Category Archives: Aches and pains

29Nov/17

Getting the best of Christmas ~ top tips if you’re suffering pain

Top tips to enjoy Christmas

Christmas top tips to thrive rather than survive!

Getting the best of Christmas ~ here are some top tips if you’re suffering pain so that you can maximise your enjoyment and create some great memories!

“get the best of you

Christmas is not an easy time for everyone. There are numerous challenges that include preparing a lunch, buying and wrapping gifts and seeing relatives. Add a layer of persistent pain, and these and other challenges are somewhat amplified. Having a plan helps you to organise your part in the festive season, allowing you to enjoy the time in the best possible way.

How are you framing the Christmas period?

The inner dialogue or script we are running has an enormous impact on how we have that very experience. If I keep telling myself that it will be tough, or tiring, or painful, then it usually is and more so. In essence we are feeding the prediction plus our choice of behaviour will enact those thoughts. So, write a positive script that is rich with all that you want. This does not necessarily mean that it turns out exactly this way, but it will be much better than if we anticipate the worst. What we focus upon we get more of!

My Christmas will be ______________. Fill in the blank and keep focusing on this picture and how you can go about doing your best to achieve it. This is the basic model of success used by anyone who has achieved results, including you! Clarify the picture of what you want and then decide upon the principles to follow to do your best to get there.

Make a plan

For each day of the festive period make a plan. You will need to prioritise your activities and create space for ‘refresh and renew’ time. To prioritise you can make a list of all the things you want to do. Then categorise them A-C (A the most important), before numbering 1, 2, 3, 4 etc (1 the most important).

Your plan is flexible, meaning that if it does not turn out exactly as you wished, you can accept the changes. It is useful to have a set of principles to follow, which allow for flexibility within the plan. Here are some examples;

  1. Knowing that wherever you are, you can create calm by using breathing or imagery, either because you are aware of a more intense emotional state or just because you wish to plug in and recharge.
  2. Motion is lotion is a way of nourishing yourself with simple movements that you know are safe, despite how they may feel at the time. Pain and stiffness are both need states that we perceive in order to choose an action that will satisfy the need. This is much like hunger and thirst.
  3. Refresh and renew time is when you deeply relax, engage in something pleasurable, have a conversation, listen to music, look at a scene with awe, practice gratitude.

Write your plan out so that you are much more likely to commit. You may like to share your plan with someone as a further way of cementing your intended actions.

Motion is lotion

Movement is fundamental for our health as it is the way we nourish our body and our brain (the two are not separate–we are whole). Movement is part of the way we are and the way we represent ourselves to the world. Consider how you can recognise a friend from far away by the way that they walk.

Motion is lotion is the consistent practice of moving, little and often through the day. Stiffness is a common bedfellow of pain due to the guarding (overactive) muscles that become tense and tight. The feeling of stiffness is inferred as a way to make us move, much like pain is an inferred (whole person) state to make us protect ourselves and meet the impending need.

Repeated simple movements that are tolerable or feel good will build the evidence that we are actually safe. This momentum creates a new back story that informs the next moment in such a way as to drive easier and easier movements. This is a practice and must be used through the day, every day. As a guide, when sedentary, change position every 15 minutes, and stand up every 30 minutes. Part of your planning (see above) will be how you can integrate movement into your day.

Be aware of what is happening right now

Being ‘in the moment’ is not just a phrase. There is no rehearsal for life; this is it. ‘Life is long if you know how to use it’ is Seneca’s classic title. Using our time wisely maximises the opportunities we have presented to us each day, together with an openness to experience. The beginner’s mind illustrates this well, whereby we maintain a wonder about our perception of the world that unfolds each moment, much like a small child walking into a grotto, experiencing the impact of the lights and aromas of Christmas.

Mindful practice is about being present, aware and open to all experiences without judgement. Noticing emotions, feelings, thoughts and sensations as they come and as they go is at the heart of the practice, however they appear. Quickly we can become familiar with the impermanent nature of things, so no matter what you are feeling right now, it will pass. We can easily integrate mindfulness into our day with a simple ‘formal’ practice of 10-15 minutes together with moment to moment awareness through the day. The latter is achieved by paying attention to a few breaths, which bring you to the present moment rather than dwelling and embodying the past or an anticipated future.

A further practice is to notice positive feelings and emotions through the day as they arise. ‘What we focus on, we get more of’, is a phrase I repeat to clients, as they train themselves to build awareness of all perceptions, in particular those that feel good. The broaden and build effect of noticing positive emotions has been well studied by Barbara Fredrickson, and it only takes a short period of practice for the impact to grow. Good feelings can often be subtle and pass by quickly, whereas negative emotions often hit us hard and linger for long periods. Paying attention to each moment as often as you can, permits the awareness of the positive in its many forms, building your wellness and ability to notice more. There will be plenty of good feelings to notice if you choose to create a positive approach to Christmas, pay attention and address your ever changing needs (see below).

Meeting your needs

We can strongly argue that feelings arising in the body are the conscious emergence of need states. I feel thirsty, I feel hungry, I have an itch, are all common examples. Pain and stiffness are also need states that motivate us to take action to meet the need, perhaps more urgently that some of the others.

When we feel thirst, this is a user-friendly representation of complex biology (sub-personal), which we only need consider as a percept to address by drinking. Pain can be considered in the same light to a degree. The variance comes from the desire to know why we are in pain. Is it something really dangerous? Clinicians must do their best to answer this question for the person.

Much of the suffering comes not from the pain itself, but the way in which the person interprets and thinks about the pain. This is why understanding pain is so important, and why many people feel immediate relief on knowing the answer. If you consider that pain is based upon the perception of threat, understanding pain is a way to reduce this threat together with knowing what can be done.

On feeling thirsty, we drink until the feeling appears to pass. On feeling pain, we must keep using our practices to create the conditions of ‘safety’ until we start to sense an easing, which will come. This may be repetition for a good period of time along with consistent practices we are using to get better overall. We must also address the reasons why, if we know, the state may have arisen. For example, a situation that is perceive as stressful, tiredness, anxiety, different or new movements, or a change of environment to name but a few. Pain is embodied and embedded in the context of your life, hence all factors need attention and new approaches engaged where existing ones fail.

An example to illustrate: I have neck pain sitting at my desk. I must move and stretch to nourish, and keep doing so until there is a sense of relief (this may need to be consistent through the day). I must also address the reasons why it could be painful. For example, I have sat here for a long time repeating the same posture and movement, I am feeling anxious about this piece of work or a forthcoming meeting, my mind is wandering, I am tired. Without considering all influences as well as the actual perception, there is not adequate reason for your body systems that protect you to shift gears. We actively shift gears with new thinking and new actions.

Summary

Here I have outlined some simple practices and approaches that you can decide to adopt for not only the Christmas period, but in a way to overcome your pain. The Pain Coach Programme is a practical approach to living life and building wellness as a buffer to the challenges that arise for each person. We can choose our style of ‘doing life’, and this has a significant impact upon whether we reach our potential or not. The Programme is about getting the best of you, or peak performance in different areas of your life. Each day presents a range of opportunities. Which will you engage with?

Here’s an equation:

(My current physical ability – my tolerance) + my approach = what I achieve

“How can I be the best me, and enjoy the process? 

** Please note that these practices should not replace your existing treatment or therapy programme. You should always check with your healthcare professional if unsure.


To start your Pain Coach Programme, to organise a Pain Coach Workshop or for clinician 1:1 mentoring, contact Jo 07518 445493

16May/15

Blue genes | more pain in winter?

A new study has shown that our immune system increases its pro-inflammatory status in the winter months — blue genes! We are naturally more inflammatory at certain times of the day (early hours of the morning; one reason for morning stiffness), but with an overall increase in pro-inflammatory messengers there is a greater likelihood of sensitivity and pain. Recall that pain is a whole body response to a perceived threat, and with more inflammatory molecules floating around the body, sensitising nerve endings, and thereby raising the chances of nociception (nociception does not necessarily result in pain).

How often do you hear people blame the weather for their pain, especially joint pain? This could go some way to explaining this phenomena, as well as the idea that an association develops between cold, damp weather and stiff, painful joints. In winter, the reactive immune system sets the scene for these experiences, perhaps as a way to motivate hibernation.

As a consequence of these findings, we should think about how we both explain people’s experiences of pain and conditions with an inflammatory character: e.g./ coughs, colds, heart disease and autoimmune diseases, and what we do to promote health. This could also explain mood as there is good data that depression could be an inflammatory condition as well as affect diabetes, also thought to have an inflammatory basis.

Read the full article here.

Pain Coach Programme to overcome chronic pain – call us on 07518 445493

16Apr/15

Mindfulness is a great skill

Mindfulness is a great skill to learn at any age. To be mindful simply means to be aware of what is happening right now and without judgement–notice how you judge your thoughts and how that makes you feel.

Everything that we are aware of is our own, unique interpretation that emerges from our belief system. We appraise our thoughts, our actions, others, and the environment around us. This appraisal evokes an emotional and bodily response in many cases, even if it is just a shrug of the shoulders. It is important to clarify that emotions, body responses, thoughts and actions are all part of one and the same; i.e. the whole person. Sadly, much of the thinking, particularly in health, remains Cartesian and separates mind and body. This is despite reams of research papers and common sense telling us otherwise. What does your tummy do when you think about giving the presentation tomorrow? Your body reacts in response to the thought, and that reaction involves the nervous system, the motor system, the brain, the immune system etc etc….WHOLE PERSON.

So, if the appraisal or our perception guides how we respond, then we have a buffer between any give situation or thought and what happens next. We have a choice — ‘the greatest weapon against stress is our ability to choose one thought over another’ said the great philosopher William James. Shakespeare had insight: ‘there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so’.

Mindfulness is the skill that allows you to observe thoughts and interpretations rather than become embroiled, living out thinking that is felt in the body as emotions and tensions. You notice with quiet curiosity how your body is responding, lifting the veil of suffering.  We have that choice, but most don’t realise, operating on automatic overdrive leading to repeated stress physiology that affects every body system.

A stress response is designed to protect us from the dangers of wild animals. The same responses kick in to a threatening thought–the most dangerous things we face are our own thoughts and interpretations: a shadow after watching a horror film is threatening because of the way you think about it and create a story of a murderer lurking behind the tree. Actually, it’s a cat but that story does not feature. What stories do you tell yourself to create fear? How useful is fear? Not very.

Fear triggers further negative thinking, and that gets us nowhere. Respect and understanding create opportunities to learn and grow. Much better.

How are you mindful? If you look on the bookshelves, tome after tome sits there awaiting your mind. It seems that everyone has something to say on the matter. The reality is that mindful practice is simple. Practice is a habit that needs to be grooved. You must fail and fail and fail again. That is how we learn. And when you think you are good, fail again to get better. Learn to love failing because then you are getting better!

Start being mindful by noticing what is happening now. Where are you? What are you thinking? How are you feeling? Take a breath and observe it. The rise and fall of your chest and tummy. It’s a wonderful feeling to sit still. Especially in this crazy, high speed world with demands pouring in digitally and otherwise. Simply recall that whatever comes your way, it is your perception that counts. You are in charge of that perception. Make a choice. Create calm so that your body systems can do their job and slip out of protect mode and into health mode. On-going stress accounts for and contributes to most of the modern day ills–chronic pain, infertility, headaches, chronic inflammation, IBS etc etc. To think effectively about stress we need to look at it as a societal, cultural, physiological, personal phenomena.

So, I thought I would write a book about it as well. A very short one. Coming soon.

Mindfulness practice is part of the Pain Coach programme; a complete strategy to overcome chronic pain | t. 07518 445493

28Sep/14

Fibromyalgia in women | #fibromyalgia

I see many women suffering with fibromyalgia. I also see many women who have widespread aches and pains, frequently without an injury, but rather a gradual increase in pain across the body. This maybe fibromyalgia, but in essence we are talking about sensitisation that evolves if no action is taken.

The commonest profile is this: a woman with young children (may have had some problems conceiving), aches and pains across the body, disturbed sleep or too little sleep, always tired, emotions and mood vary, concentration and focus can wax and wane, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS — bloating, pain), migraines, headaches, jaw pain (perhaps grinding in her sleep), anxious, ‘stressy’, very little time to rest and recuperate, repeated bladder infections (often there is no actual infection, but the symptoms are the same) and poor recovery from illnesses. 

There is a common biological thread with these problems. On appearance it would be logical to assume that they are unrelated — many healthcare professionals also take this view. BUT, this is not the case. These functional pain syndromes are all manifest of adaptations in the nervous system, immune system, autonomic nervous system and endocrine system. The good news is that the changes are not set in stone because we are mouldable, or plastic. We learn and adapt according to our thinking, beliefs and actions.

Understanding your pain changes your thinking so this is the initial step. Thoughts are based on beliefs and evolve to ‘I can change my pain’ when you know the facts. First setting up your thinking, then creating a vision to aim for and finally making a definite plan to follow allows you to head towards sustainable change with healthy habits. It is a challenge, but one that is wholly worthwhile.

Women in Pain Clinic is based at 132 Harley Street in London — call now to start your programme and move forward 07932 689081

 

 

14Jan/14

Are you turned on?

At the risk of sounding ambiguous, many people are turned on. In particular, city dwellers and workers who are being hit with innumerable stimuli, bombarding the senses, triggering on-going responses by the brain, the mind and the body. Whether it be the noise of the traffic, the lights at night, the phantom vibrations of the phone, pollution or close-quarter travel on the train, outputs are being generated by the nervous system, the immune system and the endocrine system that are experienced as thoughts, feelings and physical sensations, some being pleasant, others not so.

Once a chronic state of arousal has been reached, the on-going energy demands can eventually result in burn-out or a gradual state of declining physical and mental health — the two being inextricably linked.

How does this manifest?

The all-too common conditions that we see include general body-wide muscular aches and pains, headaches and migraines, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), anxiety, indigestion, pelvic pain, fertility issues. The thread that ties these seemingly unrelated problems is stress. Stress however, is a physiological response to a situation that is perceived to be threatening. Two people can give entirely different meanings to a particular scenario, thereby having diverse experiences — it is all about an individual’s perception. Our perception is based upon beliefs about the world, sculpted over the years by exposure and influences.

The biological response to threat involves the autonomic nervous system and the motor system at least, preparing to either flee from the danger or confront the situation. An incredible set of responses, they evolved from the need to deal with wild animals. Fortunately this does not happen too often these days, but there are plenty of potential threats including the thoughts that pass through our mind. The brain does not differentiate between a thought and actually being present. The response is similar and usually thinking about something unpleasant that may happen will lead to feelings of anxiety — tingling in the tummy, tension, increased pain.

If these systems are persistently triggered by stress, there is less opportunity for smooth digestion, conception, healing and clarity. Being chronically turned on hence results in digestive issues, sensitivity of the bowel (bloating, pain etc), difficulty conceiving (thoughts of sex and conceiving are not going to be high on the brain’s agenda if there is a constant perception of danger) and pain that results from gradual changes in the tissues. In fact, every body system is impacted upon by the chemicals released during an on-going stress response. And not in a good way. Performance is affected, mood varies, sleep is disrupted, concentration is poor, catastrophising becomes rife and negative thinking about life predominates.

How do we turn off?

Relaxation or having the ability to switch off is often a skill that requires learning and practice. Going to the gym, having a cigarette or a coffee is not turning off. These are all stimulating a system that is already fraught. It is the calming, restorative, digestive and healing mechanisms that need to be fortified.

Promoting calm in a habitual way across the day is a potent way of re-programming the right responses for the right scenarios. Checking in on the body and thought processes, attending to the present moment rather than automatically drifting into the past or future, avoiding stimulation (e.g./ electronic screens, coffee, cigarettes, sugary foods and drink, certain reading material), mindful practice, breathing techniques and cultivating focused attention are all ways in which we can build our positive bank account in terms of energy and feeling good. Creating good habits. Exercise although stimulating, and certainly in a gym with bright lights and loud music, should form part of a routine for the overall healthy benefits. It is the best wonder drug that we know of and it is free.

Changing behaviours is difficult but it is achievable with the right programme that addresses both body and mind. Cultivating a routine around sleep, movement, diet, exercise, mindfulness, work and family will groove a healthy, resilient, positive and happy path forward. Turn off.

08Jan/14

A quick note on… skiing — pain and injury

It is that time of year when many set off for the slopes for the joy of being on a mountain, the freedom of sliding, or bumping, down the piste and finishing the day with a favoured tipple, preferably in the sun. Sadly this is not always the case as there will be aches and pains, to be expected, and more serious injuries that require medical and surgical attention.

Firstly, the aches and pains. When we are active in a different way it usually hurts and that is normal. Waking up and trying to get out of bed with stiffness is never fun but it commonly eases off by the time a shower has been had and movement has been initiated. By and large, these aches and pains lessen as the week progresses and we are used to all the physical labours of carrying skis, poles and general clobber by the time we are heading home. I do not know how many people actively seek to improve their fitness before going skiing but many threaten to do so. If you are preparing, starting the week before will probably not do too much, but you may as well give it a go. Don’t go mad and pull a muscle. Ideally, several months before you should be undertaking exercises that in some way replicate skiing. Simple measures such as warming up and cooling down are often forgotten. Warming-up should involve easy mobilisation exercises of the whole body and cooling down in a similar way interlaced with a few stretches of the back and legs. Please note that you should always seek specific advice on exercises that are appropriate for you.

The more serious injuries involving ligaments, bones and tendons will need accurate diagnosis, good early management — that includes you knowing what has happened and everything that you should be doing physically and mentally to optimise healing; and there are many many things that you can do — pain control and a clear route forward of what needs to be done.

If you wish to prepare for your skiing trip and want to know more, or if you’ve suffered an injury that requires rehabilitation, please contact us now to find out how to go about getting back on the slopes and to normal living: 07932 689081

13Nov/12

A quick word on daily aches and pains

Everyone experiences aches and pains each day of a varying nature. Some are fleeting twinges, others are associated with an injury, sitting too long and stress, or in many cases there is a gradual creep over a period of time. The process of going from a pain free state to a painful state is complex and contextual. In other words, there are a number of factors that determine whether or not we feel pain and how much we feel.

What is normal?

In a sense this depends upon the individual and his or her take upon their pain. What meaning do you give to the pain? Our experience will be coloured by this meaning, for example, the response in thought and action to ‘I have sat too long’ versus ‘I have serious tissue damage’ will be very different. This is simply why it is so important that we explain pain so that we can disarm the threat and take control of a pathway forwards.

When aches and pains persist

It seems that around 1 in 5 people suffer on-going pain. This is a big chunk of society with painful problems that can have serious affects upon quality of life. Many people whom I see tell me of their limitations, avoidances, fears, stresses and other ways in which the pain is impacting upon them. Often there is a lack of understanding of what is really going on in the body and this creates its own form of worry that can only perpetuate the pain and tension.

In particular there is a noticeable trend in my clinics around women in pain – see first part of a series of blogs looking at women and pain here. There are frequently widespread pains and sensitivities tied in with emotional stresses. We know a great deal about the interaction of stress and pain now and that many persisting problems are underpinned by central sensitisation. This is an adaptation within the nervous system that explains certain patterns of pain that we can target with a range of modern therapies born out of the latest neuroscience.

Thinking differently about pain

Once pain is understood there can be a significant and positive shift in how an individual approaches the problem. Alongside this re-framing we would typically use treatments and training (physical and cognitive) to develop confidence in moving, exercising and engaging in other activities that reduce symptoms and improve wellbeing. This really is a time of using sense and science for health and performance.

If you are suffering on-going aches and pains that are affecting day to day living, please contact us to see how you can change: T 07518 445491 or via the contact form here

12Nov/12

Aches and pains in Chelsea

Sitting in the heart of Chelsea just off Sloane Square, our clinic at The Chelsea Consulting Rooms is the place to come with your persisting aches and pains. Pain is a normal everyday experience of course, but when it persists, pain is less useful and becomes the source of suffering and limitation. We can stop doing the things we love, have difficulty with day-to-day tasks and become increasingly unfit, all of which affect our quality of life.

Making changes

When you are restricted by pain or cannot resume activities because of pain or a recurring injury, life becomes frustrating. Our mood and motivation can be affected. Our thinking can start to revolve around the pain that begins to determine our choices. On a lesser level, the pain intensity may be low but the impact is persistent. Each experience is individual.

We are absolutely focused on change. Our bodies and brains are designed to change and adapt and we need to make sure that yours are going in the right direction. Can pain change? Yes.

Pain: understand it, tackle it and live

What do we see?

Commonly we see patients suffering back pain, neck pain, repetitive strain injury (RSI), knee pain, arthritic pain, recurring sports injuries and more widespread pains. In females we often find that the original reason for coming along is part of a picture of sensitivity that manifests in a number of places – see blog series here on Women in Pain.

But why do people come along?

The answer to this question can be very different from the conditions that we identify as commonly seen at the clinic. Is the question, ‘What is the problem?’ No, the question is, ‘What is MY problem that I need help with right now?’

Usually people come to the clinic because there is something that they cannot do, are struggling to resume or the problem is impacting upon important aspects of life: ‘The problem is that I cannot pick up my child’, ‘I cannot sit at my desk for long meaning that I do not do all of my work’, ‘I have tried to run again but it hurts so I have stopped completely’. These and the many other problems that people describe are what we focus upon as goals to be achieved.

This is done by understanding the underlying pain mechanisms and employing a treatment programme born out of the latest neuroscience that tackles the sources and influences. We identify key habits and behaviours that may have been useful and protective but are now in the way of progress and create new ways of promoting health so that you can lead a meaningful life. And we really enjoy doing it!

Exercise with confidence | Work at ease | Enjoy family life | Healthy movement and activity

Contact us for information or to book an appointment in Chelsea or at our other locations in Harley Street, Temple and Newe Malden: 07518 445493