Category Archives: CRPS treatment

27Mar/17

Charity quiz night

Charity Quiz Night

On Thursday 20th April we are having a charity quiz night at Wags N Tails in Surbiton to raise money for CRPS UK and UP | understand painclick here for the event link — please come along and support us! 

Richmond is running the London Marathon this year to support CRPS UK and UP — please donate here

Chronic pain is the number one global health burden

Chronic pain costs us the most of all the health problems that exist. One only has to think of all the conditions that are painful and consider the expenditure on investigations and treatment. This is in addition to the loss of productivity. Some 20% of the population suffers chronic pain, including 1:5 children, which begins to provide insight into the immeasurable suffering. People from all corners of society are struggling to understand why they are in pain, do not know what they can do and feel isolated as their plight continues. This does not need to be the case.

UP | understand pain

At UP, we have a vision of a world where people understand pain and know what they can do to live well. This begins with changing the way society thinks about pain, truly understanding the facts, in which case they would know that there is a way forward. We are constantly changing and learning meaning that we have the resources and the potential to get better. People need to know how.

UP is to be re-launched this year as a social enterprise that will deliver the latest knowledge about pain and how it can be applied. The know-how is vital as are the skills of well-being and self-coaching. The programmes will be delivered to people suffering pain and to healthcare professionals who work with people in pain. This includes trainees who are the new generation of clinicians and therapists. We also plan to take our message to the policy makers to create changes ‘top down’.

CRPS UK

The CRPS UK charity supports people who have been diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS — sometimes called RSD) and their families. The most recent diagnostic guide is the Budapest Criteria.

CRPS is poorly recognised and understood. This means that diagnosis and the right treatment can be delayed, resulting in on-going suffering. The pain of CRPS can be unimaginable with the impact upon the person’s life being enormous.

We can and must do better with CRPS and all pain conditions. The right messages early on and the right actions taken by both the individual and clinicians will make a huge difference.

The work being done by both CRPS UK and UP will be instrumental in the forthcoming changes that must happen in society. Pain is a public health issue of the utmost importance — the costs and the suffering. Pain must be addressed in this way, which is what we are doing at UP. This massive problem affects us all and we can do so much to transform the issue.

Please support our work by coming to the charity quiz on Thursday 20th April or donate here.

 

08Feb/16

CRPS Research

CRPSKeep up to date with some of the recent CRPS research papers. You can click on the title link for the full text version. My comments are posted ‘RS’ in italics.

Pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) compared to conventional treatment in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: a randomised controlled trial

abstract

To compare the effectiveness of pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) with conventional treatment in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) in a randomised controlled trial with a blinded assessor.

The study was conducted at a level 1 trauma centre in the Netherlands.

56 adult patients with CRPS-1 participated. Three patients were lost to follow-up

Patients received either PEPT in a maximum of five treatment sessions, or conventional treatment following the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline.

Outcomes were assessed at baseline and at 3, 6 and 9 months after randomisation. The primary outcome measure was the Impairment level Sum Score—Restricted Version (ISS-RV), consisting of visual analogue scale for pain (VAS-pain), McGill Pain Questionnaire, active range of motion (AROM) and skin temperature. Secondary outcome measures included Pain Disability Index (PDI); muscle strength; Short Form 36 (SF-36); disability of arm, shoulder and hand; Lower Limb Tasks Questionnaire (LLTQ); 10 m walk test; timed up-and-go test (TUG) and EuroQol-5D.

The intention-to-treat analysis showed a clinically relevant decrease in ISS-RV (6.7 points for PEPT and 6.2 points for conventional treatment), but the between-group difference was not significant (0.96, 95% CI −1.56 to 3.48). Participants allocated to PEPT experienced a greater improvement in AROM (between-group difference 0.51, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.94; p=0.02). The per protocol analysis showed larger and significant between-group effects on ISS-RV, VAS-pain, AROM, PDI, SF-36, LLTQ and TUG.

We cannot conclude that PEPT is superior to conventional treatment for patients with CRPS-1. Further high-quality research on the effects of PEPT is warranted given the potential effects as indicated by the per protocol analysis.

***

High-frequency repetitive sensory stimulation as intervention to improve sensory loss in patients with CRPS type 1

abstract

Achieving perceptual gains in healthy individuals or facilitating rehabilitation in patients is generally considered to require intense training to engage neuronal plasticity mechanisms. Recent work, however, suggested that beneficial outcome similar to training can be effectively acquired by a complementary approach in which the learning occurs in response to mere exposure to repetitive sensory stimulation (rSS). For example, high-frequency repetitive sensory stimulation (HF-rSS) enhances tactile performance and induces cortical reorganization in healthy subjects and patients after stroke. Patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) show impaired tactile performance associated with shrinkage of cortical maps. We here investigated the feasibility and efficacy of HF-rSS, and low-frequency rSS (LF-rSS) to enhance tactile performance and reduce pain intensity in 20 patients with CRPS type I. Intermittent high- or low-frequency electrical stimuli were applied for 45 min/day to all fingertips of the affected hand for 5 days. Main outcome measures were spatial two-point-discrimination thresholds and mechanical detection thresholds measured on the tip of the index finger bilaterally. Secondary endpoint was current pain intensity. All measures were assessed before and on day 5 after the last stimulation session. HF-rSS applied in 16 patients improved tactile discrimination on the affected hand significantly without changes contralaterally. Current pain intensity remained unchanged on average, but decreased in four patients by ≥30%. This limited pain relief might be due to the short stimulation period of 5 days only. In contrast, after LF-rSS, tactile discrimination was impaired in all four patients, while detection thresholds and pain were not affected. Our data suggest that HF-rSS could be used as a novel approach in CRPS treatment to improve sensory loss. Longer treatment periods might be required to induce consistent pain relief.

RS: This is an interesting finding. Stimulation that brings about changes in the cortical maps is not a new notion, and indeed is part of normal learning. We stimulate with movement and/or touch under day to day circumstances, and in fact that is what we need to employ moment to moment at home to overcome CRPS and other painful conditions. Most people will not have access to equipment but are able to use simple touch, two point discrimination and movement, all of which form a vital part of the training and self-coaching programme. Pain is a lived experience and the programme must become part of life and hence be as simple as possible, which it can.

***

Motor imagery and its effect on complex regional pain syndrome: an integrative review

abstract

The motor imagery (MI) has been proposed as a treatment in the complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1), since it seems to promote a brain reorganization effect on sensory-motor areas of pain perception. The aim of this paper is to investigate, through an integrative critical review, the influence of MI on the CRPS-1, correlating their evidence to clinical practice. Research in PEDro, Medline, Bireme and Google Scholar databases was conducted. Nine randomized controlled trials (level 2), 1 non-controlled clinical study (level 3), 1 case study (level 4), 1 systematic review (level 1), 2 review articles and 1 comment (level 5) were found. We can conclude that MI has shown effect in reducing pain and functionality that remains after 6 months of treatment. However, the difference between the MI strategies for CRPS-1 is unknown as well as the intensity of mental stress influences the painful response or effect of MI or other peripheral neuropathies.

RS: motor imagery does have an impact on our ability to move, and often rapidly so after a few repetitions. Using imagery and visualisation to assess mental representations, body sense and integrity alongside other simple tests gives an insight into the different hierarchical levels of contribution to the brain’s best guess about this moment for the individual. What we are experiencing now is our brain’s prediction (or best guess) when it has chosen from a number of hypotheses. Using imagery and visualisation, we can impact on the predictions as well as our own expecations that feed such predictions and our own conscious sense of what is to come. Pain is worse when we expect something to hurt, so what if we do not expect this and indeed anticipate something different, new and healthy?

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Fear and reward circuit alterations in padeiatric CRPS

abstract

In chronic pain, a number of brain regions involved in emotion (e.g., amygdala, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, insula, anterior cingulate, and prefrontal cortex) show significant functional and morphometric changes. One phenotypic manifestation of these changes is pain-related fear (PRF). PRF is associated with profoundly altered behavioral adaptations to chronic pain. For example, patients with a neuropathic pain condition known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) often avoid use of and may even neglect the affected body area(s), thus maintaining and likely enhancing PRF. These changes form part of an overall maladaptation to chronic pain. To examine fear-related brain circuit alterations in humans, 20 pediatric patients with CRPS and 20 sex- and age-matched healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in response to a well-established fearful faces paradigm. Despite no significant differences on self-reported emotional valence and arousal between the two groups, CRPS patients displayed a diminished response to fearful faces in regions associated with emotional processing compared to healthy controls. Additionally, increased PRF levels were associated with decreased activity in a number of brain regions including the right amygdala, insula, putamen, and caudate. Blunted activation in patients suggests that (a) individuals with chronic pain may have deficits in cognitive-affective brain circuits that may represent an underlying vulnerability or consequence to the chronic pain state; and (b) fear of pain may contribute and/or maintain these brain alterations. Our results shed new light on altered affective circuits in patients with chronic pain and identify PRF as a potentially important treatment target.

Pain Coach ProgrammeRS: we know that fear provokes on-going and more protection as we are perceiving a threat. Pain is also about perceived threat that is being predicted by our brain’s best guess about a particular situation or context base on what has happened before. This is one of the reasons why pain can be so specifically associated with a particular movement, a place or a thought. Many are puzzled by the changeable nature of pain and how it can exists one minute and not the next. Understanding pain allows people to realise that this is exactly the lived experience, especially in youngsters who can appear to be moving normally and then be in agony. Their brains have predicted a need for protection and hence they are in pain. The perceived threat passes and the new prediction is ‘no threat’ and hence no pain. This is how it works and unfortunately many people are not believed as a consequence and a really important reason why society needs to understand pain. Fear of pain being eradicated results in positive change and is a key step towards overcoming pain, starting with a working knowledge. I use UBER-M as a self-coaching tool that I give to individuals: U (understand pain; working knowledge), B (breathing & mindfulness), E (exercises – specific and general), R (re-charge energy to engage); M (movement for health and expression); the question to ask is this: ‘Are these thoughts and actions taking me towards my vision of a healthy me?’

Pain Coach Programme to overcome CRPS and chronic pain | t. 07518 445493

UP | understand painUP | Understand Pain — join us on Twitter @upandsing

 

19Nov/15

CRPS UK 2015

CRPS UK Conference 20154 years ago I came down to Bath to speak at the CRPS UK conference and so I was delighted to be asked to return and talk today. To take listeners beyond the theory, I asked Georgie and Jo to join me as a triple act, to illustrate and to enliven what I was saying by describing their lived experiences. Chatting to people afterwards, it appears that this gave an insight into the potential that everyone has for changing in a positive and constructive way; a way that is meaningful for them.

UP | understand painFor those who could not be there and for those who are there who would like a summary of my key points, this blog is for you.

The talk was entitled ‘Understand pain to change pain’, the message being that by understanding your pain, you think and act in such a way that you can go about overcoming your pain.

Establishing how we think about our pain is a key start point — how do you think about your pain? Why do you think it hurts? Why do you have persisting symptoms? These are some of the questions that need answering in order to move forward. Pain is a protective response to a perceived threat, and it is the person who does the ‘perceiving’ as well as embodying the experience of pain. We are the producer and the experiencer of our pain that is felt in the body, in a location that is deemed needy of protection in that moment. For reasons to be fully understood, our bodies can become very, very good at this response, and create many habits of thought and action that influence the likelihood of pain. Remember though, pain is a response to a perceived threat, so changing one’s perception begins to change the pain experience; reduce the threat, reduce the pain. Some may wonder why then, do they still feel pain despite having eradicated fear of the pain and other conscious threats? This is because there are many, many subconscious cues in the environment, in what we think and do, that can be perceived as being threatening. Whilst we cannot account for each and every variable, and how these change in combination with other variables, we can alter the perceived threat of the most obvious ones: movements, places, people, thoughts.

CRPSIt is the person who feels pain, not the body part. I may experience pain in my knee but it is not my knee that is in pain, I am. This may sound strange initially, but think about it for a minute. Who is thirsty? You or your mouth? Who is hungry? You or your stomach? Who is in pain? Your or your knee? Therefore, who needs treatment, training, coaching etc? You do, the person who feels pain and lives the pain. Any treatment programme must address the whole person and their lived life — this is them and their life in which the pain is embedded. It also has to make sense, engaging the person so that they continue to create the conditions for change.

To overcome pain we must firstly understand pain, much like a farmer would plough his field before sowing seeds–a vital start point. Having a working knowledge of your pain allows you to engage with your programme, focus on your vision of how you want your life to be and how you are going to get there whilst dealing with distractions. Distractions usually come in the form of negative thoughts, which deflate, demotivate and actually intensify pain responses by increasing the threat value. Understanding pain also helps to reduce and eradicate fear that also impacts on how you experience your pain. Fearful thoughts and avoidance both contribute to on-going pain and hence are necessarily addressed.

UP | understand painThere are many strategies, techniques and exercises that can be used, but for these to work, our thinking needs to be straight and based on a working knowledge. This is useable knowledge that can be considered at any given moment to ensure that the inner dialogue is based on truth and not on fearful opinion–think about what you tell yourself every day; what do you convince yourself? The Pain Coach Programme over-arches the specific strategies employed. The Pain Coach delivers the knowledge and skills to the person so that they become their own coach at any give moment, deciding on the best and healthiest course of action; towards the vision. A blend of the latest thinking in pain science with strengths-based coaching gives the person everything that they need to overcome their pain. What does overcoming pain mean? It means that you live your life in a meaningful way according to you, and that there are always opportunities to grow and develop.

UP | understand painI ran through some of the strategies that I use within the Pain Coach Programme including UBER-M, which is one that I give to people so that they may choose the wise and healthy option, taking them towards their goals; this as opposed to being distracted by negative (embodied) thoughts and unhealthy actions.

  • U–understand: a working knowledge of my problem; what do I know? what do I do now? This is about clarity, not fear
  • B–breathe: mindful practice and breathing to cultivate awareness of the bodily aspects of the pain experience and how thoughts manifest in the body, and then what you can do to change these habits
  • E–exercise: specific sensorimotor training and general activity
  • R–re-charge: we need enough energy to engage with life!
  • M–movement: to nourish the tissues and the body maps in the brain to have a sense of normal

Normal = no threat; no threat = no pain

Pain is all about perceived threat. Reduce the threat consciously by understanding and knowing what to do (that’s the easy bit!), and then go about reducing the perceived threat that occurs via habits and subconscious processing. This includes environmental cues, contextual cues and habits of thought; the so-called ‘autopilot’. Persisting pain is characterised by many habits, automatically learned responses and attentional biases. These must be addressed by constructing a programme that works with the person, not just their painful body part –> it is the person who is in pain, not their foot, arm, back etc. My back, to use an example, cannot feel pain. I feel pain. I experience pain, and I experience my pain in my back. There is an enormous difference in the underlying thinking and hence the approach. The whole person approach is vital for pain and any other condition having said that! If healthcare at large adopted this way of thinking, we would be far more successful with persisting conditions; this to the point where the suffering lessens and lessens. Reducing the impact results in a meaningful life, and this is achievable for all by developing understanding and then choosing wise actions.

My emphasis throughout the talk was on understanding pain to change pain. How can just understanding pain change pain, you may ask? Put simply, by understanding pain you are changing the way that you think about it, the meaning that you give to it and what you then do about it. If you do not understand your pain, like any problem, you cannot solve it, and the erroneous thoughts that one has can lead down a route of perpetuating fear, avoidance, beliefs that pain will not change. This route is one of on-going suffering. Understanding pain creates the way forward to overcoming pain; overcoming pain being the return to a meaningful life as defined by the person. When you know what you are dealing with and how to deal with it in any given moment, then you are creating the conditions for healthy change. This is the essence of Pain Coach, creating those conditions as often as possible, becoming aware of certain habits, learned behaviours and associations, compassionately correcting and moving onward with a selection of strategies. This is about getting back to life by living that life. Keeping that in the forefront of your thoughts, and letting go of distractions leads you towards your success. Let us be positive with good reason, because we are always changing, and with positive strategies.

For more information or to book an appointment, please call 07518 445493 or email [email protected]

12Aug/15

I’ve been diagnosed with CRPS

Budapest | Moyan Brenn http://bit.ly/1EnHXWp

Budapest | Moyan Brenn http://bit.ly/1EnHXWp

I’ve been diagnosed with CRPS. This is a common way that the conversation begins with people who contact me, often scared witless by what they have found out online or by what they have been told. Others are confused and do not really understand what CRPS means, except they know it hurts like hell and has turned their life upside down.

Before reading any further, have a look at this link that outlines the latest criteria named after the place where it was recently established: The Budapest Criteria 

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, also known as RSD (the old term — reflex sympathetic dystrophy), like any ‘syndrome’ is a collection of signs and symptoms that are gathered together and given a name. However, CRPS is complex (biologically), it is regional (usually affecting a limb), it is painful (one of the worst), and as I said, a syndrome. There you have it, CRPS.

Many people like to have a diagnosis, a label and a peg on which they can hang their hat. A diagnosis is useful if everyone then understands the implications and the treatment is standardised thereafter with effect. This is not the case with CRPS as few really seem to understand the condition.

Depending on where you go, you will be in receipt of treatment that varies according to the profession you see. Medically you are often offered drugs and interventions that can work to relieve some of the symptoms. As with any pain though, despite relief that everyone hopes for, drugs do not teach you how to restore normal living. For this you need to work with someone who understands the complexity of pain and CRPS and who can guide you to think in the right way so that you focus upon the right actions to move forward.

Here are some tips:

1. Read the classification and ensure that you are indeed suffering CRPS (there is type 1 and 2, which differentiate those with the condition from a non-nerve injury and a nerve injury that trigger the complex and painful responses)

2. Work with someone who genuinely understands CRPS, can educate, guide and motivate you through a comprehensive programme — that person must also know that pain can and does change!

3. Understand that medication has a role but you have a bigger role. There in only one person who can transform pain, and that is you. You just need to know how.

4. Do not nurture fear by reading about other’s difficulties online. We all suffer fear, anger and other negative emotions, but they are not helpful if they persist. You can learn the skill of deciding how to think, perceive and act using the strengths that you already possess in overcoming your pain.

5. You are NOT complex regional pain syndrome. Do not let this or any other conditions define you. You are ________ ________ (fill your name here) who is a son, brother, wife, husband, father, mother, employee, sport lover, art critic….again, fill in yourself and remember it.

6. Focus on what you can do; focus on your strengths and focus on overcoming the pain and CRPS.

The Pain Coach Programme focuses on your strengths that you will use to overcome your pain, including resilience, motivation, empathy, compassion, concentration and many others. Developing and growing your inner drive, you will learn skills and develop your knowledge so that you in effect become your own coach moment-to-moment, choosing to take each opportunity to transform and change pain on your return to a meaningful life.

t. 07518 445493

14Nov/14

5 facts about complex regional pain syndrome | CRPS

 

Thanks to modern pain science we know a huge amount about complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Of course there is much more to know, and the way in which we think and take action to tackle the problem will evolve accordingly.

 

Here are 5 facts that I believe to be important:

1. The pain is not directly related to the extent of the injury or damage — the pain in CRPS can be unimaginably horrendous without any great change in the tissue health. Remember that pain is part of the way that the body protects itself, and not an indicator of tissue damage.

2. The affected limb can feel very different to the way it looks; size and temperature included.It can even feel like it does not belong, being described as detached or ‘not mine’. The loss of sense of ownership is because the brain provides this sense, but can also modulate it.

3. The symptoms can change according to your mood and the way you feel — stress can often make the pain worse. This is due to the perceived threat to the whole person triggering protection.

4. Seeing someone else move their corresponding body part can hurt. The brain starts to plan the same movement and will also protect at this stage, causing actual pain.

5. The limb changes colour because of blood flow changes. The autonomic nervous system (ANS) controls blood flow. This is the system that responds to perceived threat — ‘freeze, flight or fright’. In essence it is a system that responds to how and what we think. When we are embarrassed, we turn red (blood flow). This is because of the way in which we think about the situation:’ I have said something that I now think is silly’, ‘Is he looking at me?’ The ANS can also become sensitive, and is very involved with CRPS — colour change, altered sense of size, sweaty palms etc.

Suffering complex regional pain syndrome? Visit my specialist CRPS clinic in London to start your programme: call 07518 445493

28Oct/14

Intense pain after wrist fracture — predicting CRPS

A recent study concluded that “… excessive baseline pain in the week after wrist fracture greatly elevates the risk of developing CRPS. Clinicians can consider a rating of greater than 5/10 to the question “What is your average pain over the last 2 days?” to be a “red flag” for CRPS”.

Most of what we need to know as clinicians comes from what the patient says. I have written previously about the importance of the narrative and taking heed. It appears from this study that paying attention to the early levels of pain after a wrist fracture can indicate a risk for developing complex regional pain syndrome.

Pain is poorly understood, especially more complex and persisting pain. Raising the level of pain understanding is fundamental to its treatment and for sufferers to overcome their problems. In knowing that intense pain (more than 5/10) could be a sign that CRPS is developing, the right action can be taken early and thereby prevent the condition evolving uncontrollably.

Of course the intensity of pain is but one dimension and clinicians should observe other characteristics of protection to design a comprehensive rehabilitation programme — e.g. inflammatory signs, posturing, behaviours and language to name but a few; this in the name of tackling the problem of pain more efficiently and successfully.

CRPS clinic in London — call us now to start your comprehensive treatment and training programme 07518 445493

 

 

02Oct/14

CRPS Research Update | October 2014 #CRPS

Welcome to the Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Research Update for October, a summary of the latest studies. 

If you are suffering with CRPS, I am here to show you how you can move forward — come and visit the CRPS clinic page here.

Spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome type 1 with dystonia: a case report and discussion of the literature.
Voet C1, le Polain de Waroux B2, Forget P2, Deumens R3, Masquelier E4.

Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) is a debilitating chronic pain disorder, the physiopathology of which can lead to dystonia associated with changes in the autonomic, central and peripheral nervous system. An interdisciplinary approach (pharmacological, interventional and psychological therapies in conjunction with a rehabilitation pathway) is central to progress towards pain reduction and restoration of function.
AIM:
This case report aims to stimulate reflection and development of mechanism-based therapeutic strategies concerning CRPS associated with dystonia.
CASE DESCRIPTION:
A 31 year old female CRPS-1 patient presented with dystonia of the right foot following ligamentoplasty for chronic ankle instability. She did not have a satisfactory response to the usual therapies. Multiple anesthetic blocks (popliteal, epidural and intrathecal) were not associated with significant anesthesia and analgesia. Mobilization of the foot by a physiotherapist was not possible. A multidisciplinary approach with psychological support, physiotherapy and spinal cord stimulation (SCS) brought pain relief, rehabilitation and improvement in the quality of life.
CONCLUSION:
The present case report demonstrates the occurrence of multilevel (peripheral and central) pathological modifications in the nervous system of a CRPS-1 patient with dystonia. This conclusion is based on the patient’s pain being resistant to anesthetic blocks at different levels and the favourable, at least initially, response to SCS. The importance of the bio-psycho-social model is also suggested, permitting behavioural change

RS: With CRPS we absolutely need to consider ‘multilevel’ modifications and adaptations within the nervous system but also how all the other systems that have a role in protecting us are functioning. This often manifests as habitual thinking and activities that maintain protection. Realising these habits, automatic by the nature of being a habit, and making changes with specific training creates new patterns of activity that head towards health.

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Longstanding Complex Regional Pain Syndrome is associated with activating autoantibodies against α-1a adrenoceptors.
Dubuis E1, Thompson V2, Leite MI3, Blaes F4, Maihöfner C5, Greensmith D6, Vincent A7, Shenker N8, Kuttikat A9, Leuwer M10, Goebel A11.

Abstract
Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a limb-confined post-traumatic pain syndrome with sympathetic features. The cause is unknown, but the results of a randomized crossover trial on low-dose IVIG treatment point to a possible autoimmune mechanism. We tested purified serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) from patients with longstanding CRPS for evidence of antibodies interacting with autonomic receptors on adult primary cardiomyocytes, comparing with control IgG from healthy and disease controls, and related the results to the clinical response to treatment with low-dose intravenous immunoglobulins (IvIG). We simultaneously recorded both single cell contractions and intracellular calcium handling in an electrical field. Ten of 18 CRPS preparations and only 1/57 control preparations (p<0.0001) increased the sensitivity of the myocytes to the electric field and this effect was abrogated by pre-incubation with alpha1a receptor blockers. By contrast, effects on baseline calcium were blocked by pre-incubation with atropine. Interestingly, serum-IgG preparations from all four CRPS patients who had responded to low-dose IVIG with meaningful pain relief were effective in these assays, although 4/8 of the non-responders were also active. To see if there were antibodies to the alpha1a receptor, CRPS-IgG was applied to alpha 1a receptor transfected rat1-fibroblast cells. The CRPS serum IgG induced calcium flux, and FACS showed that there was serum IgG binding to the cells. The results suggest that patients with longstanding CRPS have serum antibodies to alpha 1a receptors, and that measurement of these antibodies may be useful in the diagnosis and management of the patients.

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A CRPS-IgG-transfer-trauma model reproducing inflammatory and positive sensory signs associated with complex regional pain syndrome.
Tékus V1, Hajna Z1, Borbély É1, Markovics A1, Bagoly T1, Szolcsányi J2, Thompson V3, Kemény Á1, Helyes Z2, Goebel A4.

Abstract
The aetiology of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), a highly painful, usually post-traumatic condition affecting the limbs, is unknown, but recent results have suggested an autoimmune contribution. To confirm a role for pathogenic autoantibodies, we established a passive-transfer trauma model. Prior to undergoing incision of hind limb plantar skin and muscle, mice were injected either with serum IgG obtained from chronic CRPS patients or matched healthy volunteers, or with saline. Unilateral hind limb plantar skin and muscle incision was performed to induce typical, mild tissue injury. Mechanical hyperalgesia, paw swelling, heat and cold sensitivity, weight-bearing ability, locomotor activity, motor coordination, paw temperature, and body weight were investigated for 8days. After sacrifice, proinflammatory sensory neuropeptides and cytokines were measured in paw tissues. CRPS patient IgG treatment significantly increased hind limb mechanical hyperalgesia and oedema in the incised paw compared with IgG from healthy subjects or saline. Plantar incision induced a remarkable elevation of substance P immunoreactivity on day 8, which was significantly increased by CRPS-IgG. In this IgG-transfer-trauma model for CRPS, serum IgG from chronic CRPS patients induced clinical and laboratory features resembling the human disease. These results support the hypothesis that autoantibodies may contribute to the pathophysiology of CRPS, and that autoantibody-removing therapies may be effective treatments for long-standing CRPS.

RS – as ever we must consider the role of the immune system but in the light of other systems as no system works in isolation to the others. There is vast interaction between the immune system, nervous system, endocrine system and autonomic nervous system to the point where I believe we are a single system interpreting and responding. One response maybe pain as part of protection and our systems become very good at protecting us — this is not to suggest that our systems and ‘me’ are separate entities. Whole person is the only way we can sensibly think about this.

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Local Anesthetic Sympathectomy Restores fMRI Cortical Maps in CRPS I after Upper Extremity Stellate Blockade: A Prospective Case Study.
Stude P, Enax-Krumova EK1, Lenz M, Lissek S, Nicolas V, Peters S, Westermann A, Tegenthoff M, Maier C.

Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Patients with complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS I) show a cortical reorganization with contralateral shrinkage of cortical maps in S1. The relevance of pain and disuse for the development and the maintenance of this shrinkage is unclear.
OBJECTIVE:
Aim of the study was to assess whether short-term pain relief induces changes in the cortical representation of the affected hand in patients with CRPS type I.
STUDY DESIGN:
Case series analysis of prospectively collected data.
METHODS:
We enrolled a case series of 5 consecutive patients with CRPS type I (disease duration 3 – 36 months) of the non-dominant upper-limb and previously diagnosed sympathetically maintained pain (SMP) by reduction of the pain intensity of more than > 30% after prior diagnostic sympathetic block. We performed fMRI for analysis of the cortical representation of the affected hand immediately before as well as one hour after isolated sympathetic block of the stellate ganglion on the affected side.
STATISTICS:
Wilcoxon-Test, paired t-test, P < 0.05.
RESULTS:
Pain decrease after isolated sympathetic block (pain intensity on the numerical rating scale (0 – 10) before block: 6.8 ± 1.9, afterwards: 3.8 ± 1.3) was accompanied by an increase in the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response of cortical representational maps only of the affected hand which had been reduced before the block, despite the fact that clinical and neurophysiological assessment revealed no changes in the sensorimotor function.
LIMITATIONS:
The interpretation of the present results is partly limited due to the small number of included patients and the missing control group with placebo injection.
CONCLUSIONS:
The association between recovery of the cortical representation and pain relief supports the hypothesis that pain could be a relevant factor for changes of somatosensory cortical maps in CRPS, and that these are rapidly reversible

RS – we are either in pain or not in pain. If our focus is elsewhere and we are not experiencing pain, then we are not in pain. Whilst this may sound obvious, many people tell me that they are in pain all of the time. When I ask about times that they feel no pain, an oft given answer is that the pain is hidden at times when they do not feel it. Pain cannot hide. It is on-off, binary. At any given moment, we are either in pain or not in pain. Every moment changes and hence pain can change in a moment — referring to the rapidly reversible change in maps in this article; and why wouldn’t we have the ability to rapidly adapt? I believe we can change and it happens in a moment — our thinking, actions and experiences. Consider how we can be happy in a moment, and sad in a moment. Happiness is a feeling, pain is a feeling. Both have a purpose, to motivate us to do something or think in a particular way. There is a desperate need to change the globe’s thinking on pain, this being my main purpose. In doing so, we can alleviate a vast amount of suffering from pain, narrowing it down the pain that we need for survival and eliminating the pain that persists for no good reason.