, mindful breathing and mindful walking.

Cultivating our awareness as clinicians and gaining insight into the causes of suffering affords us the opportunity to think clearly about the best action for the individual, in this case in pain. Together with an understanding an use of modern sciences, especially pain science, cognitive science and neuroscience (there is vast overlap of course), and philosophy, we can consider each person’s story and create a way onward that is grounded in understanding, compassion, belief and the right attitude to succeed.

There are simple practices that clinicians can use each day that develop and grow awareness and insight. Here are some examples:

  • The greeting
  • Being present during a consultation using the breath
  • Deep and active listening
  • Compassionate speech
  • The creation of a calm and peaceful environment
The greeting

The initial contact often sets the scene. We can think about how we present ourselves with posturing, gestures, language and the simple smile. I would suggest always going to the patient to greet them in the waiting area, and behaving very much like you are welcoming an old friend into your home.

Being present

Using the breath we remain present and aware of what is happening right now. What is passing through me (my mind)? Any bias? Preconception? Judgement? Being aware allows us to let these go so we can focus on active and deep listening. Practicing mindful breathing each day formally for 5-10 minutes helps us to develop this skill that we can use through the day, every day for professional and personal relations to benefit

Deep listening

One of the most valuable gifts we can give to another person is ourselves and our time. Being fully present to listen to the patient (or colleague or family member or friend) creates the conditions for a meaningful interaction. All involved parties benefit from meaningful interactions as we release certain healthy chemicals in these contexts. In deep listening we can hear and understand the suffering of the other, enabling the best and wisest course of action, which may simply be to continue to listen without interruption. Learning to be comfortable with silence is a valuable skill. Much can emerge from moments of silence. (Reading here)

Compassionate speech

Choosing our words carefully, considering their effects, is an important skill to develop. The words we utter have potent effects on others as they hear, process, imagine, think and react. Of course using kind, compassionate words can create the conditions for calm and insight, enabling the person to see a way forward. A focus on health and being well maintains the desired direction, hence the use of words that encourage this thinking and vision helps the person to orientate themselves towards a desired outcome.

We have the spoken word and we have the inner dialogue. Being skilful with both is important as we need to consider which thoughts we are fuelling, or which seeds we are watering by the way we think and what we say. An example would be the effects of engaging in idle gossip. In the long-term, gossip can create issues of trust and miscommunication that breeds suffering.

As a clinician, we should always be thinking about delivering the right messages based on truth, and that provide a compassionate way forward. Helping the patient develop their skills of self-compassion is frequently needed in cases of chronic pain. Understanding that self-compassion is one of the skills of well being helps individuals to practice and benefit from the nurturing of the care-giving systems in the body that play such a big part in our health and happiness.

Creating a calm environment

We are very responsive to the environment. Consider how you would feel working in an office with no windows and in the basement of a block compared to an office with a view over a park or a river.

Clinicians need to think about how the patient might think and feel coming into the clinic. We seek to create a peaceful space for people to experience feelings of calm and gain insight into how they can be, how they can transform their state of being and how they can use these practices in their day to day lives.

The simple practices are just some of the ways we can use our knowledge and skills to create the conditions for people to get better. We no longer have to think about managing or coping, instead use engaged physiotherapy and approaches to give people the belief, understanding and skills to coach themselves, fostering independence and a sense of agency, restoring choice and meaningful living.

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These practices are part of the Pain Coach Programme, which is a focus upon getting better and achieving success in overcoming pain. The programme for patients is a comprehensive way forward addressing a pain problem by focusing on getting healthy and well, and the programme for clinicians is to develop their skills and knowledge to coach patients. If you would like further information, please email us: [email protected] or call 07518 445493.

15Jan/17

Creating peace

Creating peace is vital for suffering individuals and for society

Creating peaceCreating peace should be the aim of all society but of course peace must reside in each individual for this to happen. One of the greatest proponents of peace is Thich Nhat Hanh, a Vietnemese monk who works tirelessly to bring engaged Buddhism to the world. This means simply teaching simple practices that can be used by everyone, not in a religious sense, but instead as a way of creating peace through compassion and insight. Mindfulness is the main vehicle, and to be mindful is to be fully present, to be aware, to have insight, to have clarity, to experience emotions and thoughts in this moment, to be judgmental, and to be accepting.

Mindfulness is a simple practice ~ anytime, anywhere

Mindfulness is a practice that can be used through each day in different ways to gain these healthy benefits. Some describe a practice like this as a skill of well-being, or the skill of being well. These skills form a major part of the Pain Coach Programme, which is a comprehensive approach not only to overcome pain and chronic health issues but to create the best health to live a meaningful life within our ever-changing circumstances. It is much like learning to sail a boat when the sea is sometimes calm and the sea is sometimes ferocious. The wandering mind is an unhappy mind, read the title of a well-publicised piece of research. Whilst we also know that to permit mind wandering can be useful for ideas and creativity, having control over when this starts and finishes maybe important. Certainly being able to attend to what you are doing in this moment is a valuable health skill afforded by mindfulness practice.

Those who have practiced mindfulness will know that creating peace is one of the emerging experiences. We cannot quieten our mind directly, but the mind can calm within the context of being mindful. Thoughts just come, and we cannot stop them much like King Canute could not stop the sea. Yet we learn how to become insightful and skilful as these thoughts pop in, seeing them as just thoughts and opinions that are often very different from reality and truth. Being observant and curious about our thoughts, or the story that we tell ourselves, gives us space to choose how to respond. How can you respond? You can decide to re-focus your attention on what is happening now by using your breath, you can let the thought go (they pass by anyway), you can purposely generate a positive feeling, you can engage in a meaningful interaction or you can perform an act of generosity. All of these you can do in a way that is informed with self-compassion, being kind to yourself, a key skil of well-being.

Individually we are responsible for creating peace within ourselves. It is an error to think that somehow peace or happiness comes from somewhere or someone else. Mindfulness teaches us that we can come back to ourselves at anytime in order to feel at home and secure. That sense of safety, warmth, comfort and peace we can generate ourselves with increasing effect by practicing the skills of being well and cultivating our awareness and insight. In doing this, we are regularly promoting our own health by activating the care-giving systems in our bodies. These play a vital role in day to day physiological functioning: nourishing body systems, diverting resources to healing, repair, refreshing and renewing, digesting food and building energy levels that we need to live and feel well. This is in contrast to the protect and service systems that are designed to work in short bursts. It is when the protect mode is operating consistently that we can develop a wide range of common ailments: IBS, migraine, pelvic pain, wide spread aches and pains, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, and fertility issues to name a few. Choosing to lead a hectic life full of habits that promote survival without adequate deep relaxation only results in health issues. However, we can always make the choice to make a change in a new direction.

We are changing every moment, you just need to choose your direction in line with your vision of the well-you and groove new habits

There are many issues with modern society and its impact upon the health of all, however we also have a great deal of knowledge we can use to make an impact. There are many simple practices that we can use each day to improve our world. This all begins with a shift in thinking beyond oneself towards a mindset of how we can best give and serve our world and the people in the world. We are interconnected in many ways and collectively we can be responsible for social developments that benefit all. We are seeing this increasingly with social enterprises emerging in different sectors. This work is vital for all of us.

Creating peace within ourselves with a simple practice each day is the basis for a collective peace within society. On an individual basis, the creation of peace within is the same as creating the conditions for health as the parasympathetic nervous system predominates. There is so much to be gained from practices that can be learned by all ages (children, teenagers, adults and seniors) in different environments (nurseries, schools, workplaces, homes and healthcare facilities). Low cost, easily implemented and science-based there are a number of initiatives across the world that we can build upon and develop. However, it starts with the individual.

Pain Coach Programme to overcome chronic pain by using the skills of being well to lead a meaningful life | t. 07518 445493 or contact us using the form below.

14Dec/16

In pain ~ what is said, what is heard?

In pain ~ what is said, what is heard?

Anyone who has tried to describe their pain knows how incredibly difficult it is to find words that truly represent what they feel. The same could be said for many lived experiences, the ‘what it is like to……’ that we attempt to transmit to another person. But of course the other person cannot actually know or feel what you feel. We only know what it is like to be ‘me’.

Acknowledging this issue, when we ask people to describe their pain, they are permitted to use any words from their own vocabulary and any comparison or metaphor that emerges from their thinking because this is as close as they will get. Whilst they are telling us what they feel, as well as words that attempt to describe the raw feel of pain, others will demonstrate the degree of suffering and emotional distress that are the additional factors, or second arrow in Buddhism terms. We experience a raw feel, which would be the first arrow, and then the thoughts and emotions that have their own ‘feel’ and typically are the source of the greatest suffering, which are the second arrows.

The raw feel of pain is the raw feel of pain. The add ons are all the thoughts and feelings associated with the pain that are the cause of great suffering. 

Active or deep listening allows us to really hear what the person is saying to us. This is sitting in a state of calm and non-judgement, allowing the person to express themselves in their own unique way. Silence maybe part of this ‘exchange’ that the clinician can become increasingly comfortable residing in, with the knowledge that from silence can emerge important dialogue. Only through deep listening can we hear the words of the other that emerge within a particular context that must also be recognised ~ i.e. the difference in the way someone behaves in different situations such as the clinic when they may be anxious. We must get as close as we can to hear what the individual is saying: have I truly heard what they have said?

We can enhance the flow of communication with our posture and the way we move within the dialogue. A simple movement towards the person shows engagement whilst eye contact can be used judiciously. It is worth considering that for some people eye contact can be challenging or threatening, hence awareness and being present are important.

Our way of being, when filled with compassion and empathy, creates the opportunity for the person to speak and tell their story that is full of all the information that we need as clinicians to gain insight into their suffering and the causes of their suffering.

Pain Coach Programme for chronic pain | skills of well being to live a meaningful life | t. 07518 445493
23Oct/16

Is mindfulness for everyone?

MindfulnessWalk into a bookshop and you cannot help but notice the ever-increasing number of books about mindfulness filling the shelves, which begs the question, is mindfulness for everyone?

In my opinion, mindfulness is a practice that everyone could choose to incorporate into their lives, however, not everyone will wish to make that choice. It is also the case that the route to mindful practice can be different for different people. For example, sitting or lying and being mindful or meditating can be result in greater suffering in some circumstances and hence that person needs something else at that time. An individual suffering PTSD for instance, could discover that mindful practice leads to a greater state of stress and anxiety. There are several possible reasons for this, including whether they have been instructed in the right way about what mindfulness really is and how we go about the practice. With so many people offering mindfulness at the moment, it can be difficult to know who best to listen to or follow.

Starting any new practice is a challenge and requires dedication and perseverance. In so doing, one learns and realises that each moment there is an opportunity to get better at what you are doing. As Ajahn Brahm says, ‘there’s no such thing as a bad meditation’ — we can always take something from the practice, and the fact that you have practiced has created a learning opportunity. Sometimes the practice results in a great feeling of serenity as the inner dialogue quietens, and sometimes the voice chunters away. Good? Bad? It is what you think it is!

Mindfulness is simply about being aware of your thoughts, feelings and sensations as they pass by, which they always do. The realisation of impermanence is an important one as moments continuously flow. Noticing what you are thinking and feeling without judgement means that you begin to see things for what they are and the causes of your, and other’s suffering. This insight is invaluable for our health. One is tempted to say emotional health but this would suggest some kind of separation between body and mind. There can be no separation between body and mind as we are a whole person living experiences that are unified of cognition, perception and action. The practices of mindfulness provide a way of ‘doing’ this, although really when being mindful, we are not actually doing anything other than being aware, using our attention. To add compassion to this means that you have the intention to be kind to others and yourself with all the accompanying health benefits from positive social interactions and kindness to self.

Mindfulness is a practice with several straightforward methods (below), which is why it is accessible to all. However, actual practicing is the challenge as we have so many existing habits of thought. Our minds do wander and are filled with chaotic thoughts that inform feelings, emotions, actions and perceptions, yet all of these dimensions inform each other. This complexity defines the challenge and how one day we can quieten down the inner chat and another day it seems to make no difference. Remembering that it is not the thought or series of thoughts that is the issue, instead it is recognising that this is the content of the mind, which is not me per se. I am not the contents of my mind, and being able to realise that is hugely empowering.

Two common practices are mindful breathing and mindful walking, both if which are accessible at any moment to most. Paying attention to what arises in this moment is at the essence of the practice that develops one’s ability to focus, choose what to attend to, to reappraise a thought pattern, see things for what they are, realise that anger or another emotion is present yet you can remain focused on your intention. Keeping a focus on your intention is a great skill demonstrated at a time when an argument ensues. Instead of emotional reactions with hurtful words, maintaining a course for the intention that is usually a kind action towards another, you listen deeply and understand the other party, allowing for effective communication towards a resolution. Be able to see the reasons for the other person’s actions provides great opportunity for transforming the situation. This would be a good example of using mindfulness and compassion, the two differing.

Returning to the primary question, I believe that mindful practices can be integrated practically into people’s day to day living if the person makes the choice to do so. Potentially, this is the case for anyone. However, each person needs good instruction and guidance, in essence to become their own coach to transform their inner dialogue to one of kindness and compassion toward self and others. Mindfulness creates the awareness within which this can happen through attention training (mindfulness is about attention whereas compassion is my motivation or intention ~ there’s a difference). Some will need other ways into the regular practice by using breathing and movement, some will need different explanations to be guided and supported, but the the aim is always to develop ways to reduce suffering.

RS

Mindfulness practice is a part of the Pain Coach Programme for overcoming pain | contact us by email: [email protected] or call us 07518 445493

12Sep/16

Mindful commuting

Mindful commutingMany people commute to work creating a great opportunity to create calm, focus and prepare for a top performance, simply with mindful commuting. In London, a huge number of commuters use the tube, which is rammed with people (in a rush), often smelly and particularly hot in the summer. How can one create calm and focus in those circumstances you may wonder?

As a commuter you join thousands of others, some of which push you, breathe on you, lean on you, rest their paper on you (I once saw a woman rest her newpaper on a man’s back, which she quickly moved when he turned, only to put it back when he looked away — it was quite amusing), stare at you and nudge you. Today there was a small space next to me and a man forced his way into it creating discomfort for everyone, including himself. So there are just a few incidences that could challenge one’s patience and yet what a great opportunity to develop the skills of patience and compassion towards others. In doing so, you feel better versus feeling anger, frustration or annoyance. We can choose.

Over and above developing a compassionate outlook for the day ahead by looking deeply at a situation (we can consider that the other person may be suffering for a range of reasons and hence behaving in a certain way), we can use the following practices to orientate ourselves towards positive emotions. Being aware of and acknowledging positive emotions broadens our thinking and receptiveness as well as enhances our resilience in the face of a challenge, all of which impact upon our performance at work based on how we communicate with ourselves and others.

  • each time you find yourself becoming irritated on your commute, take 3 breaths and in particular notice your out-breath
  • walk mindfully, paying attention to each step and just be curious as to what is going on around you. Notice how it makes you feel and return your attention to your walking
  • if you cannot get through the crowd because it is busy, return your attention to your breathing to create calm and then walk mindfully
  • be aware of those around you and wish them well in your thinking, noticing how this makes you feel and how the world then appears
  • as you pay attention to your breathing, think kindly about your colleagues and boss so that when you encounter them, you communicate with skill and not on a background of feeling stressed and anxious
  • if you feel stressed and anxious it is because your thinking (embodied) has drifted into the past or future, thereby flavouring the present. Take 3 breaths and see things for what they are; be aware of this moment
  • listen to a mindful app on the journey
  • practice mindful breathing when you simply pay attention to your breath that holds you in the present moment

There are many more ways of practicing but in essence just using one or two will help you create calm and focus. Try it and see!

Mindfulness is a very practical way of being that creates calm, peace and allows you to to see things for what they are as you are consistently aware of the present moment, you listen deeply and speak with skill to communicate understanding and compassion. This is transformative in all situations and achievable for all.

Mindfulness practice forms part of the Pain Coach Programme for pain and chronic pain | t. 07518 445493

28Aug/16

Simple skills

simple skillsThere are a number of simple skills that can be practiced to become a better clinician. In essence, when we are fully present and engaged, we are communicating this to the patient thereby creating a nourishing environment. This environment sets the scene for new understanding and new habits, beginning the transformation of the suffering person.

We are not separate from the environment in which we reside and hence we, the clinicians, have a role in how the environment supports the person getting better. Arranging the treatment space is important then, enabling the patient to feel welcome, heard, comfortable and free to express themselves. This expression is the story to which the clinician must listen deeply as all the information is contained within the narrative. Allowing the person to speak in their own language with occasional prompts and guidance is the basis of the onward journey towards their vision of a desired outcome.

For the clinician to practice mindfulness is a simple way of maintaining presence and engagement with the patient. This simply means that you are listening deeply and using insight to see the causes of suffering that are revealed as the person speaks freely. Add to this compassionate speech and the communication facilitates the way forward. Communication is part of the treatment as the clinician helps the patient understand their pain and suffering — what has happened so far, what is happening now, what is influencing their pain, what they can do, what the clinician will do and how they will go about it.

Practicing mindfulness is a simple skill. As a starter, the clinician can take 4-5 breaths between patients, paying attention to the rise and fall of their chest. On the out-breath you can consciously let go of unhelpful and distracting thoughts. As soon as your mind drifts into the past or future, you are no longer present and your engagement dissolves. During the session, recognising this happening and bringing your attention back to your breath is a way of re-engaging once more.

Taking a break midway through the day to move, breath and nourish is an important refresh and renew point. A period of deep relaxation for 10-20 minutes gives us energy to be present once more and focus on the patient: their words, their gestures, their messages. We must develop our abilities to gain insight into the causes of the patient’s suffering so that we can guide and treat, enabling them to get better and ease their pain and suffering. In fact, by gaining insight ourselves, we can then help the patient to develop their insight into the causes of their own suffering and create new healthy habits around their thinking, choices and actions to actively infer new experiences.

Practical point: start by taking 4-5 breaths between patients, and at the start of the day express gratitude for the opportunity to help people get better.

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Pain Coach 1:1 Mentoring Programme — develop yourself and your insights to coach people overcome their pain | t. 07518 445493

08Jun/16

Space

SpaceThere are things that we know are good for us: sleep, water and space. Of course then we need quality sleep, water and space. I’m interested in space, and not the kind that is out there, but rather the space we choose to place ourselves day to day and how this impacts upon us consciously and subconsciously. In particular I am keen to understand how we associate with certain environments and in fact how our brains predict the meaning of a given environment and the experiences that emerge.

Here are a couple of classic examples that I hear about:

1. RSI — repetitive strain injury: I am using this term for ease, although I have issue with it, but that’s for another time. I refer to pain and other symptoms that people attribute to repeated use such as typing, clicking a mouse and texting. In the vast majority of people I see with this burdensome condition, we can evoke their symptoms by just thinking about certain environments! Their desk at work for example. When we close our eyes and think about a place, we are in essence there and it feels like it. When a place or space becomes associated with a threat value because of a link that has been established, then it makes sense to feel a warning when we think about it. However, when this persists, this becomes an increasing problem due to the behavioural aspects — altered movement, restricted use and guarding, all of which perpetuate the threat value and hence the on-going pain. Thankfully, this cycle can be broken with the right understanding and training.

* This is not unique to RSI, but any pain problem is contextual and becomes associated with certain places, positions, movements, activities etc etc. A significant part of overcoming persistent pain is by creating new habits.

2. A place in nature: a pleasant image comes to mind, unified with feelings of comfort in the body to make it an overall calming and soothing experience. This is why visualisation is so effective as we can choose to shift into our resource state whenever we need: when anxious, stressed or in pain for example. This is a technique that I blend with others to create the necessary calm we need to refresh and renew, particularly if we are suffering pain or tiredness.

Placing ourselves in an environment has enormous effects upon us as we become part of that very environment. In fact, what you experience as that environment you are creating using at least your brain, your mind and your body, and importantly how they unify. Using a film analogy, you are the film maker, the script writer, the star and the audience all rolled into one. Wow! How do we explain that? Using the very same unified processes to explain themselves! So, in becoming part of threat environment, the importance of choosing the right space is vital. Each day we should absorb ourselves in a nourishing place such as a park, by a river, in a forest or at least in a space where there is plenty of exactly that, space! And if you can’t do this on a particular day, then you can use imagery and visualisation and feel the resulting great feelings.

On a moment to moment basis, where we spend a lot of time, perhaps home and office, these spaces need to be nourishing and promote the feelings we want to feel — e.g./ at work to concentrate, focus, think, write, communicate; at home to feel comfortable, warm, safe etc. This may take some thought and some re-organising but it will be worth it — see here, a professional organiser: Cory Cook. Remember that the environment you choose to put yourself in impacts upon you enormously: the way you feel, the way you think, the way you interact. Something similar could be said for the people you spend time with.

So, when you are at work, at home, choosing a new job or accommodation, think carefully about the environment in which you will be living moment to moment experiences, because they will be shaped somewhat by that very environment. Get out into a big open space and move around in it, see it, smell it, feel it, using all your senses. And if you can’t, then take a deep breath, slowly let it go, do it again, close your eyes and take yourself to a space where you will feel great.

Pain Coach Programme for persistent pain | t. 07518 445493

08Feb/16

Practical mindfulness

mindfulness by swampland | https://flic.kr/p/k3t1k

mindfulness by swampland | https://flic.kr/p/k3t1k

Practical mindfulness is for everyone. It is for everyone who wants to develop insight into their own mind, and in so doing will relieve an amount of suffering that is significantly impacting upon their life in a number of ways: pain, anxiety, ill health.

It is important to point out at this juncture that the mind does not exist purely in our heads but rather we are our mind, and our bodies are an extension of our minds as they reach out to both sample and create the world that we perceive. We think with our whole self. And if you are befuddled by this, just for a moment consider where you feel hungry or thirsty? Is it in your head? Does your mouth go off for a drink? Or do you feel thirsty and you go and get a drink to quench your thirst?

Practical mindfulness, for me, is about creating the conditions for health. We have everything we need to be healthy, yet life seems to get in the way. Consider: too busy to exercise or move? I want that cake because I am hungry and fancy a snack. I feel stressed because of what that person has said to me. I am anxious about _______ (fill in the gap).

Mindfulness is about being aware of what is happening in this moment, noticing the temporary nature of things and letting go (are you still thinking about what that person said? Who is left holding the burning coal?) in a non-judgmental way. This flies in the face of how we have been brought up in our society: judge! Blame! Dwell on the past and re-play that tape of that event you think that you remember — except you don’t well at all you just think you do! Crave! Want! No awareness runs through these common choices of thought or action. How are you choosing to think right now? Is there a better choice that would make you feel better? If you are aware of your habits of thought, then you can make a better choice to shift your perception and hence your conscious experience of what is happening right now.

Being present does not mean that you do not recall memories but rather that you do it with skill, noticing how it makes you feel and living the full richness without suffering, whilst letting go of unhelful thoughts. Being present does not mean that you do not plan, but instead means that you plan the future (that never comes because there is only this moment) in the present moment and therefore do not suffer the anxiety of an undesirable future. How often do you tell yourself that it will not work out? Or that you will fail or that you are not good enough? Is it true or are you just telling yourself that story. It is just a story, or a train of thoughts that you embody, live and enact and so it goes on. But it does not have to keep going on like this as we are all changing, all of the time. It is the direction we must choose: shall I keep on listening to that inner voice or let it go and be mindful? That is your choice.

Mindfulness does not require one to become spiritual or religious. It does not require any equipment. The principles are straight forward. It is only when someone keeps telling themselves that it is hard, is it hard. Why not choose to say to yourself that you will, or that you can rather than you can’t or you won’t?

There are two main practical practices: the moment to moment taking a breath to become aware, developing a sense of what is happening now and the sitting or lying practice for a period of time (usually 5-10 minutes initially) several times a day. In the regular practice you are putting down the heavy bags of past and future, and the suffering from living out the thoughts that keep passing through, especially those that you hold onto and resist. Resistence causes tension and other protective predictions that zap our energy and bring on aches and pains that are so common — migraine, headache, irritable bowel syndrome, back pain, neck pain — as our bodies try to keep up with the wandering mind. Taming the mind by gathering insight and cultivating curiosity makes way for calm times to plug-in, refresh and renew as you create the conditions for a healthy, performing, engaging you amidst the multitude of continuous stimuli in the world around. By the way, it is our embodied minds that are creating that reality, so there’s another reason to look after it, just like you do your body. You get fit in the gym, clean your body, groom your body, clothe your body. What do you do for your mind that gives you the sense of everything including that body?

Practical mindfulness is part of the Pain Coach programme for persisting and chronic pain, stress and anxiety. t. 07518 445493

 

23Nov/15

Art of living

Pain Coach ProgrammeWe like to be good at things. Sport, work, parenting, music are all common examples. We practice, note what goes well and what does not, making changes, and essentially practicing to get better.

But what is common to all of these and everything else in our lives? What overarches all of these? Living. Living itself. There’s an art to living a life of content—and this does not mean that there is no pain or suffering. A life well lived is one of moment to moment skill, and this includes what we tell ourselves and what we do. The moment to moment experiences. These determine overall how content we are rather than the ‘biggies’: new car, new iPad, and the so-called life events. Now, these are all significant (if they are significant to you) yet they make up fleeting moments much like anything else. They are passing through, like other moments. It really depends on how you are framing it; what do you think about it? That’s what makes it what it is, for you in this moment.

So, there is an art to living well that depends on what you are telling yourself over and over. A situation is just a situation until you rate the situation and then feel it and live it. Until that point, it is nothing. We create our reality in any given moment and this is an art form. And art forms need good quality practice just like sports, music, how we communicate etc. The great thing about this is that we have every moment to practice and get good at it. You don’t need to go anywhere or any kit to get good at the art of living. So what do you need? Nothing.

Whilst you are seeking to be somewhere else, you are missing what is happening now. And that is all that is happening. Have plans, have aspirations but see them for what they are—plans and aspirations. Work out how to get there, but see that for what it is—a plan for how to get there. Be excited, be nervous, be anxious, but see these feelings for what they are—feelings, emotions that will pass as everything else does. Impermanence.

Here’s a simple tip of how to enact this: cultivate the habit of standing or sitting talk, taking a normal breath in and paying attention to this breath. Do this every time you feel tense, anxious, happy, excited, angry, sad…… Try it and see what happens.

20Aug/15

Pain and compassion

puppy love by Porsche Brosseau https://flic.kr/p/cu9h5h

puppy love by Porsche Brosseau https://flic.kr/p/cu9h5h

Pain and compassion are being explored at a forthcoming British Pain Society Conference, so I thought that I would comment on a couple of important aspects.

Firstly, as clinicians compassion plays a role in our desire to guide and treat others in pain and most likely coloured our choice to become a health-carer in the first instance. Secondly, I find that the vast majority, if not all those I see are compassionate people to everyone (or most!) except themselves. Here are some brief thoughts.

Compassion is defined as ‘inclining one to help or be merciful’ (Oxford Dictionary). The Dalai Lama describes compassion from a Buddhist viewpoint: ‘Compassion is said to be the empathetic wish that aspires to see the object of compassion, the sentient being, free from suffering’. There must be an object of compassion that is another individual or of course the one that is often forgotten, oneself.

The feeling of compassion is often described as a warmth across the chest; the type of feeling associated with seeing a small, defenceless animal, or perhaps a newborn child. This feeling enhances our empathy, which drives actions of kindness towards that being. As a clinician there are clear benefits of cultivating a compassionate approach towards patients who suffer the consequences of pain, particularly on-going pain. Certainly compassionate listening and actions are skills to be nurtured as they envelope the therapeutic encounter with essential authenticity. Compassion also creates an environment and a context for effective and skilful communication; an openness that encourages the patient to express themselves as themselves, revealing the challenges that can be surmounted with a joint therapeutic effort. The importance of the clinician being kind to himself or herself is akin to that of the patient. Looking at ways to grow and flourish, to be a better clinician requires acknowledgement of the current standing, acceptance and a desire to improve, yet without self-criticism.

Frequently patients will illustrate their harshness towards themselves. This punishment and criticism fosters angst, frustration, anger and other negative emotions that are draining, damaging and ultimately wasteful as energies are put into everything but clear thought and action towards improvement. At any given time, one does his or her best based on their knowledge and skills — everyone makes mistakes, which the wise learn from and see the opportunity in errors, the opportunity to develop. Learning to be kind to oneself, often breaking a habit of some years (many people I see are perfectionists; but in some arenas this trait is very useful and a strength that enables high performance resulting in success; so let us learn how and when to utilise it), is a vital part of learning how to overcome pain, especially persisting pain.

Here are several videos that are useful to that end:

Learning about compassion towards oneself and others is part of the Pain Coach Programme for overcoming and transforming persisting and chronic pain. Call us to book your appointment: 07518 445493 | Clinics in London | Sessions available on Skype on request