Category Archives: Football injuries

24Nov/14

One injury, and then another…and another….

It is a common scenario sadly, both in professional and amateur sports. One injury, then another and another, each demoralising further. It is noteworthy that the science of pain would say that expectations and other thoughts about the pain and injury will affect the pain itself, potentially increasing the overall threat value — recall from previous writings that pain is a response to threat, and not to just that of the actual injury itself. We must consider any threat to the whole person, and this includes thoughts about oneself and one’s career.

When the body is sensitised by an initial injury, despite healing this sensitivity can persist subtly. In other words, at a certain level of activity there is no problem, no defence. But reaching a new level of training may then reach the current threshold that is not yet back to normal. The threshold is the physiological point where messages are scrutinised by the neuroimmune system that is already vigilant to potential threat. There does not need to be an actual threat, just a perceived one by these vigilant body systems, which then triggers a biological defence: pain, altered planning of movement, altered thinking etc.

The continuous journey back to full fitness requires a complete integration of physical and mental preparedness. As well as tissue strength, endurance and mobility, the controlling mechanisms must switch back to normal settings rather than protect — i.e. the upstream: muscles do what they are told by the motor system that originates in the motor areas of the brain, and the motor system plans and executes movement. The planning of movement not only occurs when the ball is about to be kicked or a run begun, but also when thinking about the acts or watching another. As well as these influencing what is happening, these are also great rehabilitation tools to fully prepare the system for the rigours of the game as well as ensuring completeness of recovery: the player resumes the right thinking, decision-making, motor control as well as fitness.

 

23Nov/14

Why do Arsenal and MUFC have so many injuries?

Arsenal Football Club have apparently reported 30 injuries since August, and Manchester United 37 injuries. Why so many?

Injuries are more complex than perhaps initially thought. It is not simply that a player runs out onto the field, clatters into another player, changes direction or bursts into action. There is a huge amount of multi-system activity, both conscious and unconscious that biologically underpins every injurious situation.

For example, a seemingly ‘simple’ ankle sprain is this: a disrupted ligament releases inflammatory chemicals that excite the normally quiet danger receptors on nociceptors; nociceptors send danger signals to the spinal cord to communicate with secondary neurons that are influenced by a flow of signals coming downwards from the brain. The sum of this give and take reaches the brain. According to whether a threat is determined or not, the appropriate response is pain, drawing attention to the affected area so that the right behaviour can be assumed, promoting recovery and survival. Pain is a need state, driving and motivating action.

The danger signals, for there are no pain signals or even a pain centre in the brain, are chemical messages until given meaning by the emotional centres of the brain. This is based on the context of the situation, beliefs, immediate thoughts, previous experience and the environment to name but a few. The injury is deeply embedded within all these factors, none of which are stand alone.

To illustrate, a professional footballer who sprains his ankle could think: ‘how will this affect my career?’, ‘how long will I be out?’, ‘will this affect selection?’, ‘is this the end of my career?’, ‘what will this cost me?’ etc. The question to ask is how is this thinking likely to affect pain? Are those thought threatening? Of course they are, and hence affect the way in which the body protects. As well as promoting the right environment for healing (bottom up), one has to create the right conditions in all body systems (top down) by cultivating the right thinking and with definite action. Until thoughts and beliefs flavour nociceptive signalling, there is no meaning, and without meaning there is no pain. We need pain to survive, but we also need a logical and rational meaning.

Within the culture of football, there are certain beliefs and memes around injury. This will be the case regarding ankles, hamstrings and groins. Just listen to the pundits to hear their comments on these injuries to know this fact. How much of it is fear-based rather than being based on pain science and basic biology? Tackle this and you are more than half-way towards creating the right conditions for recovery.

Injury is incredibly complex because we are incredibly complex. Drawing upon this modern way of thinking about pain and injury and I believe we can tackle this increasing problem of recurring injuries in sport more effectively.

Persisting sports injury? Recurring injury? Football injury? Call now 07518 445493

18Oct/14

More Premiership injury woe

Headlines today in The Guardian sport section report that Daniel Sturridge is suffering from a further strain, this time in his calf. I do not know if this is the same leg as the thigh strain from which he has recently recovered, but if so, I would not be surprised. In addition, we learn that Raheem Stirling told Roy Hodgson that his legs were sore. Anyone who plays sports will know that feeling.

A second injury or pain on the same side — why?

When we injure a muscle or ligament, inflammatory chemicals are released locally. Danger-sensing nerves (nociceptors) are activated by these chemicals when their threshold of firing is lowered. Danger signals are sent to the spinal cord, where modulation takes place with signals being sent down from the brain — these are in response to thoughts, emotions, context, perceived danger etc. The danger signals are then sent up to the brain via a second neuron, where an analysis of what is happening takes place. On concluding that there is danger, pain emerges from the body in the place where it is thought the problem lies. The body uses cortical (brain) maps to allocate the pain in the body. Put simply, the biology of pain does not reside in the injured tissues but instead involves the protective functioning of many body systems working together.

Once protection kicks in, pain draws our attention to the area, our movement changes as does our thinking amongst other things. This does not involve only the injured body region, but widespread responses of body systems that protect us from actual and potential threat. The original injury goes through a healing process — we have incredibly potent healing abilities — yet the sensitivity and protection can persist. If, for example, the thigh is strained, it is all the ‘wiring’ that involves the leg that will be on alert. Without full resolution, and this includes confidence in the body, the systems are primed and hence during this period it is easier to ‘pick up’ another injury. Sometimes there is an actual injury and damage, but often there is nothing discernible yet it hurts in the same way. Differentiating an actual injury from the sensation of an injury is important. Players and coaches understanding these mechanisms (of pain) is vital in my view, so that these problems can be tackled efficiently. It would be straight-forward to deliver a mandatory, FA backed education package — contact me for details of an education programme.

In summary, why do pains appear on the same side? Because the initial sensitivity has not fully resolved in the case when no actual injury can be found. If there is a strain or sprain detected, there is a good chance that motor control, body sense and awareness and or confidence are not complete. Of course, there is always the possibility of just plain old bad luck, however I would suggest that it is more likely that the body remains in a degree of protection mode.

Aching legs and recovery

Briefly, the body needs time to recover from the demands of exercise. This can be all out rest for a short period but also active rest that would be a lower intensity of movement and activity; a skills based session for example. There are ways of enhancing recovery that include focused movements and body awareness exercises as well as the practice of mindfulness. We have a great ability to adapt, and in fact our body systems are continually changing and adapting to our lifestyles. This is one of the reasons for chronic health problems in a society that is ‘wired’ and ‘immediate’. Put simply, our bodies are not designed in this way.

Educating players about pain, injury, recovery and health empowers them to make good decisions. With coaches and managers also understanding these principles, it creates a positive culture with clear communication about injury and pain. A player should always feel that he can talk openly about how he is feeling, physically and mentally — although I would argue that these are one and the same because we are whole person: genes, character, personality, experience, knowledge, beliefs, mind, body etc., with no single feature standing above the others.

Contact me for information about pain seminars and training at your club — 07518 445493

 

28Sep/14

Premiership football injuries — all too common, time to re-think

Opening the sports pages this morning (Saturday), the news is abound with the football injuries in the Premiership. Manchester United report nine unfit players just a few weeks into the season. Nasri is ‘out for a month’ as he is due to have surgery for a ‘serious groin injury’ — if it is a serious groin injury and requires surgery, how can Nasri be back in one month whilst allowing for healing, re-training of body sense and control, fitness and an ability to perform free of any thoughts that impact upon his play? A return without fully addressing these fundamental factors will set Nasri up for a greater risk of future problems.

Just as the thinking in pain, the largest global health burden, needs to be constantly challenged, so does the way we think about injuries in football and sport.

Clubs, managers, fans and players alike want a rapid return to the field. The financial and footballing culture demands that players are back as soon as possible. The pressure is great, but pressure is created by the way one thinks and perceives a situation. Change the thinking and a different system will emerge that allows for improved preventative strategies, full recovery and gradual return. 80% recovered is not good enough, 90% recovered is not good enough; unless of course the risk of re-ignition of pain is deemed to be acceptable. We should always aim for a full and sustainable recovery.

There are simple ways of evolving thinking, beginning with players really understanding pain and injury — for example, the poor relationship between pain and the extent of tissue damage, the many influences upon how we control movement and perform, the context around an injury and how this affects the body’s response. This education and training should equally be delivered to managers, coaches and club owners. The biggest issues are the lack of understanding of pain and the communication around the injury. With understanding of pain and clear communication from the outset, there is a strong basis for optimal recovery.

Some pains come from incidents, such as a tackle (direct trauma) or a turn of pace (hamstring strain), and others from a prior injury that has not fully recovered or emerge as a result of the body gradually protecting itself more and more. This latter scenario develops from incomplete recovery from normal training and match play, i.e. there is not enough rest and recuperation time for normal tissue breakdown-rebuild. Both of these scenarios need greater consideration to keep the players playing. And sometimes, the wisest action is that they do not play.

Drawing upon the neuroscience of pain and performance, persisting injury problems in football can be addressed in such a way as to sustainably reduce the risk of re-injury and on-going niggles. We accept that sport can hurt. But when performance is compromised by factors that we can address, for the sakes of all those involved, we can think differently and take the treatment of injuries to a new level that is all about learning and moving forwards.

If you are a player struggling to return to play or a club, call us now to start your recovery: 07932 689081

12Mar/13

Early messages about pain

Our immediate and early thoughts about an injury or pain that we feel can have a significant impact upon how we cope and manage the problem. It is therefore vital that we have a really good understanding of what is normal and what we can do to optimise the conditions for healing.

Within this early experience, the messages that we hear from those involved including family, friends, team mates and healthcare professionals, can have a profound influence upon our beliefs about the injury that pervade our on-going, personal approach to recovery.

The way in which we behave when we are injured, in other words the actions we choose to take, will be determined by our belief system. This system evolves from a very early age as we learn what is dangerous in life, absorb messages from significant others (parents, teachers etc) and create strategies to deal with pain and injury. Cultural memes are those passed from generation to generation, keeping the story alive. However, these can be based on erroneous information and be perpetuating an ineffective way of handling pain. On this basis, we have an obligation to pass on information that is based upon what we know about pain rather than simply taking the actions of our predecessors, ‘because that was the way they did it’.

The messages and information given to an individual about their injury and pain need to be based upon fact. Imagery provoked by language such as ‘your spine is crumbling’ and ‘your joint is worn out’ can and often do create fear of movement and sensitise our thinking. Thinking is as much neuronal activity in the brain as a movement and we can easily become sensitised to our own sensitivity via this cognitive-emotional route. How quickly can we develop a fear? In a flash.

Imagery is potent. Close your eyes and think about placing a yellow, ripe, juicy lemon segment on your lips and tongue.

The medical management of an acute injury is important: i.e./ diagnosis, investigation, RICE. All of these you would expect. But, we also need to understand and know what is NORMAL and pain is NORMAL in this situation. Unpleasant yes, normal yes. Need for control with medication? By and large yes.

Let’s make sure that we send the right signals with effective language that promotes the right thinking and consequent behaviours.

 

11Dec/12

What does your pain mean to you? Learning from the #Messi injury

“I sincerely thought it was the last ball I would be touching for a long time because of the pain,” Messi said. “I tried to go ahead and shoot but I didn’t have the strength.”

Last week Lionel Messi, arguably the World’s best footballer, thought that his career had come to an end with a knee injury. The crowd thought the same as they watched him fall to the ground having collided with the Benfica goalkeeper. Messi was rounding Artur when the players came together at speed. He continued to run and kick the ball but then fell to the floor clutching his leg. Messi’s first thought was that it was the end of his career because of the severity of the pain.

The moment of injury triggers a range of physical and behavioural responses. If tissues are damaged, the healing process begins with inflammation. In many cases this is painful but not always immediately. The first thoughts arise automatically based on the saliency or meaning of the situation and will influence the pain perception. In Messi’s case, the pain was severe, he was holding his knee without knowing the extent of the injury and made a split-second assessment. Understandably his and the crowd’s thoughts were catastrophic, playing out unimaginable scenarios that provoke further responses in the body. There was silence in the stands by all accounts.

The brain is firing on all cylinders at this point, working out what is going on in the body as it receives danger signals from nerves around the knee. We are unaware of the processing of this information from the body. Blending with existing knowledge and past experiences, the brain responds with a range of protective measures if it deems that there is a threat to the body. This can include pain to attract our attention, spasm to reduce movement of the area, altered movement patterns to escape or protect (e.g. limping) and autonomic responses that are triggered by a perceived threat (e.g. sweating, increased heart rate). Clearly Messi’s brain had decided it was a good idea to protect his knee.

Of course, the meaning of a knee injury is very different to a professional footballer in comparison to someone else. Similar to the violin player with a paper cut on his index finger on the day of a big concert. In the clear light of day, Messi and his fans now know that the injury was not serious and that the recovery will be straightforward. The meaning has changed and so will Messi’s pain experience. This was clearly demonstrated by two goals scored in the next game.

This episode is a great example of the fact that pain is not an accurate indicator of tissue damage. The alarm system rang out in full volume for Messi and for good reason. So why did it hurt so much, and it really did, when we now know that there was only a mild injury (a bony bruise)?

Science and clinical experience tells us that pain is an output from the brain in response to a perceived threat. The sensation of pain is allocated to the part of the body deemed to be in danger via the body’s representation (maps of the body) that exists in different parts of the brain*. With pain being an output from the brain, it means that there are a number of modulating factors that can amplify the experience, including the meaning of the situation, catastrophic thinking and expectation. Hence the salience for Messi: his leg, his career. Understandably then, the brain is going to protect and potently so.

The science of pain also helps us to understand why players can be seemingly severely injured and a few minutes later be sprinting down the field. The set of behaviours that we see can of course be play-acting to make certain gains. However there will be those who are tackled, experience intense pain that lasts for just a few moments and then resolves as the brain diminishes the threat value of the situation.

Fortunately for Messi and his fans, he has resumed normal service. Now that the footballing world has breathed a sigh of relief we can look at the sequence of events and learn from Messi’s experience: the context of the injury is key, the meaning is vital, responses do vary and the pain is real. Understanding pain is very important. Arguably it should be part of a player education programme so that responses to pain and injury can be optimised in terms of recovery and rehabilitation.

Richmond Stace MCSP MSc (Pain) BSc (Hons) | Specialist Pain Physiotherapist

Pain Education Programmes for Athletes 

We deliver group and individual pain education sessions to develop the understanding of pain. Knowledge of the experience of pain, including the neurobiology and range of influences, optimises positive responses to injury and conditions.

* This can be a difficult concept to grasp although phantom limb pain can help with the understanding. In this condition, the individual has lost a limb yet feels pain and other sensations in the body part that is no longer there. This is very real pain.

03Sep/12

Another hamstring injury, but how serious is it?

The hamstring injury is one of football’s blights, affecting so many of our best known players. The latest is Andy Carroll who sustained the injury yesterday in his first game at West Ham – read here. The extent of the injury will be clearer following a scan. Hopefully this will be a minor insult that will be fully resolved with a rapid, yet safe return to play.

A study published this year in the BMJ looked at the use of the MRI scan as a prognostic tool for lay-off after hamstring injuries in professional footballers and the association between the MRI findings and injury circumstances. It was found that: ‘70% per cent of hamstring injuries seen in professional football are of radiological grade 0 or 1, meaning no signs of fibre disruption on MRI, but still cause the majority of absence days’. This is an interesting point as it demonstrates that significant time out of football for hamstring problems is not underpinned by serious tissue damage. We know that pain is not an accurate indicator of tissue damage and certainly I have seen many patients who experience repeated injury, yet there is no clinical evidence for an inflammatory response, the early stage of healing.

The seriousness of the injury can be measured by the impact it has upon the player’s ability to perform. This would include the time it takes to return to the field. It appears from the aforementioned study that the tissue basis for the injury does not explain the extent of the lay-off. What other factors could play a role?

The circumstances around an injury include the state of the tissues and mind in the lead up to the incident. Nothing happens in isolation. There is a background to any injury, even if it is sustained during a tackle, sprint or other seemingly unique event. The background includes general fitness, tissue health, stress, emotional state, hydration, fatigue and a previous experience of injury, particularly if it is in the same body region.

A new or recurring injury – what to do?

Therefore, when assessing a new injury, pain or recurrence, it is vital to consider these factors to establish early on the potential risks for longevity of the condition. A rapid diagnosis, reassurance and a plan certainly help. The player needs to know what has happened, what can be done and what they will need to do to get back to the field of play. This is the same for any level of participation. The immediate way in which the inury is managed and thought about by the player can have an impact upon the recovery. For example, if the injury is ridden with fear and concern, often unhelpful choices are made with regards to self-treatment. Knowledge allows for adjustment and effective management to move forwards through the healing process proactively towards the more functional stages of recovery without unneccesary anxiety.

Pain without an obvious injury or damage

Pain can often exists without any significant damage to the tissues, or any at all in some cases. A problem can present as a hamstring pull, it feels like a hamstring pull, yet there is no sign of an actual injury. Equally, a player could rupture muscle fibres and not feel the pain immediately. In most cases the pain is largely co-existent with the injury, but as we have seen, there does not have to be a huge tear. The message is that we should not use pain as the sole guide to the severity of the injury, however we must seek to treat the pain in the best way we can to reduce the risk of pathological behaviours developing-that would prolong revovery. In a less acute situation when there are no clear signs of injury, often there is sensitivity to movement in the sciatic nerve that has become excited through the mechanism or irritated by inflammatory molecules. This can be highlighted with the slump test. The sciatic nerve supplies the hamstring muscles and when sensitive can manifest pain in any of the tissues in which it innervates.

Summary

The seriousness of an injury is very individual with a hamstring injury potentially affecting the career and income of the professional player versus the inconvenience and disappointment of an amateur, part-time player, although with no-less suffering. How much damage has been sustained will also vary and cannot be assessed purely on the basis of the amount of pain. Many factors influence how an individual responds and copes with an injury, and certainly fortifying these mechanisms is key in the early stages with rapid diagnosis, reassurance and treatment.

If you are suffering recurring hamstring injuries, call us now on 07518 445493 to learn what you can do to tackle the problem and return to playing football

29Aug/12

Back pain in football and sport

Back pain is a common experience across society. Millions are spent each year on treatment yet we do not seem to be making any significant progress in tackling this vast problem. Undoubtedly footballers are also subject to spinal aches and pains, either from a direct injury or insidiously. Most people whom I see fall into the latter category, when the pain comes on gradually, the individual seeking help when the pain reaches a troubling level.

Frequently back pain is blamed upon a disc injury, a facet joint problem, arthritis or a ligament sprain. In the acute stages the muscles often tighten or spasm making it very difficult to move. The pain can be extremely intense and worrying, but in fact this is a normal body response to the problem, even if there is no significant damage to the tissues. It can sometimes take a few days for this to subside, with any movement triggering pain–when we move our arms and legs, because the trunk muscles are also being used it means that they can tighten and be painful.

Acute pain – seek help if you are unsure

The general advice with acute back pain is to remain active as possible. Usually your GP will suggest pain relief or anti-inflammatory medication to help ease the symptoms. Gentle and tolerable exercise maintains the tissue mobility meaning that movement becomes easier and easier. Typically the back will stiffen when we do not move, being painful and tight when we have to change position. Sometimes our posture is altered and we tilt forward or to one side, the muscles pulling the spine into a position of protection. Arguably pushing or pulling (manipulation) this into a straightened position is to force the body into a position and work against the natural protective mechanisms. It does seem that spinal manipulation can ease pain in the short term but does not necessarily offer a better long-term outcome. Consistent movement and positional change is a sensible option.

A study completed some years ago demonstrated that the best predictor of back pain was the ability to hold the back isometrically. With the individual lying face down on a table, his hips at the edge with the trunk being held straight out over the edge, they tested the endurance factor, i.e./ how long they could hold the position. Those with the ability to maintain the position were less likely to experience back pain over the next year.

Core stability encompasses a range of exercises that supposedly create a strong ‘middle’, thereby reducing the risk of back pain. This is based on research that was undertaken in Australia some years ago. Subsequent studies have found that to truly optimise the trunk muscles they need to be working as part of an overall movement strategy controlled by the brain. This requires subtle yet focused training with a strong cognitive element to ensure that the deeper muscles are working at the right level (very low) and with the right timing. This does not mean pulling the low abdomen in as tightly as possible. In fact, many whom I see who have practiced this end up with greater tension and pain as a result.

We simply cannot dissociate lifestyle factors from back pain. Our habits at home, work and during physical activity will have an effect upon the spinal tissues. At this point we have to consider the way in which we feel as stress plays a huge role in pain and how we use our body. The physiology of stress affects every system in the body including the musculoskeletal system where our movements and posturing are manifestations of our thinking. For example, many will tense their shoulders or clench their jaws on becoming stressed. Our thought processes therefore, have an enormous role to play in how we hold ourselves and move. In essence, movement is an expression of what we do and think about. When a pain has persisted for some time, dealing with stressors and emotions must be part of a comprehensive treatment programme. In the acute stage of back pain when fear and anxiety play a role in the protection, having a reassuring explanation is key to starting the process of recovery.

Many people with back pain demonstrate a fear of movement and avoid certain activities. The fear usually develops during the acute episode and is reinforced by further bouts of pain. This is one of the clearest demonstrations of how thinking affects our movement. Interestingly, the amygdala in the brain that deals with fear is connected with the motor centres thereby exerting an effect upon the planning and execution of movement. One of the primary roles of the healthcare professional is to thoroughly assess the patient and fully explain the symptoms and provide a meaning so as to reduce the fear factor and encourage positive engagement in tackling the problem proactively with physical and cognitive measures.

Spinal health in my view cannot be separated from our general health and lifestyle. Considering our physical activity levels, posturing, state of mind, life circumstances, past experiences, our beliefs about pain and injury, culture and the implications of injury are just some of the factors we must think about. No injury or pain happens in isolation. There is always a background to the initiation of pain whether it be acute or gradually building over a period of time. Our job is to look at the individual and their circumstances around the problem in order to find a route forward to recovery and health.

Many sports people will complain of back pain as it is such a common problem. With the right knowledge and strategies over a realistic timeline, the pain can change and we can adapt positively to lead fulfilling and active lives.

08May/12

The hamstring | a common recurring problem

The unfortunate Thiago Motta of Italy suffered what appeared to be a hamstring injury just minutes after coming onto the pitch last night. The Euro 2012 finalists were already under severe pressure from the dominant Spanish team when he was stretchered off the field clutching the back of his thigh. The Brazilian-Italian footballer was expressing his and his nation’s agony as they eventually lost 4-0.

Hamstring injuries are common in football. Often seen as the player pulling up having been sprinting, he clutches the back of his thigh, then hopping or hitting the floor. The amount of pain can vary as in any injury as pain is not an accurate indicator of the amount of actual damage.

The hamstring group is made of three muscles situated on the back of the thigh: biceps femoris on the outside, and semimembranosus and semitendinosis on the inside. They run from the pelvis to the lower leg, bending the knee but also slowing the knee down as it straightens. It is often in this latter phase that the ‘pull’ occurs.

When the muscle is pulled it can be difficult to walk. There can be bruising and swelling in the thigh, although sometimes this is deep in the leg and therefore not immediately visible. With rupture of the muscle fibres, the blood and fluid may track down the leg, causing bruising and swelling to appear lower than the injury.

With an acute injury, ‘PRICE’ is the management strategy of choice where P is protection, R is rest, I is ice, C is compression and E is elevation. In the early stages of an injury and the healing process there is pain, redness, swelling and heat. These are all manifestations of the inflammation that starts healing. Despite the unpleasantness, the signs and symptoms are the body’s responses to injury and are normal. Seeking the advice of a health professional is advisable so that you can fully understand the problem and what you must do to facilitate the most effective recovery.

When we have recovered from the acuteness of a hamstring injury, an individualised training programme must be designed, explained and implemented by a trainer or physiotherapist. This should be followed, progressed and completed to reduce the risk of future problems in the same area. The exercises and drills become increasingly functional, rehearsing the types of movements and skills needed to perform. This routine is practiced so that the player is ready physically and mentally for the demands of the game.

It is not uncommon for a twinge or similar pain to be felt in the back of the thigh sometime after the original injury. Of course there can be a re-injury where actual muscle fibres or tissue can be damaged. However, there can equally be cases whereby it feels like the original injury but there is no actual damage. In this situation, the brain has recognised the pattern of movement, determines a potential threat and responds with a pain in the back of the thigh, more as a warning shot. This means that there is still an underlying sensitivity that may have been felt as a persisting tightness (‘my hamstrings are always tight’, I often hear) or some discomfort with running or sitting with pressure on the muscles. This low level sensitivity and tightness requires a different treatment and training approach. To determine the difference, you should see a physiotherapist or other healthcare professional who can assess your situation and advise you on a specific course of action.

If you have a recurring hamtrsing injury or pain in the back of your thigh that is stopping you return to full play, call us now: T 07518 445493

12Mar/12

Football Injury Blog @Footymatters

Footy Matters

I am really excited to be writing a regular blog on the Footy Matters website looking at injuries in football.

Injury Time with Richmond Stace

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