29Jun/15
'neck' by JB | https://flic.kr/p/4VYHd1

Overcoming neck pain

'neck' by JB | https://flic.kr/p/4VYHd1

‘neck’ by JB | https://flic.kr/p/4VYHd1

Overcoming neck pain is the aim of the many sufferers of this common persisting problem–it’s in the top 10 of global health burdens! What causes neck pain? Regular readers will be familiar with the notion that pain emerges in the person, located where protection is deemed necessary. The feeling of pain, (‘I am in pain’) exists as a motivator through its unpleasantness, demanding attention and action sufficient to reduce the threat and hence leading to pain relief.

The question to ponder upon is why is this person in pain? What has created such a threat value that there is benefit from a painful experience to drive some form of change in thought and action and vice versa, such that the threat diminishes. What can potentially pose a threat? We have to say potentially because these factors will not bring about a pain response in all people as we know. The existence of pain and intensity of pain do not rely upon these factors. Instead it is the meaning and the significance given to these factors that determines what happens next. Consciously I may not believe that sitting for an hour is ‘dangerous’, yet from my body, which of course is not separate from who I think ‘I’ am, emerges the feeling of pain. This is where the sense of self becomes confusing because how can my body be separate from ‘me’. We often use language, especially to do with pain, that distances ourselves from the feeling, except this is erroneous thinking as the pain is emerging in us, much like a thought emerges and becomes conscious. Consciousness is the background upon which a small amount of what is going on appears to us, including pain and other sensory experiences that can frequently evoke emotions.

Examples of factors that can be rated as dangerous:

  • Inflammation (tissue damage, neurogenic)
  • Infection
  • Contexts: e.g. sitting at a desk, driving, carrying a bag
  • Thoughts: the meaning that we give to the pain
  • Stress: this is a response to perceiving a situation as being threatening rather than the actual situation itself
  • Tiredness

In other words we must look beyond, well beyond the area that hurts and think about the person and their life, which includes environments in which they inhabit (home, work, play), people they spend time with, things that they do, past experiences, pain vulnerabilities. This is the same for pain in the neck as it is with any other persisting pain problem. Only with a comprehensive view can we think broadly enough to devise a programme of treatment, training and coaching to sustainably overcome the problem.

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Pain Coach Programme to sustainably overcome persisting and complex pain. Call now: 07518 445493

21Jun/15
Social Innovation Camp (2009)

Caring for our elderly

Social Innovation Camp (2009)

Social Innovation Camp (2009)

Caring for our elderly is a society wide responsibility. On a micro level, individuals care for family members or friends. On a macro level, the government must create a framework that permits this to happen effectively as well as ensuring that supporting services for carers are accessible and fair. This blog is about the former, suggesting a way of thinking to help carers optimise their effectiveness. However, if a policy maker is reading, you should be considering how to best facilitate and support these straight forward strategies.

There are a multitude of problems associated with being older, but we must not forget that it is a person and not just a range of conditions. An individual is living the experience that we observe, and if this lived experience is painful, limiting, confusing or isolating, we can only imagine what this must be like. There is no better example than dementia, when that person’s reality is shifted brutally into a seeming groundhog day. We have no idea what this can be like, but we must empathise and realise that many of the behaviours are due to fear and anxiety re-lived over and over.

A simple example: an individual spending more time in bed than being up and about, also suffering dementia. The stiffness in the body ensues and often needs easing with gentle therapy. The passive movements when another person takes hold of your body to move the joints or massage the muscles can be painful as a norm. However, this can provoke a protective response as the person withdraws their limb for fear of pain or it actually hurts. The pain eases with the treatment and relief can be obvious. The next day, the same fear is evoked as there has been no memory laid down from the previous day, so the whole experience is repeated as if new, fears and all.

Remembering that the person is that, a person, is a guiding light in our thinking. Cultivating compassion through the practice of working with the vulnerable is a valuable skill to benefit both the recipient of the care and the giver. Seeing the experience for what it really is, rather than clouding it with thoughts, allows the carer to focus on the individual and their needs. These are simple practices that just need to become habits, and when they do, amazing things can happen. It is not for me to tell you what they are, but if you do practice, you will soon know.

Here are a handful of tips that I routinely give to carers:

  • Create calm in your own mind before every interaction, even if it is just a few moments of breathing and re-focusing.
  • Be present throughout the session, noticing all that is happening right now.
  • Use a calm voice and smooth movements — before changing someone’s position or encouraging them to move, explain calmly what you will be doing and why; even if you are not sure they will understand. It will put you in the right frame of mind and perhaps they will pick up on your tone and compassioned intention.
  • Use touch skillfully. Stroking has amazing effects on the body sense, sculpting the feel of the body for that person as you send signals into the brain maps as well as creating a soothing atmosphere and calming the person.
  • Position the individual so that they can be alert to all the stimuli around them. You know what it feels like to be slumped in bed or in a chair — stiff, lethargic etc. Change their position so that they can be part of what is happening whilst you talk to them and engage as much as possible in a positive tone. Remember that the position our body takes affects how we feel. Make someone feel good by giving them height and posture.

There are many more easy things that we can do to make a massive difference. Carers have a key role and if they know and understand all the influence that they can have, it changes everything for the better.

I encourage carers to come to sessions or to come alone to learn about what they can do. Feeling empowered as a carer is really important, and the Pain Coach programme incorporates the needs of the carer so that the relationship with the patient is bi-directionally healthy.

Call me for further details on the Pain Coach programme: 07518 445493

20Jun/15
migraine by r. nial bradshaw (2012)

The problem of migraine

migraine by r. nial bradshaw (2012)

migraine by r. nial bradshaw (2012)

The problem of migraine is bigger than most people realise. In fact, the problem of chronic pain is bigger than most people realise, this being apparent as I purposely ask people I know and meet if they know what is the number one global health burden. It is chronic pain by the way, and migraine and headache sit in the top 10 along with back pain, neck pain and osteoarthritis. Depression is at number 2.

Migraine is sometimes referred to as a functional pain syndrome. Not everyone likes this term, myself included, yet it’s use does mean that we can consider migraine as one of a number of conditions that hurt and cause great suffering. These conditions have a common biology known as central sensitisation, meaning that the individual’s systems that protect are more likely to do so, resulting in persisting pain in many cases.

The other well known functional pain syndromes include irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), temporomandibular disorder (or jaw pain, clicky jaw etc), pelvic pain, dysmennorhoea, vulvodynia, interstitial cystitis, chronic back pain and fibromyalgia. These are often co-morbid with anxiety, depression and hypermobility. As individuals, it is common to find perfectionist or obsessive traits that may be useful in certain arenas such as work, helping to achieve great success, yet in other areas of life cause problems. More women than men report these problems, although I am seeing increasing numbers of men who often describe groin pain as a starter but then we explore the history and discover one or more of the aforementioned list. A further frequent finding is difficulty conceiving, this primarily due to the body systems that protect being persistently fired up (by normal living and exposures as well as stressors), and whilst that person is in such a mode, having children is not on the body’s agenda whereas survival is.

As with most of the functional pains, the story highlights certain vulnerabilities that can increase the likelihood of persisting pain including genetics, epigenetics, early life stressors and prior infections/injuries. These factors sculpt the systems that protect as they learn how to respond as well as becoming increasingly vigilant. The combination therewith creates an individual who is more likely to respond to actual or potential threat with vigorous and prolonged action and behaviours. With anxiety in the mix, this person is then likely to over-worry, which in effect further raises the threat value and heighten the responses even more. And so it goes on.

Rarely are the conditions explained adequately to patients, and certainly knowledge of the link between the seemingly different problems has never been volunteered to me by a patient. Therein lies a problem that the individual is suffering one or more pains and other symptoms (e.g./ tiredness, poor concentration, disrupted sleep, lethargy, flu-like symptoms, brain fog), yet they have no understanding as to why, or how it comes on, or what they can and must do to change the situation and move forward. Explaining the condition(s), the links, what the patient needs to do and what we can do to help and support them over a period of time that we can estimate is a key start point.

Further to the common biology, we can observe in the clinic the posturing, movements, guarding, poor body sense, altered sensorimotor function and the overall manifestation of how that person is feeling through body language and the words they use. We can gather far more information about the person, the whole person, by talking to them, listening to them and their concerns. What is their lived experience? The structured interview does not allow for this conversation. Yes we need some specific questions, but creating an open environment gives the person a chance to talk, feel heard and validated. This sets the scene for specific training, techniques and strategies that need to be used throughout the day and the development of understanding, all of which are the knowledge and skill base that the patient needs to overcome their pain.

No matter how long you have had pain, it can and does change. We are designed to change, and this is happening all the time. We are on a continuum, and we can have a say in where we go. It is a challenge and requires dedication, motivation, resilience and practice, but with the right thinking, action and support, great things can be achieved. I am honoured to see this happen in the clinic every week as people overcome their pain and resume being who they think they should be.

If you are suffering or think that you could be suffering with functional pain syndromes, call me for a chat and we can decide what you need to do to start overcoming your pain: 07518 445493

Clinics in Harley Street, Chelsea and New Malden Diagnostic Centre

17Jun/15

Sticks and stones

Sticks and stones by Coloured Pencil Magazine (2014)

The old saying goes, “sticks and stones will break my bones, but words can never harm me”, however this is not exactly true when it comes to messages that are used to explain pain. Of course you could argue that words only cause harm if we interpret them as harmful rather than what they are per se, just words. Easier said than done!

Earlier this week I saw the word ‘instability’ written in reference to low back pain. This is a word that has been used frequently as a means to justify the use of something to create ‘stability’ and hence solve back pain. It has not worked.

The reason it has not worked is because there is no instability, and more importantly because pain is not a structure. I emboldened those words.

Pain is a whole person, emerging in that whole person in respect of a perceived threat. That is not a structure or a pathology. It is the whole person’s response to that pathology or injury that manifests as pain (in a bodily location), involving a number of systems that have a role in protecting us: e.g./ the nervous system, autonomic nervous system, immune system, sensorimotor system.

An injury or a pathology is not the same as pain. We cannot equate them as they are poorly related. An injury is an injury, and pain is pain, the latter being one of a number of responses to the former.

Back to instability. What does it suggest to the recipient of the message, “You have instability, which is why you have back pain”? How will this affect their pain, bearing in mind this is a pretty threatening thought? How will it affect their movement?

If there is true instability from a serious injury or a pathology that has affected the vertebrae to a significant degree, this calls for urgent surgical care. We are not talking about this scenario though, rather the number one global health burden that is low back pain. This pain is not explained by instability. If anything, the use of this word creates dependence rather than a proactive approach to restoring normal, confident movement and living life with less or no pain.

Pain is the vehicle that brings most people to the clinic. We need to give meaning to the individual’s meaning about their pain that they have already created, bringing their thinking into alignment with what we really know about pain. We must convey the right messages from the start to reduce the risk of chronicity. I just want to add that we need to tackle pain in the broadest way from the beginning, incorporating all dimensions–physical, emotional and cognitive–but importantly, how these interact as the whole person with prior experience, beliefs, genetics, gender, co-morbidities etc. The step-wise approach of trying medication, then physio, then interventions, then psychology etc (not always in that order!) does not work. It does not work. The whole-person needs to be addressed from word go. The whole climate and culture of health-caring for pain must change. And this includes the words we use, in reference to my earlier point.

When we understand pain, the actions that we take change for the better. When it makes sense and we know that we are safe to move and live, it takes us in the right direction. Each person has their own lived experience of pain that has been cultivated through the development of all the protective systems that have been subject to prior demands, and learned how to react in certain situations. This makes some people more vulnerable to chronic pain. Let’s help these people by asking the right questions at the start so that we can change the course that they are heading on.

We can and must do better. The science is there to be used and the thinking is there to be used. With the blending of neuroscience and philosophical thought, we are now in a time of great optimism. We can make lasting change for our generation and the next as we change our thinking and take big action across society and the globe, together.

********

Richmond Stace: Specialist Pain Physiotherapist

My overarching aim is to change the way that society thinks about pain so that we can tackle what is the number one global health burden, chronic pain. One to one with individual sufferers, via writing and talking, and the UP | Understand Pain campaign, I hope to shift thinking so that we can reduce the suffering that people feel across the globe.

15Jun/15
Richmond Stace MCSP MSc (Pain) BSc (Hons)

My pain story

Richmond Stace MCSP MSc (Pain) BSc (Hons)

People ask me how and why I work in chronic and complex pain, and often follow-up with the question of whether I experience on-going pain. Here’s my pain story.

In the early 90’s I trained to be a Registered Nurse. This was not a career that I wished to pursue, however the training was a wonderful three years spent learning about what it is to be human. I made it my business to see as much as I could, go to as many places as I could, gathering the most incredible experiences that now I deem to be of the upmost value.

It was this early introduction to illness, disease, dying, death and life that I realised some years later, to be the sculptor of my values and beliefs. Of course being 19 years old at the time, I did not fully appreciate what I was submerging myself into, yet somehow I did know that it was important to push myself into difficult situations. These you face consistently in healthcare, particularly as a nurse on the wards and in the community. Working with people who are being pushed to their extremes gives you an appreciation of life itself.

It was whilst I was a student nurse that the concept of pain grabbed my interest. Why did different people respond in different ways? Now it is far clearer having spent the last 19 years thinking about and studying pain. However, at the time I was baffled and surrounded by explanations that were based on the body and structures–the biomedical model, which still predominates today sadly.

Between nursing and physiotherapy I read a degree in Sport Rehabilitation as I thought that this would fill the gap. I loved sport and this seemed like a happy union. Interesting as it was, I felt that I needed to be a physiotherapist and so I trooped off to physio school. This is where it all started to fall into place when I attended a lecture on pain given by Dr Mick Thacker. It was a massive ‘aha’ moment, and I never looked back. The session focused on the mechanisms of pain, and even at that early stage I realised the potential for understanding the variable and contextual nature of pain. Mick’s on-going input that came directly from his vast experience and immense knowledge grooved a way forward that was immediately applicable in the clinic. It was so exciting to be able to appreciate what was happening biologically to manifest in the way that pain can and does.

Since this time, I have continued to look at pain in many different ways. This was propelled by continuing to work under Mick’s tutorage in the form of the Pain MSc at Kings College London. Not only did we explore the depths of pain, what it is, what it means and how it comes about, but we also learned how to think and ask questions. I will never forget having to role-play with Mick in front of the group whilst he took the part of a patient. It was a fine performance on his part.

The Pain MSc at Kings College was some years ago now, but the grounding from all my experiences to date, and these are of course on-going, has really created my ‘physio-self’ but also my ‘self-self’ as I explore neuroscience, cognitive sciences, philosophy and other fields to understand what it is to be human. To understand this I believe, is to get to the root of the pain experience but also the plethora of conscious experiences that we embody every day.

The answer to the question of whether I feel pain and experience on-going pain is yes. The advantage of my understanding is that I can play myself certain messages that help, i.e. reduce the threat, and take action that I purport on a daily basis. It is always interesting to consider how pain clinicians and pain scientists perceive pain, and how this could be different to a non-clinician/scientist. There is a whole blog to be written on this subject!

RS

Richmond specialises in treating and coaching individuals to overcome their chronic and complex pain using a programme called ‘Pain Coach’. Pain Coach is a comprehensive programme that addresses all dimensions of pain in an integrated manner; i.e. considering the whole person and all the body systems contributions to the emergence of pain. Pain Coach training is available for clinicians in small groups and as 1:1 mentoring. For more details, please visit the home page or call 07518 445493.

11Jun/15
Stiffness and low back pain

Stiff low back. Why?

Stiffness and low back painHave you got a stiff low back? Stiffness is often part of the picture of low back pain. Why is this?

Stiffness is a conscious experience–a feeling that we sense, interpret and then label as ‘stiff’, usually describing difficulty moving a body part. And just like any other conscious experience, there are the embodied dimensions as well as cognitive and emotional elements: how does it feel? What does it mean for me? Hence to think about stiffness is to think about the body-body systems that create the feeling and meaning.

Stiff low back: there are three common types of stiffness that are addressed in different ways.

  1. Stiffness from actual shortening of the muscles and their compounding tissues
  2. Stiffness from muscles being told to be ‘on’
  3. Stiffness from changes at the joint

Stiffness from actual shortening occurs due to sustained positions or repeated positions being held so that the tissues change in their length. In so doing, there is less freedom of movement at the joints. This tends to gradually worsen as time progresses, with less and less movement at the joint causing further shortening. Regular movement, nudging into the limitation is key in overcoming this aspect of stiffness along with manual treatment that gives you the experience of movement into that part of the range. The manual treatment must sit alongside your understanding of what is happening and why this therapy is being applied, otherwise ‘top-down’ influences can interfere with success (see next section).

Stiffness from muscles instructed to be ‘on’ by the brain is part of the way that the body protects. Otherwise called guarding, the body-brain’s continual planning, expectation, anticipation and desire are embodied, responding to the environment and the context of the situation at that moment. Within our consciousness, different experiences seemingly appear and then fade away as others emerge. Stiffness and pain are no different in this respect, however they may emerge repeatedly in response to normal situations that pose no actual threat. But, due to the sensitive state and vigilance to the environment, non- or low threat stimuli are now interpreted as potentially dangerous and therefore the body responds. The first we know about this is the pain or tightening — the stiff low back. The pain and stiffness are motivators for us to take action, both in thought and behaviour. These thoughts and behaviours seek to reduce the threat and therefore reduce the pain (pain emerges in the person as a result of a perceived threat) and how the body is responding with it’s natural armour, the muscular system. As the need for defence diminishes, so the muscle tension eases and movement improves.

What reduces the threat and muscle tension?

  • Relaxation–this is a skill to learn
  • Mindfulness
  • Understanding pain and knowing that you are ‘safe’
  • Motor imagery

Changes at the joints can, but not always, affect the quality of movement. It is not a given that if your joints show arthritic change, movement will be problematic. Many people have arthritis but suffer no pain or stiffness. Whether you feel pain and stiffness or not is determined by many inter-related factors: e.g./ genetics, gender, past experience, beliefs, expectations, the environment; also known as pain vulnerabilities that all have an underpinning neurobiology that is becoming increasingly understood.

If you enjoyed this blog, please visit my Facebook page here and ‘like’ and/or my Twitter page here and retweet — thanks!

* Visit my home page here for details for appointments.

 

 

 

09Jun/15
Persisting low back pain

Do you have persisting low back pain?

Persisting low back painPersisting low back pain is common. It is the number one global health burden (Vos et al. 2012) and hence is the cause of much suffering,  and personal and societal cost. We need a re-think, because the misunderstanding of pain is at the root of this vast problem, especially when it comes to chronic low back pain: persisting or recurring.

I see people every day with chronic low back pain. It is one of the main vehicles that brings patients to my clinic. In many cases, chronic low back pain is part of the presentation with other complaints and problems including widespread pain, anxiety, irritable bowel syndrome, headaches, migraines, pelvic pain, disturbed sleep, poor concentration and performance at work, relationship disharmony and fertility issues. Is there a connection between these seemingly disparate issues? Yes. And by focusing on the whole-person, as suggested by the latest thinking in pain neuroscience, neuroscience and philosophy, we can create a tangible way forward.

So what can we think about? Here are some ideas with examples:

1. What is pain all about in this person?

  • Protection

2. How is the persisting back pain emerging in the individual?

  • Where in the body is the protection emerging?
  • Which (protective) body systems are interacting?
  • What is the context for the pain?
  • What features of the individual’s narrative suggest a vulnerability to persisting pain?
  • What habits of thought and action (the two being utterly entwined) exist?

3. What are the person’s beliefs about pain?

  • Pain = damage?

4. Why is the pain persisting?

  • Vulnerabilities to chronic pain
  • Is there a good reason for the pain to persist? Is it useful somehow, indicating a need for more action?

5. What needs to be done?

  • Understanding — the right thinking, pain can change
  • Create the opportunity for change
  • What action is required on a moment to moment basis?
  • Development of motivational skills and resilience
  • Persistence, courage, focus, determination

This is merely an insight, and conveniently broken into sections. There is no prescription, just facts about pain that we must work with and employ within a whole-person centred approach to overcoming persisting low back pain and other persisting pain problems.

For further information about treatment and coaching programmes to overcome pain, call now: 07518 445493

* Specialist Pain Physio Clinics: Harley Street | Chelsea | New Malden

 

16May/15
blue jeans

Blue genes | more pain in winter?

blue jeansA new study has shown that our immune system increases its pro-inflammatory status in the winter months — blue genes! We are naturally more inflammatory at certain times of the day (early hours of the morning; one reason for morning stiffness), but with an overall increase in pro-inflammatory messengers there is a greater likelihood of sensitivity and pain. Recall that pain is a whole body response to a perceived threat, and with more inflammatory molecules floating around the body, sensitising nerve endings, and thereby raising the chances of nociception (nociception does not necessarily result in pain).

How often do you hear people blame the weather for their pain, especially joint pain? This could go some way to explaining this phenomena, as well as the idea that an association develops between cold, damp weather and stiff, painful joints. In winter, the reactive immune system sets the scene for these experiences, perhaps as a way to motivate hibernation.

As a consequence of these findings, we should think about how we both explain people’s experiences of pain and conditions with an inflammatory character: e.g./ coughs, colds, heart disease and autoimmune diseases, and what we do to promote health. This could also explain mood as there is good data that depression could be an inflammatory condition as well as affect diabetes, also thought to have an inflammatory basis.

Read the full article here.

Pain Coach Programme to overcome chronic pain – call us on 07518 445493

11May/15
Pain Coach Programme

The language of back pain

Low back pain specialist LondonThe language we use when we talk about back pain is revealing and worthy of noting. This is both the language of the back pain sufferer and the clinician or therapist. Why? Because it highlights the beliefs held about back pain. Why is this important? Because the beliefs underpin the thoughts and action taken in response to the back pain.

Common descriptions that patients use when I ask them to narrate include the ‘slipped disc’, ‘wear and tear’, ‘disc bulge’, ‘worn out joints’, ‘weak spine’, ‘weak muscles’, ‘weak core’, ‘worn out spine’ and let’s not forget the range of expletives that can be attached the the above as well, ‘my ****** spine’, ‘it’s ********’, ‘when he looked at my x-ray, he told me I was ******’ — and I am not joking when I state these are just a few of the things I hear. Do bear in mind that I spend my days listening to people’s stories, making sense of their experience so that we can create a way to move forward.

And where do people obtain such language? They have been told that this is the case, they have read it on the net or heard from well-meaning significant and not so significant others. Sadly, these terms are not useful in any shape or form and in most cases create the wrong image, construct the wrong beliefs, leading to the wrong action and on-going threat and hence protection and pain (pain is about protection as regular readers appreciate).

Clinicians need to watch their language as they are in a position to deliver the right messages at key moments. This creates understanding, which emerges as behaviours and actions that are healthy and groove a way forward to overcome pain. The clinician will have a set of beliefs about pain, and perhaps suffers chronic pain himself/herself. Sticking to the facts about pain, being honest about what we don’t know, avoiding extrapolating a research finding to the populous when it has only been validated in a small number of people and focusing on the ‘cans’ rather than the limitations are just a few notable strategies. I am not going to tell you how to treat or deal with back pain here, merely highlight some observations that I have made over the years.

Back pain is a huge problem the world over and we need to think about it in a different way; a whole-person way, just like any other pain. Considering what we say, how we say it and when we say it is vital. The potency of language and communication should not be underestimated. The words we use will form an internal dialogue in the back pain sufferer’s mind, flavouring their pain perception. Let’s get it right.

Pain Coach ProgrammePain Coach Programmes for chronic and persisting low back pain — coaching you to overcome pain.

Call us on 07518 445493

 

26Apr/15
Surrey Business Awards 2015

Surrey Business Awards 2015 Winner

I was thrilled to be the Surrey Business Awards winner this year in the Mental Health and Wellbeing category — Get Surrey article here.

Surrey Business Awards 2015

Winning the award creates a platform from where I can continue to raise awareness of the problem of pain — chronic pain is the number one global health burden. Despite pain’s complexity, there is a great deal that we can do to overcome the problems. Modern pain science, and more recently the blend with philosophy, gives us better and better ways in which we can think about pain, and provides the basis for action that we can take to move forward, using practical and simple techniques and strategies.

Pain Coach ProgrammeMy Pain Coach Programme that is to be launched imminently delivers tangible and simple ways for anyone suffering chronic pain to move forward. Understanding pain is the first step, allowing the individual to think in the right way and make effective decisions moment to moment. The programmes are designed uniquely for the whole person, as pain is now known to be a whole person experience, emerging in that person as a result of many body systems acting to protect. Whilst this is removed from old-style Cartesian thinking and is inherently more complicated, modern thinking about pain permits far greater opportunity to change the way that these body systems are working, making the switch out of protect mode and into health mode.

UP | Understanding PainAlongside Pain Coach has been the recent launch of UP | Understand Pain, a campaign that I co-founded with Georgie Standage. Our first event was the hugely successful @upandsing day at London Heathrow when we had some 700 Rock Choir members singing out for pain. We promoted our messages:

  • Chronic pain is the number one global health burden
  • We can do something about it by understanding pain

We are now planning the next stages that includes Pain Coach days for people suffering chronic pain and their carers. The first date will be publicised soon via social media.

We CAN reduce the suffering by thinking differently and acting differently. This is true for individuals, policy makers and healthcare organisations and members.

For information about the clinics, Pain Coach and UP, please contact Jo on 07518 445493.