Murray’s attack of the cramps

Most active people have suffered the agony of cramping. The uncontrollable vice-like spasm squeezes the blood out of the muscle, the acids build and the oxygen level drops. End result: writhing or hopping around until the tightness eases and pain gradually subsides. It is not uncommon for the effects to be felt for a day […]

Greatness, smoothness & injury

In response to @simonrbriggs excellent article in the Telegraph (see here) contrasting Federer and Nadal in respect of their physical longevity on the court, I wanted to agree with Simon’s subsequent tweet about the many factors involved with an injury — the line I frequently quote being: ‘no injury happens in isolation’. Whilst I am […]

When is a door not a door? When it’s a jar – a perspective on back pain

20140730-225623-82583871.jpg

This old joke springs to mind when I think about back pain. We can think simply about a door and create an image of how it appears but in fact a door consists of at least some of the following: a piece of wood (or another material), a handle, some hinges, a lock and a […]

Chronic pain developing at work

Stress and pain at work

Many chronic problems evolve slowly. The aches and pains become increasingly bothersome without any obvious injury as our biology gradually changes. Our bodies are surviving rather than flourishing, and this is because of both physical and mental strain. Recovery time is minimised as the protective systems remain ‘on’, disrupting our ability to think clearly, sleep, laugh, […]

It’s time to bring what we know about chronic pain into sport

I recall a time when a consultant told me that chronic pain does not exist in private medicine. I was somewhat dumbfounded that an intelligent person could have such a thought. As a far as I was (and am) concerned, pain is classless. This was some years ago, however I am reminded of this when […]

Where have ‘I’ gone?

Neuroscience focuses upon the brain. Neuroscience has shown us that the brain is involved with pain. Consequently the brain has been blamed for pain, the unpleasant motivator that is designed to grab our attention and enforce action that protects us from a threat, actual or potential. Recent thinking that sensibly gathers paradigms from both neuroscience […]

Pain and tiredness

Pain is tiring and being tired worsens pain. It is a cycle with these two bedfellows, each begetting the other. But, not only does fatigue increase our sensitivity, we also have less resilience and powers of coping. A double whammy indeed. Sleep is often disrupted in chronic pain states. Either having difficulty getting to sleep […]

Fibromyalgia — creating conditions for change

Pain and symptoms can and do change. They can change moment to moment and day to day, but if you suffer persisting symptoms, all of the variations can blend into a long physical and mental struggle. Striving for change needs understanding, motivation, resilience and a plan of how to reach your goals. Fibromyalgia is biology […]

The habitat — multisensory memories

Memories of the habitat

Running in the woods today I was taken back to school days when we would go down to the habitat to learn about nature. Our enthusiastic science teacher, whose laboratory experiments would invariably go wrong, led us down the hill, across the playing fields and into a small wooded area that surrounded a murky pond. […]

Beyond the biomedical model of pain – an interview with Richmond Stace

physiospot

Recently I was interviewed by Rachael from Physiopedia and Physiospot. We discussed some of the areas I feel are important in tackling the problem of pain, in particular chronic pain. Click here for the interview Primarily the topic focus was the psychosocial aspects of pain, an area that has provoked increasing interest. The word is […]