Category Archives: Pain Education

11Apr/16

Hands-on treatment for pain

Hands-on treatment for pain should form part of the therapy programme for painful conditions including chronic or persisting pain. A line of thought exists that the hands-off approach for chronic pain is best yet there are some clear ways that clinicians can use their hands with great effect. It is also expected when a person goes to see a physiotherapist that they will receive manual treatments as a way to feel better, and indeed people often do feel better when such therapies are used wisely.

There is no certainty as to why hands-on treatment works but it is safe to assume that touch has an effect that is likely to be underpinned by a change in the interpretation of sensory input from the body. Modern concepts of brain function suggest that what we experience is the brain’s best guess about what the sensory information in that moment means, based on prior experience. This based upon probability that the sensory information infers something, i.e. something pleasant and hence the touch feels good, comforting, soothing etc., or something unpleasant and therefore the touch can feel painful or uncomfortable.

Touch is deemed important for healthy development and is certainly an act that is used commonly to communicate. In the same way then, touch can be used to communicate in the therapeutic setting as well as create an opportunity to change pain and sensitivity. We are changing constantly with each moment being fresh and new — in fact, this is one of only a few definites in life, is that we change. We are designed to change and hence the feeling we are feeling now is only temporary. The sense of ourselves, ‘me’, is something that we feel is constant yet it changes as time passes and we gather new experiences, learning and developing.

It is worth pointing out that the mention of brain does not mean that we are only a brain. I am a whole person made of my body, brain, mind and environment, none of which is any more important as it is the sum that makes me and who I feel I am at any given moment. The false division of mind and body certainly does not hold up. My mind is not in my head or my brain, I ma my mind, which is why when I think I use my body and my brain together as ‘me’ within a particular context (environment) in a particular moment (that has just passed). This may seem like play with words, yet it is fundamental to successfully addressing pain because this understanding gives both hope and a practical way forward as we use this knowledge to create a programme of treatment, training and movement to overcome pain so that it does not dominate but instead has its place as a survival mechanism. Briefly, pain is a motivator to take action on the basis that I am predicting the need for protection against a perceived threat. More threat, more protection, more pain — not more pain = more damage as was traditionally thought. Hence, the reduction of threat is our aim.

Now back to touch: how we can use it and how it plays a role in reducing pain. Preparing the recipient of the hands-on treatment is important, priming them with an explanation and positive expectations. This can be done by simply describing why it is useful, saying that it is usually a pleasant experience to ease symptoms whilst dropping in calming, soothing words into the conversation. Addressing concerns, especially if they have had a painful treatment beforehand, is also part of the preamble, in essence ploughing the field before sewing the seeds. Then the contact begins.

The clinician can do a few things to prepare him or herself so that the first contact is felt to be compassionate and soothing from the outset. This is of course the aim — to be soothing and to create calm, changing the way that the recipient’s brain is predicting what the sensory information means, i.e. it means safety. And safety in turn means less, or no need for protection, and no protection = no pain.

  • Prepare clean, warm hands
  • Take a breath or two and let muscles relax on the out-breath (we are not always aware of how much tension we are holding, especially if we have been using manual therapy often through the day)
  • Let go of any distracting thoughts and be entirely focused on the touch and responses of the person; again, the out-breath is good for focusing on the present moment

On starting the hands-on part of the session, having prepared the recipient and being present oneself, the first touch allows the therapist to note how guarded and protective the person is in respect of the body. The image of pushing a cork in a barrel of water is a useful visualisation of how to ease into, and respond to the person. It is worth considering that it is the person experiencing the touch and not the body part itself. It is the person who is conscious and gives meaning to the touch, and hence it is the person to keep in mind as you lay hands on. The treatment then becomes a dance or an art form as the hands and the body form an alliance that aims to transform sensory signals into the experience of relief; soothing, calming and peaceful. This would be the same whether the technique more soft tissue (the many forms of massage) or mobilising a joint.

  • Prepare the person
  • Prepare yourself
  • Apply the treatment
  • Conclude the treatment, making it obvious with the hands before uttering a few soothing words (consider tone, volume etc) that allows the person to realise the completion
  • Give a few moments for orientation and shift of state before inviting them to sit up or change position

Of course, hands-on forms only part of the programme with the other facets addressing the different dimensions of pain in an integrated manner: addressing the whole person. However, a key point made here is that in order to be as effective as we can, recognising our role as individual clinicians with our own characteristics and style, we must pay attention to the person, ourselves and the context in equal measure.

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  • Pain Coach Programme — complete care for persistent pain
  • 1:1 Pain Coach — mentoring for clinicians
  • t. 07518 445493

 

03Apr/16

Knowing about your condition

Knowing about your condition can be a double edged sword, as illustrated by Ian Jack in @guardian yesterday — read here. Jack describes his experience of anosmia, the loss of the sense of smell. However, he goes on to describe how reading an article about anosmia made him consider ‘that I was in fact a member of a disabled and neglected group’, which he was ‘happier not to think about’.

The piece raises a number of important issues. Firstly that losing one of our five senses has an impact on our ability to predict the world and hence our lived experience, secondly that this impact can be underestimated by the individual in some cases and by society looking in, and thirdly that knowledge about a problem does not always help per se. Everyday people are learning that they have a condition, generally more accurately from a diagnostician and more precariously via the Internet. The latter is of course quite able to ‘diagnose’ in response to a list of words (symptoms) but the danger is that the list of possibilities still require adjudication, and it is the same person choosing an answer. It is a little like your doctor giving you a list of conditions to choose from when you tell him your symptoms, and you then choose the most sinister. Oh yes, and the computer, device, phone etc. does not examine you or try to understand you as an individual.

I write and speak regularly on the fact that people need to understand their pain in order to know that they can overcome their pain, with an emphasis on both the quality of the explanation (teaching – learning scenario) and the context in which the information is delivered. Reading an article as did Ian Jack, or finding some information online, or someone else sharing their experiences must all be put into context. These are other people’s stories and not yours is the first point, so extrapolating to your unique story has its dangers unless you have someone to clarify and provide perspective — that’s my job. Spending time giving meaning to the person’s story is important, identifying the key points and explaining what can happen in order to arrive at the present moment. Nothing happens in isolation because we have had a prior experience to flavour this one. Looking back, however, can be done in an objective way, recognising the limits of the reliability of our memory, yet it is the question ‘what do I think and do now?’ that is important.

A common scenario in modern healthcare is the interpretation of the scan result for musculoskeletal pain. Back pain for example, frequently leads to an MRI scan to look for a structure to explain the pain. Yet pain cannot be seen. You can see the state of the discs and joints according to a picture taken in a moment (a snapshot), but what does this tell you about the person’s lived experience of pain? One is objective (a picture) and one is subjective (pain). But how often is the disc or joint used to explain pain as the healthcare professional shows the person (patient) the picture, pointing to the culprit on a screen? Now that the person has ‘seen’ the picture, it becomes part of the story with the solution becoming the need to do something to that disc or joint. They have new information that is now influencing their outcome, yet they will not be thinking this as it is all part of the subconscious processing that shapes our thinking and experiences. However, when a scan result is used within the context of modern pain science, we can use the information to sculpt a positive outlook but this relies upon time with the person to fully explain and answer questions as opposed to finding an article online or in the media when thoughts arise with no-one to qualify or ask. Thoughts interpreted as threatening have protective consequences from pain to feelings of stress and anxiety.

In summary, we need to be judicious about the information we expose ourselves to and use rational thinking to determine the relevance to ourselves. We are all utterly unique with our own stories and lived experiences, so when you pick up an article, bear this in mind. You would also be wise to write down any concerns or questions and ask a trusted adviser to put perspective on those thoughts so that they form part of how you overcome your problem.

Pain Coach Programme for overcoming pain | t. 07518 445493

07Dec/15
Important Message by Patrick Denker | https://flic.kr/p/a9iUAG

Central sensitisation and higher centres

Important Message by Patrick Denker | https://flic.kr/p/a9iUAG

Important Message by Patrick Denker | https://flic.kr/p/a9iUAG

There is a difference between central sensitisation and higher centres. In recent months I have seen people confuse the two, so I thought it best to differentiate in brief.

Central sensitisation is actually a laboratory based phenomenon that describes changes in the nervous system that result in modulation of the signals from the periphery. In addition, the inhibitory processes are dulled with consequential increases in sensitivity. This can mean that things that hurt will hurt more, and things that would not normally hurt now do. This can be transient but in some people with these mechanisms at play, they experience on-going pain as there is a predicted on-going perception of threat.

The role of the higher centres in pain include interpresting the meaning of the signals from the body (all body tissues and systems) and the brain makes a best guess. This best guess is our perception of reality at any given moment. What translates biological activity within hierarhical systems (networks, processes etc) into what we perceive, we do not understand–this is consciousness. We need the higher centres to convert biology to a lived experience, and the two are different, much like a scan does not tell us about pain. The scan is obective, pain is subjective. It is the person who brign spain to life and flavours it with their experience that is made of bodily sensations, thoughts and feelings culminating in what is.

So, whilst there may not be central sensitisation at play in all cases of chronic tendon pain, if you are feeling pain in that location, the higher centres are doing a protective job that is your lived experience; it hurts in the area where the tendon occupies — we have established that pain occupies a space and not a tisse; e.g. phantom limb pain. And because any pain experience requires higher centre activity, we must address this as much as the health of the body, the tissues, the person.

Pain Coach Programme for persisting and chronic pain. t. 07518 445493

Science | Compassion | Sense

23Nov/15
Pain Coach Programme

Art of living

Pain Coach ProgrammeWe like to be good at things. Sport, work, parenting, music are all common examples. We practice, note what goes well and what does not, making changes, and essentially practicing to get better.

But what is common to all of these and everything else in our lives? What overarches all of these? Living. Living itself. There’s an art to living a life of content—and this does not mean that there is no pain or suffering. A life well lived is one of moment to moment skill, and this includes what we tell ourselves and what we do. The moment to moment experiences. These determine overall how content we are rather than the ‘biggies': new car, new iPad, and the so-called life events. Now, these are all significant (if they are significant to you) yet they make up fleeting moments much like anything else. They are passing through, like other moments. It really depends on how you are framing it; what do you think about it? That’s what makes it what it is, for you in this moment.

So, there is an art to living well that depends on what you are telling yourself over and over. A situation is just a situation until you rate the situation and then feel it and live it. Until that point, it is nothing. We create our reality in any given moment and this is an art form. And art forms need good quality practice just like sports, music, how we communicate etc. The great thing about this is that we have every moment to practice and get good at it. You don’t need to go anywhere or any kit to get good at the art of living. So what do you need? Nothing.

Whilst you are seeking to be somewhere else, you are missing what is happening now. And that is all that is happening. Have plans, have aspirations but see them for what they are—plans and aspirations. Work out how to get there, but see that for what it is—a plan for how to get there. Be excited, be nervous, be anxious, but see these feelings for what they are—feelings, emotions that will pass as everything else does. Impermanence.

Here’s a simple tip of how to enact this: cultivate the habit of standing or sitting talk, taking a normal breath in and paying attention to this breath. Do this every time you feel tense, anxious, happy, excited, angry, sad…… Try it and see what happens.

23Sep/15
r.nial bradshaw |https://flic.kr/p/fBm85W

Repetitive strain injury (RSI)

r.nial bradshaw |https://flic.kr/p/fBm85W

r.nial bradshaw |https://flic.kr/p/fBm85W

Repetitive strain injury (RSI) is one of the office blights so it may seem. Of course you do not have to work in an office to suffer on-going arm or hand pain, or as some call it: WRULD (the rather clunky ‘work related upper limb disorder). You may have tennis elbow or golfer’s elbow, of course without playing either sport — then it should be lateral or medial epicondylalgia! Words aside, this is a big and costly problem for individuals who bear the brunt of the pain, symptoms and their consequential limitations, and for businesses that have employees on light duties or off sick. So how does typing cause an injury?

Well it may not. We are not really designed to be sat, hunched over a desk (as I am now I have just realised), poking away at small buttons, getting quicker and quicker so that we don’t even have to think about where our fingers are going in order to produce a document. The ‘noise’ created by all these small, precise movements of the fingers (signals flying up from the joints and muscles about movement, pressure, touch etc) can be difficult for the brain to gather into a tangible meaning. We start to develop different sensations, perhaps a change in temperature, some tingling, numbness or a sense of size difference (my hands are now warm and a bit tingly). If you interpret this as strange or mildly worrying because you have heard of RSI and you don’t want it because your job involves typing all day…..you can perhaps see how the worry and concern and vigilance and responses begin to amplify and amplify; this without any notable injury. However, the tension that builds, the stress responses that affect tissue health, the change in blood flow and nerve function when anxious, all impact and can create a threat value that is perceived as dangerous and hence the body systems that protect kick in — this may well mean some pain. And pain is useful and normal, even without a significant injury, because pain is a need state, motivating action: maybe I should take breaks? Perhaps I should type less at the moment? Maybe I need to work at changing my thinking about a  situation that is making me stressed? Maybe I should start exercising regularly? Maybe I should seek some help and advice?

On-going use without adequate recovery can lead to an imbalance between tissue breakdown and rebuild, the natural state of change that is constantly occuring to all of us. The inflammation that results can of course add to the level of sensitivity or activate it, leading to aches and pains that can begin in specific locations but with time expand up and down the limb and even be noted in the neck and shoulder. This is not the spread of a ‘disease’, but rather the volume switch being turned up, meaning that increasingly normal stimuli (touch and movement, thought of movement, particular environments) can result in pain. Associations build with stimuli, and we get better and better at certain habits of thought and action that can perpetuate the problem — e.g./ avoidance, expectation, changes in movement, extra muscle tension unbeknownst to us.

There comes a point when the symptoms can begin so quickly that it becomes difficult to type, text, hold light objects and even gesticulate. This makes work life and socialising very challenging as well as frequently occupying much of our thinking, planning and our mental resources from the emotional impact. A comprehensive approach is needed to change direction and begin recovering, from wherever your start point. Certainly if you are feeling a few aches and pains that are becoming more frequent, you would be wise to seek advice. Or if you are struggling, then the right treatment and training programme can help you to resume meaningful activities.

Due to the biology of RSI, like all persisting pains, being upstream in the main, i.e. away from where the pain is felt, any programme must address this as much as improving the health of the tissues locally with movement and use (gradually). Once you undertand your pain, you realise that pain is not an accurate indicator of tissue damage, and that there are many things you can do to take you towards a better life. Asking yourself why you want to get better gives you the answer as to where you want to be going; your direction. We need direction and then the know-how to get there, dealing with distractions on the way, so that we remain focused on the right thinking and actions.

You will have been successful before, using your strengths (e.g./ concentration, empathy, dedication, motivation) and values. Using these same strengths and values to perform the training and to think in the right way leads you to a better outcome. What are your strengths and values? The exercises, training and treatment are all straight-forward, but their effectiveness is impacted upon by the way you think about your pain and your life. There are many factors in your life that are affecting your pain: e.g. tiredness, stress, anxiety, people, places. Understanding these and your pain puts you in a position to make changes and groove healthy habits and in so doing take the focus away from pain and worrying about pain to the doing and enjoying and living. There is only so much you can attend to in a passing moment, so why not focus on the good stuff? And if you are in pain, you can learn how to create conditions for ‘pain-off’ over and over whilst you get healthier and fitter generally as well as specifically training to resume meaningful activities: common problems are typing, texting, carrying etc.

This is an insight into modern thinking about pain and how to overcome pain. We understand so much more and this knowledge is ever-expanding. Passing this knowledge to you with practical ways of using it to overcome pain is our role, and treating you with techniques that calm and ease symptoms whilst you get fitter and stronger. Together we can use your strengths to resume a meaningful life.

Call now to start your programme if you are suffering RSI or if you are a business wanting to reduce risks or develop a programme for your staff: 07518 445493

 

18Sep/15
Jan-Joost Verhoef| https://flic.kr/p/6qqqCU

Sports injuries that don’t go away

Jan-Joost Verhoef| https://flic.kr/p/6qqqCU

Jan-Joost Verhoef| https://flic.kr/p/6qqqCU

There are many cases of sports injuries that don’t go away. They linger on and on, becoming increasingly impacting as the sensitivity builds, often accompanied with varying patterns swelling and stiffness. Understanding what is happening is the key to deciding upon the right action to change course and recover. The way that your body and you respond is determined by the circumstances of the injury, prior experiences (injured the area before? previous injuries?), beliefs about pain and injury, genetics, the immediate thoughts and messages given by others and the action taken at that point, including pain relief. Here are some of the reasons:

  • The circumstances of the injury: how healthy you are, how you are feeling at the time, where you are, how the injury happened (your fault? Someone else’s fault? An accident? In fact, it is how you perceive it that is important, not the actual reality), your first automatic thoughts, the time of the game, the importance of the game — all of these factors come together, physical-emotional to create a memory of that moment, the pain intensity determined by the perceived level of threat, and not the extent of the tissue damage (consider the player who has a break but does not realise until later). The way you and your body respond to an injury will be very different if you are stressed vs relaxed for example.
  • Previous injuries leave their mark in terms of how you think about them and the associated pain. If you have injured the area before, then there is a greater likelihood that it will hurt because the body will protect more readily. If you have had a good or a bad experience before, this affects how your body systems that heal and protect will kick in.
  • Your beliefs about pain and injury that began to be sculpted in the early days of bumps and bruises and in particular how people around you reacted — too much mollycoddling by parents/teachers is perhaps not great for how we learn to deal effectively with injury; that’s both in the way we think but also how our biological systems work. What you are thinking will impact upon the pain (‘I must get up and play on in this cup final’ vs ‘it is the end of my career’ = very different biologies), and hence the early messages given by the clinicians and therapists must be accurate and calming.
  • It seems that we can have a genetic predisposition to over-responding to injury, with inflammation kicking in as it should but more vigorously. Some people are more inflammatory that others so it seems.
  • The early actions after an injury, including the messages as mentioned above, are really important to set up healing. It is normal for an injury to hurt, however in cases of severe pain, this needs to be addressed with the right analgesia. Early high levels of pain can affect the trajectory of the problem.

For these reasons and others, some injuries appear to persist or recur, which is highly frustrating for the individual, and for the therapists. Sometimes the factors mentioned above set into place a level of sensitivity and certain protective behaviours that mean protection is vigorous — this in terms of the way the person thinks, acts and their biology plays out. This needs to be identified as quickly as possible so that the right treatment can be administered alongside working with the player to developing his or her thinking. Whatever is playing out in their minds will be affecting their biological responses, in a positive or a negative way, so we must intervene or encourage depending on the predominant thought processes.

When an individual is experiencing an on-going issue there are a range of factors to consider and address, some relating to the points above. Hearing their complete story is a vital start point, including an understanding of their perception of the events to date, as well as prior experiences that will flavour what happened then and what is happening now.

Here are some examples of the common features:

  • Often the body continues to try and heal, squirting inflammatory chemicals into the area periodically or in response to movement. This is neurogenic inflammation and sensitises just like inflammation from a fresh injury and is part of the sensitised state, but co-ordinated by higher centres
  • Rarely does the person understand their pain, which creates worry and concern. Remember that chronic stress can make us more inflammatory — also consider other life stresses as these will impact; if the body/person is in survive mode (fright-flight), then resources for healing and recovery are limited.
  • Altered movement patterns, in part from fear/lack of confidence but also as part of protect mode. These must be re-trained from the right baseline (often people start too far down the line and fail)
  • A belief that there is a re-injury when in fact it is a flare up, or an increase in sensitivity, not an actual injury

In brief, we must ensure that the individual’s thinking is right — understand pain and injury, their pain and injury — and that they are taking the right actions towards recovery (a negative thought or over-training will not take you towards recovery); but they need to be able to think clearly about this themselves, because they are with themselves all the time whereas the therapist is with them periodically. They need to become their own coach, which is why I developed the Pain Coach Programme — not only are we coaching them, but also teaching them to become their own coach. When the understanding and thinking is in place, the training and exercises are all straightforward. I use no fancy tools or kit to coach and treat, except of course the most fancy piece of kit we all possess, our brains! But let’s not be all brain-centric; we are talking whole person. It is the person who is injured, not their leg or arm; it is the person who feels pain in the context of who they believe they are and in their life, not a leg or an arm. The person feels hungry, not their stomach. Remembering this when educating, coaching and treating creates the right thinking platform.

Pain Coach 1:1 Mentoring Programme for Clinicians — see here or call us 07518 445493

25Aug/15
IMG_0175.JPG

I am in pain

We often say I am in pain but does this really describe what is happening. Knit-picking perhaps, but I think that what we say, the words we use and the way that we use them are fundamental to being human and who we are as individuals. The innumerable phrases that have been passed down the generations will have their origins in a time was very different. So how relevant are they now? And how useful?

Someone says to you, I am in pain and instinctvely you know what they mean. You cannot possibly know what they feel or how they are feeling it, but you know that they are feeling something unpleasant and want you to know about it. There is a point to telling others about your pain, perhaps to seek help or advice, to gain sympathy or to give reason for non-participation for example. These are all accepted reaons for sharing, and would typically be known as part of the social dimension of pain.

However, we cannot really be ‘in’ pain. We can feel pain, pain can emerge from our very being (this includes our body) and pain can hurt, but you cannot be in pain. You can be in a house, a car or tent. Being in something suggests that you can get out. If you say that you are in pain, it suggests that you can get out of pain. Now, pain changes and is transformed (we are not in a constant state of anything, hence pain comes and goes like any other state–pain is part of a protective state), but you cannot get out of pain because you cannot be in pain. There is no entrance or doorway to pain that once you have entered requires you to find an exit.

Should we change our terminology and what effect would that have? I don’t think it will really change anytime soon, however when clinicians are thinking about the pain being described by an individual, it is more accurate to  consider the whole person from where the pain emerges in a particular location, with the underpinning biology involving many systems upstream of the lived experience. A story book requires a reader, words on a page and the book to be bound together. The book is the body that is read yet the reader must take the words and create a meaning, a story that makes sense, lived in his or her whole person–a beautiful description is felt and lived through the whole person involving complex biology that is a blended mind-body; embodied cognition. Our body is a story book yet the story is our experience. Changing the terminology will occur with time and as the understanding of pain evolves.

The growth of pain understanding is vital as a basis for informed choices and treatment choices–one of the biggest reasons for chronic pain being the number one global health burden is the lack of understanding, whereby the medical model continues to predominate treatment choices; i.e./ target treatment at the place where pain is felt in the body. This misses the point of pain as part of the way in which a whole person protects himself/herself, and indeed much of our common language contributes to an old belief system that our generation has been brought up upon. Evolution takes time and of course a new and more complex explanation to replace one that is simple, will be threatening. Nonetheless, this is where we will go as people experience failed treatments or do not reach the expected outcomes alongside developments in pain science that become increasingly known in the public domain. This knowledge will demand that things continue to change, and as a result so will our language. As is common though, this is a two way street and if we take opportunites to change our language, then we are using the social dimensions of pain to create learning opportunities that lay the foundation for perceptual shifts. And there’s one thing that changes pain, and that’s a perceptual shift.

Richmond with Georgie Standage co-founded UP | Understand Pain, a campaign to raise awareness of the problem of pain and what we can do to overcome pain — we are no longer managing pain, we are changing pain and coaching people back to a meaningful life. The next UP event is in October when more than 1000 singers will be performing; even more than last time! 

The Pain Coach Programme is a comprehensive strengths based approach to overcoming pain. Call us on 07518 445493 to start your programme.

20Jul/15
vintage typewriter by philhearing | https://flic.kr/p/9pRzps

Gillian’s story | back pain and mindfulness

vintage typewriter by philhearing | https://flic.kr/p/9pRzps

vintage typewriter by philhearing | https://flic.kr/p/9pRzps

Many thanks for Gillian’s story | back pain and mindfulness

MY PAIN STORY – GILLIAN WESTON

I am always a busy person; I play short mat bowls several times a week and have represented my County and England, I run a Junior session for bowls, I love to swim and I am a member of Horsham Rock Choir. I use a computer as the main part of my job of Practice Manager for a charity.

My problems began in 2010 when I slipped on some ice and inadvertently tried to break my fall with my left arm. I had restricted movement and upper arm nerve pain but after some physio my situation improved.

In Dec 2012 I developed pain in both arms after lifting a heavy object at work. I was referred for physio in Jan 2013 when I was diagnosed with tennis elbow in my right arm and shoulder impingement/tennis elbow in the left. After some exercises my right arm improved but I had further physio in the following months for my left arm. During this time the worst aspect was the nerve pain from my elbow to my hand – no painkillers relieved it, and I was in constant pain with or without movement, even scratching my face or lifting a kettle were agony!

In September 2013 when I was still in a lot of pain and had a further condition added – ulnar nerve entrapment – I was given 2 steroid injections. There was an improvement but of course the underlying problems were still there and in January 2014 there was a return of my intense pain. A further course of steroids followed, but the actual injection was excruciatingly painful and I was left with numbness in my ring finger. I was pain free until Nov 2014 when I moved a pot in the garden and experienced a twinge in my elbow, the problem was exacerbated when I used a simple screwdriver in Dec at work and I ended up in the worst pain I had had for some time.

By Jan 2015 I was at the end of my tether and rather than go the NHS route saw a physio who I knew privately. She felt that my neck was also the cause of my problem plus bad posture. Her approach was more holistic and she gave me some acupressure to try and calm me down from my very distressed state. She even suggested counselling as she was concerned about my mental health as a direct result. I was at various times loaned a TENS machine, given ultrasound and massaged. She helped me address by posture and gave discussed calming techniques. She discussed with me how my mental state was affecting my pain but I was sceptical about this at the time and more or less dismissed it. There was a degree of improvement in my condition over the following month thanks to the new physiotherapist but I was still struggling day to day.

During all these periods in and out of pain I have had to stop playing bowls and going swimming, use my right hand more – particularly with the mouse at work, been unable to sleep on my left side, been restricted doing the dance moves at choir, and not been able to do many day to day things that I used to take for granted.

In March 2015 I attended Heathrow Airport with Horsham Rock Choir where Georgie Standage my choir leader and Richmond Stace were hosting an event for UP. I took one of the flyers and did my research via the UP website. I found the videos very interesting – in particular the one explaining how “all pain comes from the brain” (Lorimer Moseley). I took particular interest too in the mindfulness videos. But I also found the written information really useful too. Over the following weeks I used mindfulness apps and also ‘talked’ myself out of pain. When I felt pain I closed my eyes and tried to focus on other parts of my body; if I hit my weakened elbow (as I do frequently!) I told myself that it was fine, it would hurt for a while and then I’d be OK. I used Mindfulness to keep me calm and I found that my nerve pain lessened in the weeks that followed.

By May I was able to resume my bowls for short periods to use my mouse at work left handed, do my Rock Choir moves without pain and return to swimming. Significantly I can sleep for periods on my left side without pain – which I haven’t done for a long time!

It is now July 2015 and I have been pain free for just over 3 months–other than the odd elbow bash! I do get the occasional twinge, and very interestingly if I am stressed about anything I get a bit of nerve pain in my arm! Looking back some of the worst pain ties in with significant stressful times in my life. I am still wary and careful about exacerbating things, but importantly I feel that “yes I do have pain sometimes, but pain doesn’t have me”. I am indebted to UP for giving me my life back, and I continue to use the techniques I have learnt – in particular the Mindfulness Breathing – to keep me calm and in control.

20Jul/15
Photomarathon - Alphabet by Eva Van Ostade | https://flic.kr/p/i84n6g

My A to Z of pain

Photomarathon - Alphabet by Eva Van Ostade | https://flic.kr/p/i84n6g

Photomarathon – Alphabet by Eva Van Ostade | https://flic.kr/p/i84n6g

My A to Z of pain –

This is by no means exhaustive, but rather a brainstorm of some of the most salient features of the Pain Coach Programme to overcome chronic pain and injury.

I am sure that I will mould this and re-shape it in time, as you are also free to from this basic framework. At the heart of the thinking lies the person suffering persisting pain, whereby their sense of self and who they feel that they are has been compromised and affected by the pain. Pain often becomes all-encompassing, pervading into all corners of one’s existence. Except that this need not be the case as we understand our pain, develop our thinking to take the right action and focus, utterly focus upon the vision of how we want to be living. All too often the messages given and auto-suggested are negative and inaccurate and hence as soon as the thinking is right and based on what we really know about pain, the person will see the opportunity to move forward towards a meaningful life once more.

A to Z of pain:

Attitude to pain affects what you think and the action you take.

Behaviours are chosen based on your beliefs; work on your beliefs about pain by really understanding it.

Change happens in the wake of developing your thinking about pain.

Decide to focus on what you can do rather than what you can’t.

Energise yourself with movement, breathing, diet and engagement with people who nourish you and make you feel good.

Focus on your vision of who you want to be and what you want to be doing. Re-visit this focus often each day.

Galvanise your strengths and focus on them to develop and grow.

Habits of health created by you.

Intelligent emotionally to be aware of how you and others are feeling so that you can make positive changes by focusing on your strengths.

Jump for joy as often as you can; if not literally, then in your mind — imagine jumping!

Kick unhealthy habits by developing your strengths.

Laughter has great effects on health and you.

Meaning is key for engagement at work and in relationships, so create a meaning for all these situations.

Notice what is happening right now; be mindful and see how anxiety drops and you feel better. When you feel better, your pain feels better.

Observe your thoughts rather than being embroiled in them.

Persevere to achieve your vision.

Quiet time to re-charge.

Refresh often during the day with movement, breathing and creating calmness in your mind.

Success comes with perseverance, choosing to think positively, learning from mistakes and focusing upon your vision.

Tell yourself positive messages over and over and notive how you feel — also using your own body language: sit up, stand tall, be proud becasue you are worthy.

Understand your pain is undoubtedkly the fisrt step in overcoming pain.

Virtues and morals drive what we do because that’s what we believe. They should be in synch with those of our relationships and work.

Worthy of overcoming pain and living a meaningful life – you are!

X factor is something we all have. Use it to motivate yourself and change emotional gears.

Yes I can.

Zzzz’s are an absolute must for health. 8 hours.

* These thoughts derive from the Pain Coach Programme for overcoming chronic pain.

There is a programme for individuals suffering chronic pain and a mentoring programme for clinicians who work with people with chronic pain problems who want to develop their skills and strengths. Call us now: 07518 445493

13Jul/15
By Tess Watson | https://flic.kr/p/8W6Gkm

Pain and society

By Tess Watson | https://flic.kr/p/8W6Gkm

By Tess Watson | https://flic.kr/p/8W6Gkm

Pain and society — Pain is an issue in society, and for society. Why pain has become the number one global health burden is a question that we must consider and answer using on-going study of what pain really is, how it influences us, how we influence pain, how pain emerges from individuals who form society and how society views pain. No mean task, however we must envision where we want to be as a society and focus on getting there.

One of the biggest problems with pain is that it is misunderstood. The predominent thinking remains in the pathological and body structure camp as an explanation for pain. This thinking needs to develop across the whole of society, in fact begining in schools where I believe children should be taught about pain.

Fear is a huge factor in pain — what does this mean? Will it get better? Will this pain ever go away? Etc etc. Of course those who understand pain will know that these very thoughts are ample to fuel further protection and hence pain. We need people to understand that pain emerges in them as an individual, very much flavoured the situation in which the pain is noted, influenced by past experiences, beliefs about pain and immediate thoughts and emotions. There are reams of papers examining these factors. The early messages are vital when someone has injured themeselves or suffre an acute episode of pain. The right thinking from the outset creates a way forward with effective behaviours and actions to allow the body systems to co-ordinate healing and recovery. Unnecessary fear and worry simply divert resources away from these processes and hence affect the outcomes. We do not need to fear pain but rather, take action and deal with pain.

When someone has more persisting pain, and this is likely due to certain vulnerabilities that we are understanding more and more, again the mesages must be clear and accurate. The notions of management and coping are just not good enough. We can deliver much better care, advice, coaching and treatment than ‘management’ implies. This is beneficial for the individual, the funder and hence society as a whole. Society needs to be purporting the right messages about pain and therefore we need to develop thinking on a large scale.

When I studies the Pain MSc at Kings College London under Dr Mick Thacker, I used to wonder why it was called ‘Pain: science and society’. Whilst I do not know the exact reasons for KCL’s entitling of the course, now it is obvious to me that we have a huge societal problem that needs urgent attention. There is a responsibility for all of us to come together and develop so that change occurs in the wake of new thinking based on the huge amount of research into pain. We need the support of the policy makers, businesses and individuals. Why policy makers and business? Because we can change what is happening now including the vast cost of chronic pain — this huge pot of money could become available for many other areas of life. So let’s move forward together.

If you are a policy maker or a business recognising the effects of chronic pain on society or upon your business, contact me for information on shifting and devloping thinking to take big action. t 07518 445493

Pain and society by Richmond Stace