Changing pain and suffering in 3 steps

Changing pain and suffering in 3 steps –> Logically, anecdotally and empirically, understanding one’s pain is a foundation from where action can be taken to initiate change. Conversely, lacking insight into the cause of pain and being unaware of the contributing factors creates anxiety that forms its own cycle of problems. This is certainly true when pain persists with no obvious structural or pathological reason — a common scenario.

The initial feeling of pain could be termed the primary sensation. The location, quality and intensity are noted, motivating responses: have a look, move, perhaps touch and seek advice. From the primary feeling comes an automatic thought that is deeply grounded in a belief system about pain, injury, life, health and the landscape of our world. This automatic thought triggers a range of emotional and physical responses that are experienced as secondary effects. The secondary effects of limitation, suffering, further pain and sensitisation — an often downward spiral accompanied by despair,  a perceived loss of control — accounting for much of the impact upon quality of life.

There is a fulcrum point between the primary and the secondary that is so potent; a fulcrum point being the place where leverage can be applied to affect a process. In physical therapy — for this is my background — this could be the careful and reasoned application of a hands-on technique to effect change in the way the brain processes sensory information from the body; the basis for relief as the brain alters it’s outputs and hence the sense of physical self. Similarly, to intervene at the point of feeling pain so as to minimise or even prevent the secondary effects that are driven by the automatic thought is a practice that can be cultivated.

  • Pain -> thought — meaning? -> increase in pain, tension, suffering
  • Pain -> thought — mindfulness -> reduced pain, tension, suffering

3 steps to easing pain & suffering 

There are several steps to developing the practice. Firstly, understanding your own pain is vital. What are the biological mechanisms and sources? And what can influence this biology? The latter includes stress, fatigue, movement, thinking, beliefs and the environment. A further point to consider is always that of perception. We all have our own unique perception that is created by our mind~brain, again based on our view of ourselves and the world, moulded by years of experience that blends with our genetics. No matter what the situation, our own reality is the one we respond to, and in the case of pain and sensitivity, the responses can increasingly be triggered by non-threatening situations and environments that are perceived now to be threatening.

The second step is to develop awareness of one’s own thinking and perception at the point that pain is noted. It is by becoming aware that we can then make the necessary change and apply leverage. To be aware means that you must be present as opposed to the autopilot mode where the mind drifts into the past, replaying tapes of previous events — that can equally trigger emotional and physical responses — ruminating on what has been, or fantasising or constructing a future. Neither fundamentally exist, yet we respond and behave as if this is the case; it is our reality for that moment. In doing so, the present moment is missed and we follow the mind and it’s wanderings. All minds do this, this is normal, but if the wanderings create suffering, angst and discomfort, it does not bode well for a happy existence.

The third step is to practice. Being aware is being mindful; the way in which pain and suffering can be eased. Creating a habit of regular practice is certainly achievable with a little motivation, guidance and support. Within a few weeks, people often report a significant difference in how they feel in terms of pain but also in their ability to deal with pain, their resilience. Mindfulness practice changes how the body physically feels and there is a fortified sense of facing life. The release of tension, the removal of the sandbags from the shoulders is welcome in all cases.

Specialist Pain Physio Clinics in London for chronic pain and injury — mindfulness is part of a comprehensive treatment and training programme to reduce pain and suffering, and guide individuals back to a fulfilling life — call us on 07932 689081

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