Children, pain and school

UP | Understanding PainPeople are usually shocked to hear how many children suffer persisting pain, and quite naturally there is an impact upon school as much as the school environment plays a part in the pain experience. The education system needs to acknowledge this fact and institute a change of thinking that of course begins with understanding pain. Pain is a societal issue not a medical issue in isolation. Maintaining pain in the medical realm is one of the reasons that it is such a big problem. Looking at pain through but one lens means that the bigger and truer picture is missed and the natural opportunities for change are minimised when reliant upon limited options.

Children, pain and schools

Maybe 1 in 4 or 1 in 5 children suffer persistent pain. That is an awful lot of kids struggling along with their families. If there was greater understanding then the right thinking and actions could help these individuals to improve their lives by overcoming pain — not just managing or coping.

The current education systems place an enormous and continual strain upon children. Many rise early, spend all day at school and then come home to do homework. Hours and hours. Then there is the pressure, the unspoken pressure to achieve the best marks and anti thing else is failure. The greatest demands are usually placed upon oneself but this thinking emerges via the system and the culture. We should be doing the best we can and putting in effort of course but not just into schoolwork. Carrots are good for you, but would you eat them all day, every day? The internet is useful but is it healthy to be doing this every day, all day? The continued strain shifts the child into protect and survive mode so no wonder we are seeing the following list of ailments and issues: tummy pain, IBS, headaches, migraines, painful periods at the onset of this development, widespread musculoskeletal pain, anxiety, sleep disruption, low self-esteem, altered body sense and image…..just to name a few. Will we look back and ask ‘what were we thinking?’

So as we hit revision time and kids are preparing for exams, we need to make sure they are being nourished — meet the basic needs: food, drink, rest, sleep, exercise, movement, belief in themselves…you are good enough!!!! We want good marks, you may say. Of course you do. But you also want a child who believes in themselves, feels good enough and is not scared of getting things wrong. This can only be fostered within society.

Going to school is normal and healthy. School offers a context for learning how to be you — communicating, laughing, playing, problem solving, thinking clearly, changing state, how to be healthy, how to be a good citizen in a community, insight into the way I think etc etc. Wow, what a wonderful time and opportunity. So when pain is a problem (and it almost always comes hand in hand with more anxiety than is helpful — some anxiety is of course normal and a motivator to take action), missing school becomes part of the issue. The school environment can become a threat when the thought of returning to the busy corridors, the demands, sometimes unsympathetic staff, is enough to trigger pain and anxiety. However, this can be overcome with a comprehensive approach and indeed gradually building up time at school is part of the way that the child gets better. Much like an adult returning to work; this is part of getting better instead of waiting to get better to go back to work. The thinking needs to change with understanding of why it is important. It is important because we want normal; the resumption of normal ‘self’ and this self is the one who goes to school and become part of that environment.

To enact this needs understanding and communication between the child, caregivers, the school and parents. There is no reason why this cannot happen. Gradually building time whilst working on a programme that is making the child feel better and better — this includes working knowledge of pain to create a sense of safety, movement, exercises, mindfulness, relaxation, but the child becomes their own coach, knowing what they need to do at any given moment. Their confidence builds, they feel better and head towards their desired outcome.

We all know that our world is fast changing and the life that a child leads now is very different to ours when we were growing up. But there are still the same biological needs and these are being impacted upon by connectivity on social media, the devices themselves, the demands from society and their thinking that is being mounded by all of the aforementioned. In relation to the problem of pain and children and schools, we can start by helping all those to understand pain. It should be part of their education as we all feel pain at some point and our understanding of it and what it means frames how we behave and react. That would be a great start.

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