Graded Motor Imagery

The Graded Motor Imagery (GMI) programme is an evidence based therapeutic approach that falls under the brain training umbrella. This is because the treatment targets changes that have occurred in the brain. We know about these changes from a number of brain scanning studies in recent years. The actual programme has been developed largely through the brilliant work of Lorimer Moseley, so for this we are truly grateful.

The programme runs through three sequential stages, laterality (recognising left and right), imagined movements and mirror therapy. In essence this is graded progression, working the brain to desensitise, habituate and develop function. These areas of the brain are part of the pain matrix which means that they have a role in pain production as well as other functions that are non-nociceptive (nothing to do with danger).

We know that pain is a brain experience influenced by physical, psychological and social factors, hence the biopsychosocial model. Targeting the brain with clinical treatments is offering a very modern approach to pain and chronic pain in particular.

Mirror therapy using a mirror box or standing mirror was initially used for stroke rehabilitation and for phantom limb pain but in fact it can be used for a range of nasty pains and functional problems. The brain ‘sees’ a normally functioning hand, foot or other body part as the affected area is hidden and the unaffected side is moved. Observing the reelection of the unaffected side, the brain thinks that the affected side is working well and looking normal. As the brain uses visual information over and above information from the tissues, it will prioritise what it sees compared to what it feels.

At Specialist Pain Physio we use this programme in its entirety but also the different components. We also integrate the techniques with others to optimise the learning process and changes in the nervous system that lead to pain relief and improved ability.

Rehabilitation is learning and the underlying process is similar to learning a language or a musical instrument. It takes time, practice, motivation and perseverance. Give the brain and the nervous system the opportunity and it can change for the better.

We commonly use GMI for complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), arthritis, tendon pain and injury, sports injuries and repetitive strain injury (RSI). The principles can be applied in a range of other conditions to provide a more complete bodywide rehabilitation programme.

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