Category Archives: Motivation

27Apr/14

Never give up — a motivational talk

Diana Nyad swam 100 miles across a stretch of water between Cuba and Florida. She just kept going. The internal drive and the support that fuelled this drive kept her going in some of the most dangerous waters on the planet.

Rehabilitation and recovery from an injury or painful problem requires dedicated perseverance. But to optimise this perseverance we need to be motivated and inspired. We need to understand and know why; we need a purpose to drive us forward and keep moving forward. There are plateaus, flare-ups (when the symptoms and pain can increase), good days and bad days — life’s normal variation. Knowing why this happens, what we can do and why we are doing it keeps us moving forward.

Listen to Diana Nyed speak here about her experience and keeping going.

For information about our pain treatment programmes that are driven and inspired by neuroscience, explore the website and contact us on 07932 689081 to move forward

20Jul/13

Creating the right conditions to move forward

3 key points

1. Nothing happens in isolation.

2. We are designed to change, grow and develop.

3. Nothing is permanent.

Bearing these fundamental points in mind, we seek to create and then cultivate the right conditions so that we may move forward in life. In terms of rehabilitation, we also look to create the conditions to achieve wellness that manifests in an ability to perform at home, at work and on the field of play.

Nothing happens in isolation: we are on a continuous pathway with an underpinning genetic make up that is sculpted by our experiences and environment (epigenetics). So when we experience a pain or an injury, the immediate physiological and behavioural responses that so affect the pain perception, will be determined by what we know and by what our brain knows (we do not know all the things that our brain knows. Or our nose knows). When designing and implementing a training programme for a painful condition, this is an important principle as the patient will have a story leading to the point when they exercise that will determine the response including what they have done physically, how they are feeling and what they are thinking. Anticipation and expectation must be addressed.

We are designed to change: neuroplasticity is a feature of the neuroimmune system that allows us to learn and change. However, the mindset around this is key. We must understand the we can change and have a belief that it is possible in order to behave in a way that will promote forward movement in life. This must be addressed in any rehabilitation programme and indeed it may be that thinking needs to be ‘rehabilitated’ as well.

Nothing is permanent: the concept of impermanence comes from Buddhism. Nothing is permanent, even pain and other symptoms. They change as does our thinking, emotional state and body sense. We may not think it does and particularly in suffering on-going pain. However, the intensity, quality, location and nature of pain changes regularly and this is because the neuroimmune system is dynamic, ever-responding to the internal and external environments. This is why the context of the situation is so key in pain. We must think about this in rehabilitation: the context of the training.

In summary, the natural processes within the body are simply designed for us. To maximise their potential we must create the right conditions for these processes to act and this means considering the physical, cognitive and emotional dimensions of the pain experience and how they interact. A single leg squat is a single leg squat, but what is the person thinking about the single leg squat, have they done it before, will the brain consider it to be safe, where are they doing it, when are they doing it……..the list of considerations goes on. Lets consider them.

For further information about our treatment and training programmes or to book your first session, call us on 07932 689081

16Jul/13

Two excellent talks for athletes

Both talks are inspiring and demonstrate courage, perseverance and motivation in the face of the enormous challenges that were presented. In performance and rehabilitation, mindset is a key determinant and in many cases several skills must be developed, including resilience and coping strategies.

In the first video, Janine Shepherd talks about her experience of recovery following a severe injury.

In the second, Aimee Mullins talks in 1998 about her record-setting career as a runner, and about her carbon-fiber prosthetic legs.

Call us now to find out about our comprehensive treatment and training programmes to tackle persisting pain, recurring injuries and chronic pain: 07932 689081