Lesser known problems associated with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

Here is a selection of reports and studies that discuss lesser known features of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS):

Unexpected association between joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder.

Rheumatol Int. 2013 Nov 23. — Pasquini M, Celletti C, Berardelli I, Roselli V, Mastroeni S, Castori M, Biondi M, Camerota F.

Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is a largely unrecognized, heritable connective tissue disorder, mainly characterized by joint instability complications, widespread musculoskeletal pain, and minor skin features. In a case-control study, 47 consecutive JHS/EDS-HT patients were investigated for the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and compared to 45 healthy controls in a single center. The psychiatric evaluation consisted of structured clinical interview for DSM-IV criteria by using the SCID-I and the SCID-II. Symptom severity was assessed using the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D), and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). The Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF) was used to assess the overall severity of psychological, social, and occupational functions. JHS/EDS-HT patients had significantly higher mean scores for all questionnaires: HAM-A (6.7 vs. 3.8), HAM-D (6.4 vs. 2.7), GAF (75.0 vs. 86.1), and BPRS (27.5 vs. 25.6). The JHS/EDS-HT group had a 4.3 higher risk of being affected by any psychiatric disorder, and in particular, a 5.8 higher risk of having a personality disorder. In particular, 5 JHS/EDS-HT suffered from obsessive-compulsive personality disorder with an observed prevalence rate of 10.6 % (3.6-23.1). Psychiatric assessment of JHS/EDS-HT patients showed an extremely high prevalence of personality disorders (21 %), and of Axis-I disorders (38 %), mostly depressive. This study did not confirm the previously reported increased rate of panic disorders in JHS/EDS-HT.

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Ocular features in joint hypermobility syndrome/ehlers-danlos syndrome hypermobility type: a clinical and in vivo confocal microscopy study.

Am J Ophthalmol. 2012 Sep;154(3):593-600.e1. — Gharbiya M, Moramarco A, Castori M, Parisi F, Celletti C, Marenco M, Mariani I, Grammatico P, Camerota F.

To investigate ocular anomalies in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT).
DESIGN: Prospective, cross-sectional study.
METHODS: Forty-four eyes of 22 consecutive patients with an established diagnosis of JHS/EDS-HT and 44 eyes of 22 age- and gender-matched control subjects. Administration of a standardized questionnaire (Ocular Surface Disease Index) and a complete ophthalmologic examination, including assessment of best-corrected visual acuity, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, intraocular pressure measurement, indirect ophthalmoscopy, tear-film break-up time, Schirmer I testing, axial length and anterior chamber depth measurement, corneal topography, corneal pachymetry, and confocal microscopy. Main outcome measures included comparing ocular anomalies in JHS/EDS-HT and control eyes.
RESULTS: JHS/EDS-HT patients reported dry eye symptoms more commonly than controls (P < .0001). Scores of tear-film break-up time and Schirmer I test were significantly lower in JHS/EDS-HT eyes (P < .0001). Minor lens opacities were significantly more common in the JHS/EDS-HT group (13.6%; P < .05). Pathologic myopia with abnormal vitreous was found in 7 JHS/EDS-HT eyes (15.9%) and 0 controls (P = .01). Corneas were significantly steeper and the best-fit sphere index was significantly higher in JHS/EDS-HT group (P < .01). By confocal microscopy, the JHS/EDS-HT group showed lower density of cells in the superficial epithelium (P < .001) and higher density of stromal keratocytes in anterior and posterior stroma (P < .0001).
CONCLUSIONS: The most consistent association of eye anomalies in the JHS/EDS-HT group included xerophthalmia, steeper corneas, pathologic myopia, and vitreous abnormalities, as well as a higher rate of minor lens opacities. These findings indicate the need for ophthalmologic survey in the assessment and management of patients with JHS/EDS-HT.

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The cornea in classic type ehlers-danlos syndrome: macro- and microstructural changes.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Dec 11;54(13):8062-8. — Villani E, Garoli E, Bassotti A, Magnani F, Tresoldi L, Nucci P, Ratiglia R.

To analyze in vivo corneal morphology and ultrastructural features in patients with classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS).
METHODS: Fifty patients with classic EDS and 50 age- and sex-matched control subjects were studied. A clinical evaluation was made with the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire and a complete ophthalmic examination, including assessment of the best-corrected visual acuity and refraction, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, tear break-up time, intraocular pressure, Schirmer test without topical anesthesia, and corneal diameter. Scheimpflug camera topography and in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) were used to investigate corneal morphology and corneal ultrastructural features respectively.
RESULTS: Classic EDS patients, compared to controls, had thinner and steeper corneas (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively; independent samples t-test). IVCM showed thinner stromas, lower keratocyte densities (P < 0.001), increased applanation-related stromal folds (P < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U test), and increased endothelial hyperreflective dots (P < 0.05) in these patients. The study group also had increased symptoms (OSDI score: P < 0.01, independent samples t-test) and signs (tear break-up time and Schirmer test: P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively) of tear film dysfunction.
CONCLUSIONS: Patients with classic EDS had macro- and microstructural changes of the cornea, which is a target tissue of the disease. These findings should be considered to optimize clinical management of these patients and to evaluate the opportunity of adding ocular findings to the classic EDS diagnostic criteria.

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Neurologic manifestations of inherited disorders of connective tissue.

Handb Clin Neurol. 2014;119:565-76. — Debette S, Germain DP.

Inherited disorders of connective tissue are single gene disorders affecting structure or function of the connective tissue. Neurological manifestations are classic and potentially severe complications of many such disorders. The most common neurological manifestations are cerebrovascular. Ischemic stroke is a classic complication of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (type IV), homocystinuria, and arterial tortuosity syndrome, and may occasionally be seen in Marfan syndrome and pseudoxanthoma elasticum with distinct underlying mechanisms for each disease. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome can also lead to cervical artery dissection (with or without ischemic stroke), carotid-cavernous fistula, intracranial dissections and aneurysms potentially causing subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage, and arterial rupture. Other neurological manifestations include nerve root compression and intracranial hypotension due to dural ectasia in Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndrome, spinal cord compression in osteogenesis imperfecta, and mucopolysaccharidosis type I and VI, carpal tunnel syndrome in mucopolysaccharidosis type I, II, and VI. Impaired mental development can be observed in homocystinuria, mucopolysaccharidosis type II, and the severe form of mucopolysaccharidosis type I. For the neurologist, being aware of these complications and of the diagnostic criteria for inherited connective tissue disorders is important since neurological complications can be the first manifestation of the disease and because caution may be warranted for the management of these patients.

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Pediatr Radiol. 2011 Dec;41(12):1495-504;

Loeys-Dietz syndrome: cardiovascular, neuroradiological and musculoskeletal imaging findings.

Kalra VB, Gilbert JW, Malhotra A.

Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is an increasingly recognized autosomal-dominant connective tissue disorder with distinctive radiological manifestations, including arterial tortuosity/aneurysms, craniofacial malformations and skeletal abnormalities. LDS exhibits a more aggressive course than similar disorders, such as Marfan or the vascular subtype of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, with morbidity and mortality typically resulting from complications of aortic/arterial dissections. Early diagnosis, short-interval follow-up imaging and prophylactic surgical intervention are essential in preventing catastrophic cardiovascular complications. This review focuses on the cardiovascular, neuroradiological and musculoskeletal imaging findings in this disorder and recommendations for follow-up imaging.

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J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2010 Aug 4;92(9):1876-83.

Musculoskeletal findings of Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

Erkula G, Sponseller PD, Paulsen LC, Oswald GL, Loeys BL, Dietz HC.

BACKGROUND: Loeys-Dietz syndrome is a recently recognized multisystemic disorder caused by mutations in the genes encoding the transforming growth factor-beta receptor. It is characterized by aggressive aneurysm formation and vascular tortuosity. We report the musculoskeletal demographic, clinical, and imaging findings of this syndrome to aid in its diagnosis and treatment.
METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the demographic, clinical, and imaging data of sixty-five patients with Loeys-Dietz syndrome seen at one institution from May 2007 through December 2008.
RESULTS: The patients had a mean age of twenty-one years, and thirty-six of the sixty-five patients were less than eighteen years old. Previous diagnoses for these patients included Marfan syndrome (sixteen patients) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (two patients). Spinal and foot abnormalities were the most clinically important skeletal findings. Eleven patients had talipes equinovarus, and nineteen patients had cervical anomalies and instability. Thirty patients had scoliosis (mean Cobb angle [and standard deviation], 30 degrees +/- 18 degrees ). Two patients had spondylolisthesis, and twenty-two of thirty-three who had computed tomography scans had dural ectasia. Thirty-five patients had pectus excavatum, and eight had pectus carinatum. Combined thumb and wrist signs were present in approximately one-fourth of the patients. Acetabular protrusion was present in approximately one-third of the patients and was usually mild. Fourteen patients had previous orthopaedic procedures, including scoliosis surgery, cervical stabilization, clubfoot correction, and hip arthroplasty. Features of Loeys-Dietz syndrome that are important clues to aid in making this diagnosis include bifid broad uvulas, hypertelorism, substantial joint laxity, and translucent skin.
CONCLUSIONS: Patients with Loeys-Dietz syndrome commonly present to the orthopaedic surgeon with cervical malformations, spinal and foot deformities, and findings in the craniofacial and cutaneous systems.

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