Messages about pain

Important Message by Patrick Denker | https://flic.kr/p/a9iUAG

Important Message by Patrick Denker | https://flic.kr/p/a9iUAG

When someone seeks help for their pain and injury, they will be given messages about pain that are potent. They are told a, b and c, and hence often take these messages and become them via their own thinking and actions. This is the reason why the early messages about pain need to be accurately based on what we really know about pain and that they motivate people to focus on what they must do to recover. The way in which we think about and hence perceive our pain has tremendous impact on the extent of suffering and how we actually experience the pain itself. Put simply, a lack of understanding that can create concern, worry and anxiety, will raise the threat value of the whole situation, and therefore the body (you) protects further, including an increase in the intensity of the pain itself. All these experiences of thought and action are chemically based — depending on which chemicals are working with which receptors determines how the body systems are functioning and underpinning what we live out.

So what should the messages contain?

1. Facts about pain and the injury, including the poor relationship between the two, that pain is part of a protective response that includes other protective means such as altered movement (e.g. limping) and that the way we think and feel influence both the amount of suffering we endure as well as the actual intensity of the pain itself.

2. The person has an active role in overcoming pain — based on (new perhaps) understanding of pain and person, what is happening, why it is happening and what action needs to be taken.

3. Other relevant information to develop the person’s understanding, and in so doing, gain their trust, respect to follow a programme that motivates through positive thinking and experience towards their vision of how they want to be and live their life.

Undoubtedly, as with any problem we must understand it before we can deal with it. In the case of chronic pain, explanations incorporate the biological changes, behavioural changes and cognitive-emotional changes afoot and how to address these comprehensively–whole person.

The whole person approach recognises that there are many inter-related dimensions of that person, and that we must consider the individual as a whole rather than a back or a knee or any other structure or pathology. The experience of pain and other symptoms is a conscious leap from the underpinning biology, and no-one fully understands how our bodies, our ‘selves’, make that leap from biology to the lived experience. However, listening carefully and compassionately to the individual provides many clues as to why they are in protect and survive mode, emerging as pain and other symptoms, behaviours, thought processes and ultimate actions. This becomes the start point for designing a bespoke, proactive programme, beginning with the right messages.

Whilst the first meeting may identify where the actions taken by the individual are incongruent with recovery, it is worth remembering that this person is doing their very best with the knowledge and skills that they possess at that moment. Everyone has strengths with which they attained success in a range of arenas. Elucidating these strengths creates a start point and also allows that person to know and start feeling that they have the tools to overcome pain, but need guidance on how to best use them. That is our job.

This approach is part of The Pain Coach Programme for individuals to overcome their pain problem and for clinicians seeking to learn the Pain Coach approach for chronic pain. Contact us for more details if you are suffering chronic pain or a therapist wanting to advance yourself in the field of chronic pain: 07518 445493

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