Category Archives: Pain Education

29Aug/14
Conditions

There is no pain system

Pain is whole person

Pain is whole person

Many writers in health journals and magazines continue to refer to pain systems, pain pathways, pain signals, pain messages and pain receptors. There is no pain system, there are no pain pathways, there are no pain messages and there are no pain receptors.

Pain emerges from the body (or a space that has a representation in the brain in the case of phantom limb pain) and involves many body systems and the self. Where does pain come from? Well, it comes from the person describing the pain. Does it come from the back or the knee or the head? That is where you could feel it, but in order to feel it in a location we need our body systems to be in a protective mode and to be responding to a potential threat.

Pain is allocated a space where the body requires attention, and whilst this is a vital survival device when we have an injury, it is less useful when the injury has healed or there is no injury. This is the case in chronic pain, although there are reasons why the body continues to protect based on the fact that the perception of threat exists.

Pain is part of a protective response. Many other systems are also working to protect us: the immune system, the endocrine system, the autonomic nervous system, the sensorimotor system etc. — and all the systems that these impact upon, such as the gastroenterological system (how many people suffer problems with their gut at the same time as having persisting pain?).

So, in chronic pain we need different thinking because tissue or structurally based therapies do not provide a sustained answer. Instead we need to address the fact that persisting pain is as a result of the body’s on-going perception of threat. It is this that requires re-training alongside any altered movement patterns and a shift in body sense in order to successfully deal with pain and move on.

Specialist Pain Physio Clinics – transforming a life of pain to a life of possibility 

Call us to start now: 07932 689081 or email [email protected]

 

 

25Aug/14

Greatness, smoothness & injury

In response to @simonrbriggs excellent article in the Telegraph (see here) contrasting Federer and Nadal in respect of their physical longevity on the court, I wanted to agree with Simon’s subsequent tweet about the many factors involved with an injury — the line I frequently quote being: ‘no injury happens in isolation’. Whilst I am no tennis expert, I understand that these two masters have very different approaches on the court that define their games. The wicket is more familiar territory, and I would equate this observation to the games of Tendulkar versus Gilchrist. Both masters of the willow, yet styles that illustrate very different means and modes of dominating the ball. 

Sport enthusiasts and pundits alike gush with awe at the ease with which a stroke player caresses the ball. The expert appears to have all the time in the world to position themselves in perfect balance, to be able to effortlessly time the touch, and send the ball at a speed that is vastly out of proportion to the effort applied. Federer fits this mould, and whilst he undoubtedly trains to be fit and strong, he has a technique that is so efficient and so thoughtless that he can focus entirely upon the whole game as if viewing from a point up above. And to take nothing away from the skill of Nadal, his explosive force delivers excitement as he thunderously strides across the court in Zeus-like fashion. As Simon points out, if Nadal were to maintain a physical wellness, his dominance would surely prevail. Who you would most like to be conqueror would then be down to a preferred style, and we love to talk about style.

Returning to the construct of injury that is always embedded within a context and never in isolation to a range of factors that create a situation — no injury happens in isolation. The meaning of an injury is tantamount, and certainly impacts upon the intensity of pain. Cast your memory back to Messi believing that his career was over after he collided with the goalkeeper. He had merely bruised his knee yet the pain was so intense he had to be carried from the field of play in hushed silence.  A violinist who cuts his left index finger will suffer more pain than if I slice the skin on my same digit. There is a different meaning attached to his finger, even with a paper cut. 

Whilst both Federer and Nadal will be accustomed to the pain of hard training and playing, the pain of injury is different. The way we think about the pain at the time of injury sets up the on-going responses and how we chose to behave — it is not the injury itself, but the way we think that counts. Spraining an ankle usually means limping, and this is a sensible behaviour as partial weight-bearing reduces the strain through healing tissues, and is more comfortable. When we know that all is well, in other words that the injury is healing normally (and this is meant to hurt, however unpleasant or inconvenient), there is an acceptance of the necessary steps back to normal movement and activities. The early messages after an injury then, are vital to set up a positive route forward. Excessive fear, anxiety and incorrect messages at the start can set up a pathway of obstacles to recovery. 

Drawing together the smoothness of action that interweaves with other characteristics that construe the greatness of Federer: the technical self-efficacy, rehearsed movements that require no conscious processing and a baseline of fitness and mobility, all of which create a context that minimises the risk of injury. The sublime control, gliding easily across the surface and a ‘oneness’ with the occasion offers only the smallest opportunity for breakdown that most can only dream of, including Nadal whose vigorous assault upon ball and opponents opens the door for stress and strain to emerge, persist and potentially dominate.

Whilst we can swoon over the masters of any game, the vast majority of us play amateur sport. At the level of the masses, I always feel that the risks of injury are outweighed by the benefits of participation — physical fitness, the offsetting of cardiovascular disease, the cathartic outlay against stress and of course the social element (after the game: the 19th, the clubhouse, the curry house…). Equally, whilst the professionals are honing their skills and prowess, amateurs spend a great deal of time around their occupations and families to improve on the fields and courts, imagining achievements on the great meadows of Lords and Wimbledon. I too dream and envision, but returning to diminishing the risk of injury, as the principle is the same whether pro or amateur. And there is no reason why the latter should not acquire the same knowledge and receive the same principled care.

One of the first actions I take is to ensure that the injured person’s knowledge and thinking are in alignment with what we know about pain and healing, and that their choices of behaviour always take them toward and not away from recovery, no matter the start point.  My fundamental belief in our ability to change pain drives my over-arching mission to deliver pain education to all. Understanding pain will inform positive and healthy actions across the board from professional athletes to children to stakeholders (more on this in subsequent blogs). 

Recovering from an injury is straight forward. Most of the problems arise from the wrong early messages and a desire to move on faster than the healing process, thereby disrupting mechanisms that have inherent intelligence. We literally get in the way of our own recovery. We are the problem, yet the injury is blamed. Know the injury, know the pain, know the time line and know the action to take. Simple. One of the issues that Nadal may suffer, as do many professionals, is the rapid return after injury without full recovery, or a lack of time for the body to adapt. This latter problem disrupts the balance of breakdown and rebuild that is constant in the body. Tipping towards breakdown, inflammation persists and causes persistent sensitivity, even at a low level. This manifests as the on-going niggles, gradually becoming more widespread as time progresses and often without an obvious injury. Familiar? Perfectly solvable when you know how and respect the time lines of healing and recovery. Time is money some may argue, but then stepping back and thinking about the longevity of a career provides a different perspective. Deal with this bout of aches and pains completely and create the opportunity for more years of competing as opposed to the stop-start, partial recovery that affects performance and confidence, the two being utterly related. Over-thinking movement and lacking confidence both affect quality of movement — manifesting as the yips in some cases. Is Nadal smashing his way through because he fears that one day he will finally breakdown? Only he knows. Feeder on the other hand as we have seen, has a smooth style that glides him across the courts of the world. 

In summary, to look at the differing styles of play that define Federer and Nadal, it is clear that the smooth approach taken by the former has played a role in his longevity in terms of fitness (lack of injury) and success, the two being related. Simply, the more games you are able to play without a physical hinderance or even the thought that you may have a physical hinderance, for mere thinking affects the way we move, the greater the opportunity for winning titles. So surely, the planning of any athlete’s training and career must consider the ways in which maximum participation can be balanced with time required to adapt and recover. This is the same for both the professional and the amateur athlete, beginning by understanding pain and injury. 

01Aug/14
busy-street-new-york-city

When in pain, the World looks different

busy-street-new-york-cityWe are familiar with the notion that the World is always changing. In fact, change is one of the few certainties in life that we can rely upon. However, change is only possible if there is someone present to experience how things are evolving, and that person is also changing. No two moments are the same.

To experience change we need to know what has happened previously and to recognise the difference in the now. As humans we have complex systems that work together as a whole (the ‘me’) to make sense of what is going on within us and around us, and in so doing, create a perception of the World and where we are within that World. When these pieces fit well, we feel good.

For those suffering chronic pain the World changes in a way that makes it appear threatening, distant, disjointed and sometimes intolerable. We know that places appear to be further away when we have persisting pain, and that stairs look steeper when we are tired. Both of these altered perceptions are protective as they motivate defensive behaviours that can manifest as avoidance. Whilst this is an important strategy in the early stages of an injury, as time passes, this way of operating becomes a problem in itself as engagement with life diminishes. This choice, sometimes conscious and sometimes subconscious, becomes conditioned quickly. Often the decisions about whether to approach or avoid are based upon a belief that pain equates to tissue damage. Understanding pain counters this problem.

I as an individual, with a set of beliefs about myself and the World construct the perception that I have of that World. The reality that I experience is mine, and only mine. This reality can be suggestible and is certainly influenced by many factors, including how I am thinking right now. Is a sunset the same experience when I am happy compared to when I am sad?

Pain is part of the perception of the World, my World. The pain I feel is the ‘how’ I am experiencing the present moment, and I am feeling the pain in a part of my body. This is ‘how’ I am feeling my body, and often the painful area to which I am drawn is the only part of my body that I am feeling. The pain is not separate from the World I perceive, instead it is embedded within the context of my perceived World. Pain is changeable and is a different experience when I am at home compared to when I am at work. Pain is moulded by the environment as much as the perception of my environment is moulded by my pain. We are not, and cannot be separate from the environment in which we reside.

We can use this understanding to our advantage when designing rehabilitation, training and treatment programmes. Considering the environment from where the patient has come, and certainly the environment created for face to face therapy sessions. This is both the space in which the treatment is happening and that cultivated by the therapist through language and posturing. Treatment is embedded within the place where it happens and therefore, creating a place of positive meaning can empower recovery.

30Jul/14
20140730-225623-82583871.jpg

When is a door not a door? When it’s a jar – a perspective on back pain

This old joke springs to mind when I think about back pain. We can think simply about a doorBack pain and create an image of how it appears but in fact a door consists of at least some of the following: a piece of wood (or another material), a handle, some hinges, a lock and a frame. All of the physical components need to be made from raw materials and require the skills of an individual or a machine to make door. These skills must be learned or a machine need be designed for the specifics of making a part. In this sense, a door is not a door until all these come together. In fact, this can only make a door when the person looking at the door or using the door knows that it is a door and has the function of a door. Otherwise it is just a collection of abstract items. We can say the same for many things that we take for granted when we know what they are and their purpose.

Back pain is such a common problem that it seems as though we should experience this pain at some point in our lives. Certainly the way we live nowadays has a huge impact on the likelihood of suffering back pain. There are many simple habits that we can form to deal with the problem but all too often, we just don’t. Why? Because it is not at the top of our priority list. That said, when is back pain not back pain? When it’s understood. So this must be the start point. Understanding pain and back pain can make an enormous difference to the suffering that spans from mild discomfort to disabling agony.

Back pain is pain in the back — this may sound obvious and it is, yet there is much more to it, somewhat analogous to the door. What is the back? It is made of many components that together form the back. To know it is the back, we must have a construct of the back. We must know what is the back and what is ‘my’ back; the ‘mine-ness’. Similarly with pain, we must have a construct of pain that is learned. These are both the ‘what’, yet we need a ‘how’ to experience them. In the case of back pain, the way in which we are experiencing the back is with pain. Pain is how we feel the back at that moment.

Just as the back is constructed by physical ‘parts’ with a conscious aspect that is non-physical (the two create the whole), the ‘parts’ involve all the systems of the body as much as the self. Back pain is the end result of an enormous amount of multi-system activity, emerging in a body location that is felt. This is the ‘is-ness’ of the experience produced by the whole person that is the sum of every cell in the body. Pain as an emergent property of the whole person is a biological response to a perceived threat. This includes when the body is injured, pathologised and in anticipation that something could be dangerous. Consider a moment when you anticipate that it will hurt. What do you think? What do you do?

Practically, what does this all mean? It means that we cannot use a structural or component basis for treating back pain. The relationship between the body tissue state and the pain state is poor, perhaps even non-existent. Pain is emergent from a whole person who is embedded within a social setting, a culture and a context that all create a meaning for that individual who has a mind that needs a brain, yet the mind is unlikely to reside simply in that brain. The mind resides in that whole person much as the pain that emerges. Hence we must think about the whole if we are to be successful in treating pain.

If you are suffering with chronic pain, come and see us and discover what you can do to understand and change your pain

t. 07932 689081

Specialist Pain Physio Clinics, London

25Jun/14

Where have ‘I’ gone?

Neuroscience focuses upon the brain. Neuroscience has shown us that the brain is involved with pain. Consequently the brain has been blamed for pain, the unpleasant motivator that is designed to grab our attention and enforce action that protects us from a threat, actual or potential.

Recent thinking that sensibly gathers paradigms from both neuroscience and philosophy challenges us to re-consider the brain-based explanation for pain, even if we are bringing other body systems into the frame. Mick Thacker argues that pain must come from the whole person, not a part of that person. Whilst I have always subscribed to a holistic view, considering all the dimensions of a pain experience (physical, cognitive, emotional), I have been guilty of the journeying on the brain train. As ever though, our knowledge and ways of thinking and using the knowledge evolve and now pain must be thought of as a holistic expression of the whole person.

My left buttock has been hurting for the last three days, so this has provided me with an opportunity to explore this pain and what it means for my ‘self’. It is of course me that is in pain, a localised feeling in the buttock, but nonetheless it is me, myself and I. The pain invades my attention, thoughts, decisions and plans that all involve me and my interaction with the immediate environment in this particular context. Yes this involves my brain, but my brain is me. One organ or one thought does not define me, yet I need both to sense myself.

Listening to a patient describe their pain is to listen to them describing themselves. What I hear and observe in people with persisting pain such as fibromyalgia, is a story of suffering. Suffering is a loss of the sense of self, and that is a whole, not a part. Pain is a feature but so is loneliness, avoidance, fear, anxiety and isolation. So are we just trying to change pain as this is the most frequent request made by patients? In my view, we are seeking to create the conditions for change in a direction that reduces suffering, this of course including the easing of symptoms. We can only achieve this by working with the whole person and not a part.

Although there is much talk about the pain during a session, what is often verbalised and demonstrated is a change in sense of self. We do not feel the same as before, and certainly as pain persists, this sense alters further. Yes we can identify mechanisms that underpin such change such as adaptations in the brain maps, however it is still the entire person who has the experience. Only by keeping this in mind will we be in the right track with treatment, training and mentoring patients to guide them forward. It must be their whole person that is proactively involved in this journey, cultivating a sense of self that fits with expectation and the vision of how things should be.

RS
Specialist Pain Physio Clinics, London — empathetic treatment, training & mentoring for chronic pain

08May/14

Fibromyalgia — creating conditions for change

Pain and symptoms can and do change. They can change moment to moment and day to day, but if you suffer persisting symptoms, all of the variations can blend into a long physical and mental struggle. Striving for change needs understanding, motivation, resilience and a plan of how to reach your goals.

Fibromyalgia is biology in action. An integrated response of the nervous system, immune system, autonomic system and endocrine system, all of the manifestations of fibromyalgia are the outputs, the end result of how those systems operate together. Unpleasant and troubling as the pain and symptoms are, this is the body trying to recover and making the individual aware. Most of the processes happen beneath our conscious level, but those that don’t cause suffering, whereby suffering is a loss of a sense of self.

Together the sensations that we feel, the thoughts that we have and the environment around us are the experience. Edelman calls this the econiche, the interaction and end result of this interaction being the individual’s reality. The reality has to be unique: what I see and what you see in the same scene can be different based upon what we know, what we expect, current mood and attention to name a few variables. The same could be said for pain that will be influenced by similar variables. There is a biology of pain and the biology of the influences upon the pain.

My farming analogy that is based upon my belief that pain can change (neuroplasticity — the ability of the nervous system to adapt and learn; it is always changing….there it goes again, it’s just changed. And again), is a useful way of explaining to patients how we think about these systems and interactions, how we have to create the right conditions for change. Much as a farmer will prepare his field and cultivate the best soil for his crops to grow, the individual must take conscious action for the body systems to work towards wellbeing. This is the ‘why?’, with the ‘how?’ being a comprehensive approach that targets the physical, cognitive and emotional dimensions of pain.

Come and see us to find out how you can create the right conditions for changing your pain and symptoms: call 07932 689081

25Apr/14

When do we seek help for our pain?

When do we seek help?

I am interested in the point at which an individual decides that they need help. The timeline varies enormously from the initial feeling of pain to years of discomfort that finally become intolerable or limiting. Each person will have their own view that is grooved by prior experiences, culture, beliefs about health and pain, access to healthcare, the impact that the problem is having upon lifestyle and tolerance of the pain at any given moment. These factors blend to create the individual’s experience of pain that contains their own personal meaning, or lack of, the sensory and emotional dimensions.

The initial meeting presents the opportunity to explore the story of the problem. It is not just about the pain but how it affects the person, those around him or her and the interactions with their environments. The brain, the body and the environment are co-dependent and influence each other, described by Nobel Prize winner Gerald Edelman as the econiche. Each must be explored within the context of the narrative to gain an insight into the reasons for seeking help.

Over the desk I hear people tell me that they have had enough, previous treatment hasn’t worked, surgery has failed, their spouse is sick of the moaning, they cannot play with the kids, work or play sports. They have reached their coping threshold and now want change.

In most cases, the story extends into the past, sometime before the patient arrives. The problem may have been ignored or attempts have been made to ease the symptoms. The majority whom I see will have had numerous attempts to get better via medical or surgical routes but with limited or no success. This leads to frustration, anger, lowered expectations, all of which can be understood. We must also acknowledge that the body and the brain have really tried to deal with the problem but require increasing conscious involvement to move forward. The lack of progress usually means that the biology of pain has not been fully targeted, along with the vast array of individual influences upon the pain. The need for a comprehensive approach is tantamount to success in changing pain and one’s ability to engage with life once more.

The first meeting is a point in time. This is not in isolation to the complete story, similarly for the physical assessment that is a snapshot of what is going on at that particular moment. With pain and body physiology changing from moment to moment as the systems respond to the internal and external environments. The interactions of brain-body-environment are fundamental to the expression of how we feel and experience the world around us. The brain is constructing all that we experience, hence the significance of this organ when addressing pain.

So when do we seek help? This is individual and based upon our beliefs about ourselves, the world and our health. These are not separate entities but rather consistently interacting modules. Thinking in these terms helps us to devise a route forward and a way of creating the right conditions for the body systems to change in the way they are functioning. We are designed to evolve, change, grow and develop. Comprehensively addressing pain and the influences upon pain provides a tangible, measurable and effective way forward, whenever the patient decides it is the right time to engage.

For further information about our comprehensive treatment and training programmes for chronic pain, please call us now on 07932 689081 and discover how you can change and move on.

22Apr/14
20140422-060204.jpg

An ode to the receptionist

I once had a conversation with a member of staff who told me that she was ‘just a receptionist’. Anyone who has considered the patient journey will realise that this statement is untrue. There is no ‘just’. There are important people involved with the patient’s experience from the start, and usually the receptionist is the first person encountered.

The initial patient interaction moulds the journey. The first few words, the tone of voice and the attitude of the person making the booking will flavour the way the patient experiences the service. This is the same in the National Health Service as a private clinic. In this sense, there is no one more important at that moment than the receptionist. They can affect the relationship between patient and caregiver before the parties have even met.

Consider two types of conversation: pleasant, welcoming and efficient versus abrupt, cold and monosyllabic. It is clear which will be more therapeutic. In my view, the therapy begins with the first few words uttered on the phone or over the counter.

Treatment and interventions used in the clinic room are not in isolation to the administration of the patient journey. Priming is a feature of any experience, in other words, both conscious and subconscious stimuli will affect the way our body systems are working via our feelings and emotions. A word or any other sensory input that influences our thinking will drive our physiological responses. Dependent upon these responses and the mode of the body systems, in particular the nervous, immune, endocrine and autonomic, will impact upon the therapy applied.

When a patient enters the clinic room, we must and should wish to ensure that the person feels as comfortable as possible, thinking about our greeting, manners, posturing as much as the temperature and lighting within the treatment area. This may require a few moments if a patient is anxious or irritated, the latter perhaps by a wait or difficulty finding a car parking space. In fact, we often don’t know what thoughts and feelings the patient is bringing with them and we should work hard to shed any judgements that we hold. The mindful approach to therapy is one way of achieving a non-judgemental environment.

At every opportunity we should be thinking about how we can gain the most leverage to create the conditions for change and recovery for the patient. There are a vast number of variables, however if we can conceptualise the patient journey from start to finish and consider all those involved and the significance of their input, we will be going about our business in the best and wisest way. This is especially the case in the therapeutic setting but actually the same for any service provider.

Since that conversation and studying the patient journey it has always been my belief that there is no ‘just a receptionist’ or anyone else who works in the clinic or hospital, but rather a group of people all adding their input in different ways to create an environment that nourishes, encourages and points the patient in the direction of change for wellbeing.

For further information about seminars and training for staff on the patient or client journey, please contact us on 07932 689081

04Mar/14
Protect the body with armour - the muscular system

Pain – the unseen force

Le Horla“Do we see the hundred-thousandth part of what exists? Look, here is the wind, which is the strongest force in nature, which knocks men down, destroys buildings, uproots trees, whips the sea up into mountains of water, destroys cliffs, and throws great ships onto the shoals; here is the wind that kills, whistles, groans, howls–have you ever seen it, and can you see it? Yet it exists.” Guy De Maupassant – the monk talking to the author at Mont Saint-Michel.

Pain, have you ever seen it, and can you see it? The unseen power of pain that is the cause of suffering is one of our greatest enigmas. We are understanding where pain comes from with greater precision but with every painful experience being unique, the pattern of activity in the brain is rightly different on each occasion. The widespread networks of neurons that are active when we are in pain are not specific to hurting, there is no pain centre. It is fascinating that we can see similar brain activity during a pain that results from nociceptive stimulation of the body and from social isolation. Neither pain can be seen from the outside, only the facial expression and verbalisation with the hundreds of words that can describe the feeling.

Is this the reason why people are disbelieved? Because pain cannot be seen. How can anyone truly measure the pain of another? Hurting is subjective. I know and only I know how much it hurts and how it affects me. All too often a patient describes returning to work and feeling a sense that colleagues do not believe or understand their suffering. This can only increase the threat and elucidate further protective responses that feed into the cycle of thoughts–physical responses–emotions–thoughts.

Thoughts cannot be seen but they are real as they play in the mind, each one creating a body response: “I am hungry,”, the stomach rumbles; “I don’t know my lines,” the stomach tightens and tingles; “I have pain, what does it mean?” the body tightens, the pain intensifies. None of these can be seen but they exist as much as the wind that can bend a tree.

Protect the body with armour - the muscular system

Protect the body with armour – the muscular system

Pain is embodied. We feel pain in a location in the body, even if the body part no longer exists such is the case in phantom limb pain. The brain networks ensure that we attend to the body region deemed in need of protection, creating the unpleasant experience that is pain so that action is taken to resolve the issue. In the early stages of an injury we actively protect the area by reducing movement, guarding with increased tension, warning others away with bandages and crutches. If you are travelling in London on the tube, this may even afford you a seat in rush hour. Persisting pain is not related to the extent of tissue damage, if it ever really is–for pain is not an accurate indicator of tissue damage. Chronic pain can feel like a fresh injury and drives the same behaviours: attention towards the painful area, guarding with the musculoskeletal system by tightening up the muscles–our natural armour, and avoidance. These behaviours feed back into the body systems that tell the brain something is up and the brain responds by continuing to protect. The cycle continues until there is a good reason for it to stop because a safe state has been achieved.

The challenge of tackling chronic pain means that we must look beyond the tissues. Exploring the brain, the immune system, the endocrine system, the motor system and how they interact to create our moment to moment experiences, the interface with life and how we respond at any given time. Nothing is permanent. Pain can come and pain can go. Cultivating the conditions for pain to change is the contemporary way of thinking and each person requires a unique approach based on sound scientific principles. So, much like we can harness the wind to create power, we can harness our biology to create a meaningful life.

RS

To book an appointment or for information about our bespoke treatment and training programmes for pain and chronic pain, contact us today: 07932 689081

 

 

08Jan/14
Turn 'no' into 'yes'

Too many cases of “I can’t” — the effects of persisting pain

Turn 'no' into 'yes'

Turn ‘no’ into ‘yes’

Frequently patients tell me at the first meeting that they cannot do x, y and z. Naturally, when something hurts we avoid that activity or action because pain is unpleasant. It hurts physically and mentally. In the acute stages of an injury or condition, it is wise to be protective as this is a key time for the tissues to heal, and although some movement is important for this process, too much can be disruptive. As time goes on, gradually re-engaging with normal and desirable activities restores day to day living. However, in some cases, in the early stages of pain and injury, the protection in terms of the thinking about the pain and subsequent behaviours becomes such that they persist beyond a useful time. The longer that this continues, the harder it becomes to break the habits.

Don’t feed the brain with “I can’t”, feed it with “I can” — cultivate the natural goal seeking and creative mechanisms of the brain

The vast majority of patients who come to the clinic have had their pain for months or years. I would like to have seen them earlier so as to break the habits of thought and action that are preventing forward movement. As a result of the longevity and severity of the pain, the impact factors, distress and suffering, a blend of experiences, expectations and thinking about the problem, it is common to slip gradually into a range of avoidances that are strongly linked with thoughts that “I can’t do …. or …..”. These thoughts may have been fuelled by messages from care providers.

As a general statement, most activities that someone avoids because they fear that it will be damaging or painful can be approached with specific strategies that address both the thinking about the activity and the actual task itself. Recalling that pain is a protective device, an emergent experience within the body in an area that is perceived to be under threat and requiring defence, by diminishing the threat we can change the pain. And there are many ways of doing this on an individual basis — as pain is an individual experience with unique features for that person.

One of the main aims of our contemporary approach is to ensure that the individual understands their pain and problem so that the fear and threat value dissolves away. This leaves a more confident person willing to engage in training that promotes normal activities and re-engagement with desired pass-times.

To learn how you can do this, call us now 07932 689081