Early messages about pain

Our immediate and early thoughts about an injury or pain that we feel can have a significant impact upon how we cope and manage the problem. It is therefore vital that we have a really good understanding of what is normal and what we can do to optimise the conditions for healing.

Within this early experience, the messages that we hear from those involved including family, friends, team mates and healthcare professionals, can have a profound influence upon our beliefs about the injury that pervade our on-going, personal approach to recovery.

The way in which we behave when we are injured, in other words the actions we choose to take, will be determined by our belief system. This system evolves from a very early age as we learn what is dangerous in life, absorb messages from significant others (parents, teachers etc) and create strategies to deal with pain and injury. Cultural memes are those passed from generation to generation, keeping the story alive. However, these can be based on erroneous information and be perpetuating an ineffective way of handling pain. On this basis, we have an obligation to pass on information that is based upon what we know about pain rather than simply taking the actions of our predecessors, ‘because that was the way they did it’.

The messages and information given to an individual about their injury and pain need to be based upon fact. Imagery provoked by language such as ‘your spine is crumbling’ and ‘your joint is worn out’ can and often do create fear of movement and sensitise our thinking. Thinking is as much neuronal activity in the brain as a movement and we can easily become sensitised to our own sensitivity via this cognitive-emotional route. How quickly can we develop a fear? In a flash.

Imagery is potent. Close your eyes and think about placing a yellow, ripe, juicy lemon segment on your lips and tongue.

The medical management of an acute injury is important: i.e./ diagnosis, investigation, RICE. All of these you would expect. But, we also need to understand and know what is NORMAL and pain is NORMAL in this situation. Unpleasant yes, normal yes. Need for control with medication? By and large yes.

Let’s make sure that we send the right signals with effective language that promotes the right thinking and consequent behaviours.

 

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