Pain – the unseen force

“Do we see the hundred-thousandth part of what exists? Look, here is the wind, which is the strongest force in nature, which knocks men down, destroys buildings, uproots trees, whips the sea up into mountains of water, destroys cliffs, and throws great ships onto the shoals; here is the wind that kills, whistles, groans, howls–have you ever seen it, and can you see it? Yet it exists.” Guy De Maupassant – the monk talking to the author at Mont Saint-Michel.

Pain, have you ever seen it, and can you see it? The unseen power of pain that is the cause of suffering is one of our greatest enigmas. We are understanding where pain comes from with greater precision but with every painful experience being unique, the pattern of activity in the brain is rightly different on each occasion. The widespread networks of neurons that are active when we are in pain are not specific to hurting, there is no pain centre. It is fascinating that we can see similar brain activity during a pain that results from nociceptive stimulation of the body and from social isolation. Neither pain can be seen from the outside, only the facial expression and verbalisation with the hundreds of words that can describe the feeling.

Is this the reason why people are disbelieved? Because pain cannot be seen. How can anyone truly measure the pain of another? Hurting is subjective. I know and only I know how much it hurts and how it affects me. All too often a patient describes returning to work and feeling a sense that colleagues do not believe or understand their suffering. This can only increase the threat and elucidate further protective responses that feed into the cycle of thoughts–physical responses–emotions–thoughts.

Thoughts cannot be seen but they are real as they play in the mind, each one creating a body response: “I am hungry,”, the stomach rumbles; “I don’t know my lines,” the stomach tightens and tingles; “I have pain, what does it mean?” the body tightens, the pain intensifies. None of these can be seen but they exist as much as the wind that can bend a tree.

Pain is embodied. We feel pain in a location in the body, even if the body part no longer exists such is the case in phantom limb pain. The brain networks ensure that we attend to the body region deemed in need of protection, creating the unpleasant experience that is pain so that action is taken to resolve the issue. In the early stages of an injury we actively protect the area by reducing movement, guarding with increased tension, warning others away with bandages and crutches. If you are travelling in London on the tube, this may even afford you a seat in rush hour. Persisting pain is not related to the extent of tissue damage, if it ever really is–for pain is not an accurate indicator of tissue damage. Chronic pain can feel like a fresh injury and drives the same behaviours: attention towards the painful area, guarding with the musculoskeletal system by tightening up the muscles–our natural armour, and avoidance. These behaviours feed back into the body systems that tell the brain something is up and the brain responds by continuing to protect. The cycle continues until there is a good reason for it to stop because a safe state has been achieved.

The challenge of tackling chronic pain means that we must look beyond the tissues. Exploring the brain, the immune system, the endocrine system, the motor system and how they interact to create our moment to moment experiences, the interface with life and how we respond at any given time. Nothing is permanent. Pain can come and pain can go. Cultivating the conditions for pain to change is the contemporary way of thinking and each person requires a unique approach based on sound scientific principles. So, much like we can harness the wind to create power, we can harness our biology to create a meaningful life.

RS

To book an appointment or for information about our bespoke treatment and training programmes for pain and chronic pain, contact us today: 07932 689081

 

 

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