A quick note on brain~body — body~brain

The brain is where it’s at. Or so it seems if you read the press or look at the bookshelves. The notion that brain is everything has been challenged recently and so it should — see here. We need enquiry at every point, challenging the comfort of thinking that we know.

Despite this, it seems logical to think that the brain is involved with much of our existence. The ‘hows’ and ‘whys’ need continued clarification. In a crude sense, on the end of our brain lies a body. This body is where we feel life whether that be the experience of an external stimulus such as touch or the result of a thought that always triggers a physical and emotional response once we engage with that thought.

The term ‘body-mind’ has been used countless times by both mainstream practitioners of medicine and health and alternative or complimentary therapists. Most people understand the concept although many still try to deny the links. Can a thought really change the physiology in my body? Of course it can. It happens all the time. In fact, I would argue that our body functioning is the emergent physical manifestation of all the processing going on in the mind.

The way in which we move, posture, position ourselves is dependent upon the task at hand but also the task that we may engage with at some point in the near future. The brain is the greatest predictor and will continually analyse the environment, the situation and compare this to what it knows to create the actions necessary. In cases of chronic pain or stress, the brain becomes hypervigilant and responsive to a range of cues that would not normally evoke a protective response but now does via the the autonomic nervous system (‘fright or flight’), the nervous and immune systems.

Much of the activity in our body systems we are unaware of as the brain and reflexive activity takes care so we can attend to the necessary survival tasks. Filtering out the millions of stimuli, the brain draws our attention to what is deemed to be salient for that moment.

In a state of anxiety, this is usually felt in the body — churning stomach, tension, sweaty palms etc. We use the body as a yardstick as to how we are feeling although the thoughts evoking these bodily and physiological responses are not always immediately apparent. The thoughts will eventually pop in there, or emerge, this from an unspecified network of neurons in the brain.

In essence, we can think about the body~brain or brain~body relationship as a needy one; they need each other for full function. To separate makes no sense bit neither does to blame one or the other. Thinking about the emergent features of the synchrony appears to provide a better way of considering problems such as pain, stress and other conditions.

RS — Specialist Pain Physio Clinics, LondonĀ 

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