Category Archives: CRPSUK

04Sep/17
CRPS Conference Cork 2017

Notes from Day 1 CRPS Conference in Cork

Notes from Day 1 CRPS Conference in Cork

CRPS Conference Cork 2017

Welcome to my observations from Day 1 of the CRPS Conference in Cork last week. The notes from Day 2 will be with you shortly, but for now you can check out what went on in the room and beyond. I was there in a dual capacity: representing Understand Pain and keen to make connections with others who want to drive social change with regards pain, and as a trustee for CRPS UK.

‘no pain no gain’ — really??

There are always key moments in a day’s full programme, and there was one that stood out yesterday. More on that shortly.

We started with a walk through of the known predictors for CRPS by Dr. Andreas Goebel. Over the years, Dr. Goebel has become a well known figure in the world of CRPS, so it was good to see him kick off proceedings after an introduction from Dr Dominic Hegarty.

Risk Factors pre-trauma include age over 50 years, being female, suffering migraine, osteoporosis, asthma and taking ACE-inhibitors. Immediately post-trauma we should assess for the pain intensity (more pain, more risk), a lack of exercise, the fracture type, musculoskeletal co-morbidities and perhaps pre-existing PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder).

This is a key area for clinicians and our ability to recognise the likelihood that a person could develop CRPS. In honing the awareness and skills, this can only get better, which would translate into less suffering. Jumping ahead to the last part of the day, CRPS UK launched their new information leaflet that specifically targets the lack of knowledge and understanding.

CRPS UK Leaflet

CRPS UK New Leaflet

The morning rolled on as we were treated to performances from the CRPS pop-stars. A gig typically gets going with the headline act at the end of a day of progressively bigger bands taking the stage. We started with a ‘main event’ as Lorimer Moseley entered the room via a video link.

Lorimer’s urine

Having shown off about his white, urine coloured wine as he described it, Lorimer gave us a typically witty yet informative talk. Always entertaining, LM is equally sharp in his observations from data, thereby keeping a firm foot in science. Admirably, he emphasised one of the often neglected aspects of being human in these situations — bias. Our declarations when speaking set the scene and let the audience know who we are (a bit).

The focus of Lorimer’s excellent work is certainly the brain. He has a way of transmitting the information in such a digestible way that most presenters would pay for a few of his (brain) cells. Together with the ability to make the listener feel on a par, this makes for easy listening whilst looking at some dots on a graph. I would not make head nor tail of those dots, but LM makes it engaging and everyone comes away knowing what they mean as well as an insight into the rigours of doing science well.

If there was a criticism it would be about the focus on the brain rather than the person. However, it is up the the clinicians and therapists to gather the presented information from the different speakers and form a bigger picture. Regular readers will know that my beliefs (and there will be bias in these of course) sit with the whole person approach, which is why Tim’s (Beames) talk softened the blow of data by bringing the human element to the room.

Tim and I have emerged from a similar place and whilst we will have our unique take, our interests lie in the person and that person learning to reduce their suffering. We both know that people can do this with the right ‘know-how’.

“The whole person approach is a must”

GMI (graded motor imagery) has been a big mover in CRPS. Tim was keen to point out that this is not a method to use in isolation, which I am sure everyone would agree with. In the physio world, over the years, there has often been the search for the recipe, the one treatment mode that will help. Littered with ‘gurus’, physio education has suffered as a result. I think and hope we are moving beyond this now. Integrated education when we share platforms with different disciples must be a way forward. Certainly in the Pain Coach Programme I want a range of clinicians and therapists so that we can create super teams with a shared vision, a focus on our strengths and each person knowing why they do what they do as a minimum.

Shock of the day goes to Robert Van Dongen as he described an approach whereby the person with CRPS receives hands on manual therapy that looks agonising. I say ‘looks’ because he treated us to a video of a foot and ankle being massaged and moved with audio. The noises coming from the recipient suggest it was not pleasant. The folk on my table who have CRPS winced and looked away, I felt something in my foot. It was provocative viewing! But, this is what is happening so we should discuss the treatment philosophy and work out whether it does have any long-term benefits. I am not sure. I will not be adopting this mode readers may like to know.

“Watching someone have a painful experience triggers real emotions and sensations in me”

The patients receiving the therapy were clearly motivated to undertake the programme. The short term pain of the treatment out-weighed the ‘pain’ of trying something else. There was a reward somewhere — maybe the relief of the heightened pain easing off! A key point here with a motivated patient is that they are likely to do well with any functional programme because they have prioritised and committed to taking actions in line with getting better. Would these people do equally well with a standard programme?

The shock wore off and we settled into a solid and well thought out talk on the team approach from Candy McCabe. I am into ‘teams’ and in particular ‘super teams’ so I was very pleased to hear Candy speak about some of the important principles. Great teams do great work but this necessitates a good leader, a vision, a recognition of individual and team strengths, engagement, and compassionate communication at the very least.

Bring a touch of the real world to the end of the day, we heard from two clinicians who described their experiences. Together with Victoria from Burning Nights, these stories brought the day to a conclusion as we moved from data, science and theory to what actually happens and the phenomenon of the lived experience. At the end of the day, it is this lived experience that is important. A person suffering CRPS, do they need to know about chemicals, brains, nerves etc, or do they need to know that they can be ok and that they can get better? For me that’s a no-brainer.

Whilst I agree that people must understand their pain (of course I do!), this is a practical knowing. The Understand Pain & Pain Coach Workshops deliver the knowledge, skills and know how, with the last element a vital part of the make-up. Without know-how, we don’t know. Not knowing results in fear, worry, and a hit and miss approach versus a knowing that leads to confidence, control and an outlook of being well.

Through the day there was acknowledgement that this is a difficult condition to treat and address for the person and clinicians. Traditionally thinking, yes this is true. But as with anything, if we start by saying how hard it will be, we are pre-empting. We are creating a lens of ‘difficultness’ through which we push everything else.

There is a choice to be had. What would happen if we used the lens of possibility and opportunity? We are designed to change and have inherent mechanisms of getting better. The offerings of a whole person approach tap into our potential as amazing human beings as opposed to focusing on a body area, a brain, a particular treatment approach. The reality is that we are all unique (see blog here on WUPs) and hence there is no single way of dealing with a condition. And that is because we are not dealing with a condition, we are helping a human being overcome a challenge and how that manifests in them. The plea here then, is to stop trying to fit a round peg into a square hole. See things for what they are and address each person in the ‘personalised’ way that they need and deserve. I will write more on the ‘how’ of this subsequently.

So, with that all in mind, we move onwards into day 2……

22Jun/17
CRPS UK

Delighted to be a trustee for CRPS UK

delighted to be a trustee for CRPS UK

CRPS UK ~ a charity supporting people suffering Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) and their carers

I am delighted to be a trustee for CRPS UK. In recent years I have spoken at the conferences and this year was invited to run the 2017 London Marathon for the charity.

CRPS is an example of a condition that can be excruciatingly painful. The Budapest Criteria lays out the necessary signs and symptoms, which is important in terms of a diagnosis and for research.

There are several issues that need urgent addressing and I will help CRPS with their endeavours.

As with other painful conditions, the first problem lies with the misunderstanding of pain. The predominant model remains biomedical, however this approach does not offer answers for persistent or chronic pain. The biomedical model relies on finding a pathology or structural basis to explain the pain. Pain is poorly related to tissue state because it is part of the way that the body protects itself. We have known this for many years, the famous lecture and paper being published in 1979.

“society does not understand pain despite it being the largest global health burden

Early diagnosis is important for CRPS as it guides treatment and prevents unnecessary suffering. This means that CRPS needs to be recognised by healthcare professionals. A common scenario is an incident resulting in the development of the condition, which is not recognised, thereby treated inefficiently, the symptoms worsen and so the cycle goes on. An important note is that poor treatment outcomes and low expectations affect the outcomes. However, the third point is that pain can and does change.

The predominant messages in society (and healthcare) are negative and suggest that the person has to merely cope or manage their pain. With the bar set so low and teeing up the person’s expectations at such a meagre height, no wonder there is minimal improvement. Why would you bother? This is all wrong and certainly not in line with what we really know about pain and people.

We have remarkable potential and need to know how to tap into it. What is getting in the way of recovery and getting better? What are the barriers to living? In exploring these by using our own amazing resources, we can achieve success and change. We are designed to change; you cannot not change! It is a matter of choosing a direction.

“what do you want in life? How does it look?

My Pain Coach Programme stemmed from understanding and believing in people’s ability to change, their resourcefulness (that they may not know they have because of negative messages to self and from others) and the latest pain sciences.

delighted to be a trustee for CRPS UK

Richmond Stace

Who am I?

For those who don’t know me and who are wondering why I have been asked to be a trustee for CRPS UK, here is a brief background. I am a physiotherapist with a background in pain neuroscience, rehabilitation and nursing. For many years I have worked with people suffering chronic and complex pain, giving them the understanding of pain that they can use to get better. In 2015 together with Georgie Standage, who came to see me with CRPS, we created UP | understand pain. Starting as an awareness campaign, UP was launched with a huge singing event.

delighted to be a trustee for CRPS UK

UP is now focusing on delivering the right messages about pain via the new website due to be available as a resource this year, and workshops for people who need to understand pain: sufferers, their families, clinicians, policymakers, patient representative group and other stakeholders.

I am very excited to be working with the team at CRPS UK, driving forward to change the way that the condition is recognised and treated. At the outset, people need to understand pain and know their role in getting better and their potential. Setting the scene from the beginning is vital and then using the right approaches so that the person can overcome their pain and live a meaningful life.

RS

 

 

04Apr/17
UP & CRPS UK London Marathon

Not long now

Not long now ~ with only a few weeks away before the London Marathon, I must admit that I am getting rather excited. It has been very worthwhile putting in all the miles with the aim of really enjoying the day.



One more long run to do this weekend and then I will be tailing off as advised by my team of trainers and co-runners. Yesterday a friend asked me about these 20+ milers and how you keep going. I never imagined that I would ever be running for 3-4 hours, and certainly never thought I would be popping out for a ‘quick 10 miles’. I have found that the time passes quickly once I get going but really focusing on what is going on around me, looking up, coaching myself to remain relaxed and feel inspired by the encouragement I receive.

Anyhow, the really important bit is raising money and awareness of two key projects tackling the number one global health burden: pain. The charity CRPS UK and the social enterprise UP | understand pain both envision a world of people understanding their own potential to live well and to overcome their pain.

THE PROBLEM OF PAIN

The costs of chronic pain to individuals and society are vast. Loss of earnings, loss of productivity, the expense of treatments that often don’t work and above all the immense suffering. This need not be the case if society really understood pain. By understanding pain, individuals would know where to put their efforts to get better from the outset of a pain problem, whatever the cause, and healthcare would deliver effective care.

The thinking on pain still largely resides in out-dated models. This means that individuals become reliant upon passive treatments, are subjected to endless unnecessary investigations and are exposed to the wrong messages about pain that keep expectations low and purport fears and worries that only increase suffering.

“Pain is poorly related to injury, tissue health, structures in the body, biomechanics or pathology

Our journey to understand pain began when two remarkable men created pain medicine. Pat Wall and Ron Melzack changed the landscape forever and have inspired a generation of scientists and clinicians to ask questions about pain and discover the answers: what is pain? What is pain for? What can we do about pain?

Our knowledge about pain has increased enormously but there is a long way to go before our current understanding is practiced day to day in society. This gap is a significant societal issue, and one that UP will bridge with the forthcoming education programmes and an online resource that is this very website. The UP site will be re-launched this year, packed with information that people can use to understand pain.

WE HAVE AMAZING POTENTIAL

Humans are incredible. We are designed to change, adapt and learn, so tapping into our natural resources is one of the most potent and enabling things we can do. Consider all the achievements of mankind, which largely boil down to a clear picture of success, an ability to focus upon a plan of action, taking action and learning along the way when facing challenges. Together with a dose of determination, courage and belief, we can achieve by always being the best that we can be: ‘I will be the best me today’ is not a bad mantra to have!

The challenge of pain is no different. The programmes that UP will run for people in pain and for clinicians are all based on how we can be successful, how we can chose the positive route, how we can achieve our best. This is by focusing on what we do well, how we do it and how we can do more of this whilst acknowledging and seeking to improve in other areas.

So this in my mind drives my desire to do my best in training and on the day on 23rd April. Having said that, I will be pleased to see some familiar faces in the crowd on the way round! Or even faces I don’t know who want to support our causes. Pain affects so many people across the globe for so many reasons. Together we can change this by changing the way society thinks about pain and our expectations. Let’s expect to do well and live well.

Please support us here by donating whatever you can and join us for a quiz night before the run on Thursday 20th April in Surbiton — see here.

Thanks!!

18Feb/17

Why am I running the London Marathon?

Why am I running the London Marathon?

We are 10 weeks away from the London Marathon and I am getting excited about the day. The training is going well, and I am using others experience and knowledge as a yardstick, reaching 16 miles so far. A bit more nudging in March and I’ll be set to join the thousands of other runners, coursing round the great city of London.

So why am I doing this? The answer is simple. To raise awareness and money to address the biggest global health burden, chronic pain. It costs us the most economically but of course the amount of suffering worldwide is immeasurable. This must change and we can change it by shifting our thinking to be in line with what we know about pain. With an understanding of pain, individuals realise their potential to overcome their pain and live meaningful lives. This is achievable, and in this day and age we have the means to reach across the globe to give people the knowledge and skills. This is the story of UP | understand pain, which was co-founded by myself and Georgie as a pain awareness campaign. Now we have big plans to take the project to another level to achieve our aim of changing the way society thinks about pain.

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) can be a terribly disabling condition, characterised by intense pain. Many people have not heard of CRPS and within healthcare diagnosis is often delayed. This is a problem because like most conditions, early identification allows for treatment to begin. The treatment must be based upon the person’s understanding of the signs and symptoms, for there is an understandable fear that drives on-going protection. Therefore, as with any injury or pain problem, the early messages must be right and make sense.A person’s belief drives their behaviours and subsequent thinking, so a good working knowledge of pain is vital ~ understand pain to change pain.

CRPS UK gained a place in this year’s London Marathon, and having spoken twice at their conferences and being in regular contact, I ‘volunteered’ to be the runner. I was very excited to be chosen and gratefully accepted, which is now why I am out in the Lycra every other day (I will not be posting a picture of that!). CRPS UK is a charity dedicated to advancing the understanding of the condition and supporting people with CRPS. The people involved are doing incredible work to raise the profile and have achieved so much through their dedication. Please visit their website here.

You may be someone suffering chronic pain or know someone who is regularly in pain. Most of us do know someone and can see the effects upon their life. This is not just pain from backs and joints but pain related to cancer, heart disease, arthritis, irritable bowel syndrome, headaches, migraines, rheumatological diseases, pelvic pain and many other conditions that hurt. The work being done by CRPS UK and UP aims to change this and provide resources and training that gives individuals and society a way forward, to overcome pain and live well.

Please show your support here and donate generously

Thankyou!!

30Jan/17

CRPS Diagnosis

CRPS Diagnosis

CRPSComplex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a collection of signs and symptoms that define this particular condition. A syndrome according to the Oxford Dictionaries, is a ‘group of symptoms which consistently occur together, or a condition characterized by a set of associated symptoms’. Therefore, we can clump together any set of symptoms and give it a name, which is really what has happened over the years in medicine. The important point is that when we use the term, we should all know what we are talking about and know what we should look for to make a diagnosis. In other words, a set of guidelines.

The Budapest Criteria delivers guidelines for CRPS, which you can read about in this paper by Harden et al. (2013). The clinical criteria (see below) acknowledge the sensory, vasomotor, sudomotor/oedema and motor/trophic categories that really highlight the complexity of CRPS. Pain is often the primary concern, with people describing their incredible suffering in a range of graphic ways. However, it is not just the pain that causes suffering but the way in which the life of the person changes together with their sense of who they are and their sense of agency seemingly lost. One of the roles of the clinician is certainly to help restore that sense of who I am, a construct that is built from many of life’s ‘components’.

Budapest Criteria

1. Continuing pain, which is disproportionate to any inciting event

2. Must report at least one symptom in three of the four following categories

  • Sensory: Reports of hyperalgesia and/or allodynia
  • Vasomotor: Reports of temperature asymmetry and/or skin color changes and/or skin color asymmetry
  • Sudomotor/Edema: Reports of edema and/or sweating changes and/or sweating asymmetry
  • Motor/Trophic: Reports of decreased range of motion and/or motor dysfunction (weakness, tremor, dystonia) and/or trophic changes (hair, nail, skin)

3. Must display at least one sign at time of evaluation in two or more of the following categories

  • Sensory: Evidence of hyperalgesia (to pinprick) and/or allodynia (to light touch and/or deep somatic pressure and/or joint movement)
  • Vasomotor: Evidence of temperature asymmetry and/or skin color changes and/or asymmetry
  • Sudomotor/Edema: Evidence of edema and/or sweating changes and/or sweating asymmetry
  • Motor/Trophic: Evidence of decreased range of motion and/or motor dysfunction (weakness, tremor, dystonia) and/or trophic changes (hair, nail, skin)

4. There is no other diagnosis that better explains the signs and symptoms

Importance of diagnosis

A diagnosis made in the same way, based on the same criteria means that clinicians, researchers and patients alike are all discussing the same condition. This may seem pedantic but in fact it is vital for creating a way forward. Clinicians mus know what they are treating, patients must know what they are being treated for and researchers must know what they are researching. Sounds obvious but let’s not take it for granted. So the Budapest Criteria has pointed all those with an interest in the same direction. Consequently we can focus on creating better and better treatments.

As with any painful condition, the start point must be understanding the pain itself. The following questions arise that we must be try to answer:

  • why am I in pain?
  • why this much pain?
  • why is it persisting?
  • what influences my pain?
  • what do I, the bearer of the pain, need to do to get better?
  • what will you do, the clinician or therapist, to help me get better?
  • how long will it take?

New thinking, new science, new models of pain over the past 10 years has advanced our knowledge enormously. Understanding how we change, how our body systems update, how we can make choices as individuals, and the practices we can use to change our pain experience to name but a few, create great hope as we tap into our amazing strengths and resources as human beings. Detailing the treatment approaches is for another series of blogs, but here the key point is that the first step in overcoming pain is to understand it. It is the misunderstanding of pain that causes erroneous thinking and action, which we can and must address across society — pain is a public health issue. Chronic pain is one of the largest global health burdens (Vos et al. 2012). It costs us the most alongside depression, and I believe that this need not be the case if and when we change how we think about pain, based on current and emerging knowledge.

“The first step to overcoming pain is to understand it”

upandrunThis is the reason for UP | understand pain, which we started in 2015 with the aim of changing the way people think and then approach their pain, realising their potential and knowing what they can do. We are about to launch the new website that is packed with practical information for the globe to access online. Alongside this we have plans to create a social enterprise that will purport the same messages, coming from the great thinkers and clinicians who are shaping a new era in changing pain.

In April I will be running the London Marathon to raise awareness of the work of both UP and CRPS UK. You can support the work that both are doing to change pain by donating here

Thank you!

 

19Nov/15

CRPS UK 2015

CRPS UK Conference 20154 years ago I came down to Bath to speak at the CRPS UK conference and so I was delighted to be asked to return and talk today. To take listeners beyond the theory, I asked Georgie and Jo to join me as a triple act, to illustrate and to enliven what I was saying by describing their lived experiences. Chatting to people afterwards, it appears that this gave an insight into the potential that everyone has for changing in a positive and constructive way; a way that is meaningful for them.

UP | understand painFor those who could not be there and for those who are there who would like a summary of my key points, this blog is for you.

The talk was entitled ‘Understand pain to change pain’, the message being that by understanding your pain, you think and act in such a way that you can go about overcoming your pain.

Establishing how we think about our pain is a key start point — how do you think about your pain? Why do you think it hurts? Why do you have persisting symptoms? These are some of the questions that need answering in order to move forward. Pain is a protective response to a perceived threat, and it is the person who does the ‘perceiving’ as well as embodying the experience of pain. We are the producer and the experiencer of our pain that is felt in the body, in a location that is deemed needy of protection in that moment. For reasons to be fully understood, our bodies can become very, very good at this response, and create many habits of thought and action that influence the likelihood of pain. Remember though, pain is a response to a perceived threat, so changing one’s perception begins to change the pain experience; reduce the threat, reduce the pain. Some may wonder why then, do they still feel pain despite having eradicated fear of the pain and other conscious threats? This is because there are many, many subconscious cues in the environment, in what we think and do, that can be perceived as being threatening. Whilst we cannot account for each and every variable, and how these change in combination with other variables, we can alter the perceived threat of the most obvious ones: movements, places, people, thoughts.

CRPSIt is the person who feels pain, not the body part. I may experience pain in my knee but it is not my knee that is in pain, I am. This may sound strange initially, but think about it for a minute. Who is thirsty? You or your mouth? Who is hungry? You or your stomach? Who is in pain? Your or your knee? Therefore, who needs treatment, training, coaching etc? You do, the person who feels pain and lives the pain. Any treatment programme must address the whole person and their lived life — this is them and their life in which the pain is embedded. It also has to make sense, engaging the person so that they continue to create the conditions for change.

To overcome pain we must firstly understand pain, much like a farmer would plough his field before sowing seeds–a vital start point. Having a working knowledge of your pain allows you to engage with your programme, focus on your vision of how you want your life to be and how you are going to get there whilst dealing with distractions. Distractions usually come in the form of negative thoughts, which deflate, demotivate and actually intensify pain responses by increasing the threat value. Understanding pain also helps to reduce and eradicate fear that also impacts on how you experience your pain. Fearful thoughts and avoidance both contribute to on-going pain and hence are necessarily addressed.

UP | understand painThere are many strategies, techniques and exercises that can be used, but for these to work, our thinking needs to be straight and based on a working knowledge. This is useable knowledge that can be considered at any given moment to ensure that the inner dialogue is based on truth and not on fearful opinion–think about what you tell yourself every day; what do you convince yourself? The Pain Coach Programme over-arches the specific strategies employed. The Pain Coach delivers the knowledge and skills to the person so that they become their own coach at any give moment, deciding on the best and healthiest course of action; towards the vision. A blend of the latest thinking in pain science with strengths-based coaching gives the person everything that they need to overcome their pain. What does overcoming pain mean? It means that you live your life in a meaningful way according to you, and that there are always opportunities to grow and develop.

UP | understand painI ran through some of the strategies that I use within the Pain Coach Programme including UBER-M, which is one that I give to people so that they may choose the wise and healthy option, taking them towards their goals; this as opposed to being distracted by negative (embodied) thoughts and unhealthy actions.

  • U–understand: a working knowledge of my problem; what do I know? what do I do now? This is about clarity, not fear
  • B–breathe: mindful practice and breathing to cultivate awareness of the bodily aspects of the pain experience and how thoughts manifest in the body, and then what you can do to change these habits
  • E–exercise: specific sensorimotor training and general activity
  • R–re-charge: we need enough energy to engage with life!
  • M–movement: to nourish the tissues and the body maps in the brain to have a sense of normal

Normal = no threat; no threat = no pain

Pain is all about perceived threat. Reduce the threat consciously by understanding and knowing what to do (that’s the easy bit!), and then go about reducing the perceived threat that occurs via habits and subconscious processing. This includes environmental cues, contextual cues and habits of thought; the so-called ‘autopilot’. Persisting pain is characterised by many habits, automatically learned responses and attentional biases. These must be addressed by constructing a programme that works with the person, not just their painful body part –> it is the person who is in pain, not their foot, arm, back etc. My back, to use an example, cannot feel pain. I feel pain. I experience pain, and I experience my pain in my back. There is an enormous difference in the underlying thinking and hence the approach. The whole person approach is vital for pain and any other condition having said that! If healthcare at large adopted this way of thinking, we would be far more successful with persisting conditions; this to the point where the suffering lessens and lessens. Reducing the impact results in a meaningful life, and this is achievable for all by developing understanding and then choosing wise actions.

My emphasis throughout the talk was on understanding pain to change pain. How can just understanding pain change pain, you may ask? Put simply, by understanding pain you are changing the way that you think about it, the meaning that you give to it and what you then do about it. If you do not understand your pain, like any problem, you cannot solve it, and the erroneous thoughts that one has can lead down a route of perpetuating fear, avoidance, beliefs that pain will not change. This route is one of on-going suffering. Understanding pain creates the way forward to overcoming pain; overcoming pain being the return to a meaningful life as defined by the person. When you know what you are dealing with and how to deal with it in any given moment, then you are creating the conditions for healthy change. This is the essence of Pain Coach, creating those conditions as often as possible, becoming aware of certain habits, learned behaviours and associations, compassionately correcting and moving onward with a selection of strategies. This is about getting back to life by living that life. Keeping that in the forefront of your thoughts, and letting go of distractions leads you towards your success. Let us be positive with good reason, because we are always changing, and with positive strategies.

For more information or to book an appointment, please call 07518 445493 or email [email protected]

01Jul/13

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome | Diagnosis using the Budapest Criteria

The Budapest Criteria should now be used to diagnose Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS):

A: The patient has continuing pain which is disproportionate to the inciting event

B: The patient has at least one sign in two or more of the categories

C: The patient reports at least one symptom in three or more of the categories

D: No other diagnosis can better explain the signs and symptoms

Sensory: Allodynia (to light touch and/or temperature sensation and/or deep somatic pressure and/or joint movement) and/or hyperalgesia (to pinprick)

Vasomotor: Temperature asymmetry (more than 1 deg.) and/or skin colour changes and/or skin colour asymmetry

Sudomotor/oedema: Oedema and/or sweating changes and/or sweating asymmetry

Motor/trophic: Decreased range of motion and/or motor dysfunction (weakness, tremor, dystonia) and/or trophic changes (hair/nail/skin)

Signs – see or feel a problem

Symptoms – patient reports a problem

Click here for The CRPS Concise Guide on the Royal College of Physicians website

If you have been diagnosed or think that you may have CRPS, contact us for information or to book an appointment to start your specialist treatment and training programme; call 07932 689081

CRPS UK Blog for the latest research and thinking in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome